Swing district dems facing blowback at home from progressives

Mar 2012
57,998
39,552
New Hampshire
#1
My congresswoman got yelled down at her town hall recently about impeachment...Sigh.

Freshman moderate Rep. Conor Lamb won his Republican-held district last year by dodging his party’s leftward drift toward “Medicare for All” and the “Green New Deal.”

But when the Pennsylvania Democrat returned home this month, he faced dozens of progressives begging him to sign onto some of the most liberal legislation the House has ever seen.

Progressive suburban voters, including in swing districts like Lamb’s, are turning out in droves at town halls to complain about Congress’s inaction on their progressive wish list — even as their representatives remain firmly in the centrist column. It highlights the quandary the vulnerable Democrats find themselves in: Remain moderate enough to appeal to the middle but risk the ire of the invigorated progressives.

At public events this week, freshmen in battleground districts in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and California heard from voters clamoring for Medicare for All, drastic climate action, gun control and the impeachment of President Donald Trump, among other priorities. And it’s not just sign-holding, T-shirt clad activists coming to the mics: It’s white-haired men in golf polos, and moms in work dresses and heels.

The mood of the August recess in many districts this summer is one of exasperation. House Democrats have a majority for the first time in eight years — but not enough to show for it, according to some voters.

Swing-district Dems face blowback from progressive voters
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
70,175
60,218
CA
#2
My congresswoman got yelled down at her town hall recently about impeachment...Sigh.

Freshman moderate Rep. Conor Lamb won his Republican-held district last year by dodging his party’s leftward drift toward “Medicare for All” and the “Green New Deal.”

But when the Pennsylvania Democrat returned home this month, he faced dozens of progressives begging him to sign onto some of the most liberal legislation the House has ever seen.

Progressive suburban voters, including in swing districts like Lamb’s, are turning out in droves at town halls to complain about Congress’s inaction on their progressive wish list — even as their representatives remain firmly in the centrist column. It highlights the quandary the vulnerable Democrats find themselves in: Remain moderate enough to appeal to the middle but risk the ire of the invigorated progressives.

At public events this week, freshmen in battleground districts in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and California heard from voters clamoring for Medicare for All, drastic climate action, gun control and the impeachment of President Donald Trump, among other priorities. And it’s not just sign-holding, T-shirt clad activists coming to the mics: It’s white-haired men in golf polos, and moms in work dresses and heels.

The mood of the August recess in many districts this summer is one of exasperation. House Democrats have a majority for the first time in eight years — but not enough to show for it, according to some voters.

Swing-district Dems face blowback from progressive voters
I watching something on TV about the "Summit" movement?

They want all the nominees to sign off on the New Green Deal.

I thought to myself, oh to be so young and optimistic.

In the real world, that is not how it works, especially in a divided government.

People apparently don't understand that??
 
Likes: bajisima
Jun 2014
49,527
50,455
United States
#3
My congresswoman got yelled down at her town hall recently about impeachment...Sigh.

Freshman moderate Rep. Conor Lamb won his Republican-held district last year by dodging his party’s leftward drift toward “Medicare for All” and the “Green New Deal.”

But when the Pennsylvania Democrat returned home this month, he faced dozens of progressives begging him to sign onto some of the most liberal legislation the House has ever seen.

Progressive suburban voters, including in swing districts like Lamb’s, are turning out in droves at town halls to complain about Congress’s inaction on their progressive wish list — even as their representatives remain firmly in the centrist column. It highlights the quandary the vulnerable Democrats find themselves in: Remain moderate enough to appeal to the middle but risk the ire of the invigorated progressives.

At public events this week, freshmen in battleground districts in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and California heard from voters clamoring for Medicare for All, drastic climate action, gun control and the impeachment of President Donald Trump, among other priorities. And it’s not just sign-holding, T-shirt clad activists coming to the mics: It’s white-haired men in golf polos, and moms in work dresses and heels.

The mood of the August recess in many districts this summer is one of exasperation. House Democrats have a majority for the first time in eight years — but not enough to show for it, according to some voters.

Swing-district Dems face blowback from progressive voters

I don't see any reason for these Democrats be exasperated. The House has passed a lot of legislation, but if Democrats don't win back the Senate, not much will get done. They can simply run their campaigns for their constituents, and not be defined by fringe activists.
 

Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
71,038
47,901
USA
#5
I don't see any reason for these Democrats be exasperated. The House has passed a lot of legislation, but if Democrats don't win back the Senate, not much will get done. They can simply run their campaigns for their constituents, and not be defined by fringe activists.
Shades of the Tea Party, who would threaten to primary insufficiently conservative Republicans from the right, then see them move into the Freedom Caucus, which was really good at keeping legislation from passing (via the Hastert Rule) but didn't really accomplish much on their wish list. The politics of jamming whatever you like down the majority's throat has given us about two decades of government that can't move.

"“Politics is the art of the possible, the attainable — the art of the next best” --Otto von Bismark
 
Likes: NightSwimmer
Jun 2014
49,527
50,455
United States
#6
Shades of the Tea Party, who would threaten to primary insufficiently conservative Republicans from the right, then see them move into the Freedom Caucus, which was really good at keeping legislation from passing (via the Hastert Rule) but didn't really accomplish much on their wish list. The politics of jamming whatever you like down the majority's throat has given us about two decades of government that can't move.

"“Politics is the art of the possible, the attainable — the art of the next best” --Otto von Bismark

Of course, ideological extremists have every right to make their voices heard -- left-wing or right-wing. It does tend to become a problem though, when politicians pander to the extremists. If every Democratic Representative had to run on Bernie Sanders' platform, many of them would lose their seats. Politics is still local.
 
Mar 2019
8,448
2,971
California
#7
Of course, ideological extremists have every right to make their voices heard -- left-wing or right-wing. It does tend to become a problem though, when politicians pander to the extremists. If every Democratic Representative had to run on Bernie Sanders' platform, many of them would lose their seats. Politics is still local.
Sensible.
 
Feb 2010
34,667
24,618
between Moon and NYC
#8
My congresswoman got yelled down at her town hall recently about impeachment...Sigh.

Freshman moderate Rep. Conor Lamb won his Republican-held district last year by dodging his party’s leftward drift toward “Medicare for All” and the “Green New Deal.”

But when the Pennsylvania Democrat returned home this month, he faced dozens of progressives begging him to sign onto some of the most liberal legislation the House has ever seen.

Progressive suburban voters, including in swing districts like Lamb’s, are turning out in droves at town halls to complain about Congress’s inaction on their progressive wish list — even as their representatives remain firmly in the centrist column. It highlights the quandary the vulnerable Democrats find themselves in: Remain moderate enough to appeal to the middle but risk the ire of the invigorated progressives.

At public events this week, freshmen in battleground districts in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and California heard from voters clamoring for Medicare for All, drastic climate action, gun control and the impeachment of President Donald Trump, among other priorities. And it’s not just sign-holding, T-shirt clad activists coming to the mics: It’s white-haired men in golf polos, and moms in work dresses and heels.

The mood of the August recess in many districts this summer is one of exasperation. House Democrats have a majority for the first time in eight years — but not enough to show for it, according to some voters.

Swing-district Dems face blowback from progressive voters

Being elected to a district with a relatively balanced number of Left/Right voters is always a challenge. But particularly precarious in our current polarized times.

Trying to maintain a moderate position while at the national level the two parties are throwing firebombs daily.


(Might drive a folk to drinkin'.......)



..




...
 
Likes: bajisima
Jun 2014
49,527
50,455
United States
#9
Being elected to a district with a relatively balanced number of Left/Right voters is always a challenge. But particularly precarious in our current polarized times.

Trying to maintain a moderate position while at the national level the two parties are throwing firebombs daily.


(Might drive a folk to drinkin'.......)



..




...

I am.

WTH? It's Friday. ;)
 
Jul 2016
7,136
6,281
Florida
#10
My congresswoman got yelled down at her town hall recently about impeachment...Sigh.

Freshman moderate Rep. Conor Lamb won his Republican-held district last year by dodging his party’s leftward drift toward “Medicare for All” and the “Green New Deal.”

But when the Pennsylvania Democrat returned home this month, he faced dozens of progressives begging him to sign onto some of the most liberal legislation the House has ever seen.

Progressive suburban voters, including in swing districts like Lamb’s, are turning out in droves at town halls to complain about Congress’s inaction on their progressive wish list — even as their representatives remain firmly in the centrist column. It highlights the quandary the vulnerable Democrats find themselves in: Remain moderate enough to appeal to the middle but risk the ire of the invigorated progressives.

At public events this week, freshmen in battleground districts in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and California heard from voters clamoring for Medicare for All, drastic climate action, gun control and the impeachment of President Donald Trump, among other priorities. And it’s not just sign-holding, T-shirt clad activists coming to the mics: It’s white-haired men in golf polos, and moms in work dresses and heels.

The mood of the August recess in many districts this summer is one of exasperation. House Democrats have a majority for the first time in eight years — but not enough to show for it, according to some voters.

Swing-district Dems face blowback from progressive voters
If it's what the people want, do it.