Switzerland’s High Rate of Gun Ownership and Low Murder Rate Proves What 2A Advocates

Nov 2008
64,078
5,025
Washington state
#1
Law-abiding gun owners have had their names dragged through the mud since the media began their post-Parkland crusade against guns.
Grief-stricken teenagers who know next-to-nothing about gun crime statistics, laws governing firearms, or the Constitution, have been basking in the glory of the relentless media coverage they've received, spewing profanities and blatantly accusing the NRA and gun-rights advocates everywhere of having blood on their hands.
While gun violence is often classified as an "American problem" because we have a unique affinity for gun culture, it is important not to assess the US in a vacuum. Is the US the only country that values the importance of the right to bear arms? No
While you might hear how few gun deaths occur in countries like Canada, Japan, or the UK, toted as evidence that mass gun control works, the left will rarely mention Switzerland, a country with a heavily armed populace that has enjoyed peace and relatively low crime rates for decades.
"The country has about 2 million privately owned guns in a nation of 8.3 million people. In 2016, the country had 47 attempted homicides with firearms. The country's overall murder rate is near zero," writes Business Insider.
Switzerland hasn't had a mass shooting since 2001, when a man stormed the local parliament in Zug, killing 14 people and then himself.
The country has about 2 million privately owned guns in a nation of 8.3 million people. In 2016, the country had 47 attempted homicides with firearms. The country's overall murder rate is near zero.
The National Rifle Association often points to Switzerland to argue that more rules on gun ownership aren't necessary. In 2016, the NRA said on its blog that the European country had one of the lowest murder rates in the world while still having millions of privately owned guns and a few hunting weapons that don't even require a permit.
But the Swiss have some specific rules and regulations for gun use.

The article also points out that the Swiss have incredibly tight gun registration and prohibitions against the mentally ill, the violent, or the incompetent from owning a firearm. This is, of course, as if the US doesn't make it downright impossible to carry or to buy certain weapons in many states, or as if we don't have stringent background check procedures or federal oversight for firearm dealer licenses, of course.
"Gun owners who want to carry their weapon for 'defensive purposes,'" the article notes, "also have to prove they can properly load, unload, and shoot their weapon and must pass a test to get a license," something that is true for many states that issue concealed carry licenses.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/switzerland-gun-laws-rates-of-gun-deaths-2018-2

The fact that Switzerland has almost zero murder rate while people own guns blows the idea that guns are the problem. Notice they require a license to own a gun and they have to be competent and prove they can handle it safely. No criminals or anyone with mental issues gets a gun. We should do what Switzerland does
 
Likes: 1 person
Feb 2007
11,339
9,627
In my mind
#2
I think it proves the Swiss are for more sophisticated and developed as a culture than we are, whereas they are not prone to violence.

Or maybe it is their socialism that does it.
 
Likes: 3 people
Nov 2008
64,078
5,025
Washington state
#3
I think it proves the Swiss are for more sophisticated and developed as a culture than we are, whereas they are not prone to violence.

Or maybe it is their socialism that does it.
It’s because they don’t allow anyone to own a gun. Have to get a license and criminals and people with mental problems can’t get a license. I have been for licensing for a long time. We need a license to drive a car, why not a gun
 
Likes: 1 person
Dec 2013
3,449
2,400
Switzerland
#4
Being Swiss and living in Switzerland, I can tell you one important thing, which you seem to ignore. There may be 2 millions guns in the hands of private persons in Switzerland but there is big but. Most of them are military rifles that you can load only with 7.5 mm rounds. And the traditional NATO caliber is 7,69mm. (Switzerland has an army based on a militia system and few professional soldiers outside borders guards, military instructors and generals). These rounds are manufatured for the army only and you cannot buy them for a private use without having a licence. Military service is compulsory in Switzerland and it is a militia system. So anyway soldiers keep their rifles at home like their uniform and Equipment and have each year as long as they are in the army shooting training in special shooting facilities you find everywhere- There you can find ammunitions to shoot the 24 rounds in a a target at 300 meters. You find the rounds there and you cannot leave the place with cartridges. When you are no more in the army you can keep your rifle and are authorized to go on trianing if you want but always in these special shooting facilities. For the other guns people can purchase privately the controls are very tight to be able to purchase a gun and buy runds as explain in post 1 and in fact very few people havec the necessary licence for such guns. The argument of post one is therefore twisted, because people may have a miltary rifle at home but cannot get ammunitions to use it outside the facilities I just mentioned. So in fact this huge quantity of rifles in the hands of soldiers or former soldiers like the K31, the Stgw 57 and the Stgw 90 (caliber 5.6mm) are neutralized. For people who have guns just for training they have not the right to have the guns and the ammunitions in the same car, when they go form their home to the shooting place !
 
Likes: 9 people
Dec 2015
16,828
12,176
SoCal
#5
Law-abiding gun owners have had their names dragged through the mud since the media began their post-Parkland crusade against guns.
Grief-stricken teenagers who know next-to-nothing about gun crime statistics, laws governing firearms, or the Constitution, have been basking in the glory of the relentless media coverage they've received, spewing profanities and blatantly accusing the NRA and gun-rights advocates everywhere of having blood on their hands.
While gun violence is often classified as an "American problem" because we have a unique affinity for gun culture, it is important not to assess the US in a vacuum. Is the US the only country that values the importance of the right to bear arms? No
While you might hear how few gun deaths occur in countries like Canada, Japan, or the UK, toted as evidence that mass gun control works, the left will rarely mention Switzerland, a country with a heavily armed populace that has enjoyed peace and relatively low crime rates for decades.
"The country has about 2 million privately owned guns in a nation of 8.3 million people. In 2016, the country had 47 attempted homicides with firearms. The country's overall murder rate is near zero," writes Business Insider.
Switzerland hasn't had a mass shooting since 2001, when a man stormed the local parliament in Zug, killing 14 people and then himself.
The country has about 2 million privately owned guns in a nation of 8.3 million people. In 2016, the country had 47 attempted homicides with firearms. The country's overall murder rate is near zero.
The National Rifle Association often points to Switzerland to argue that more rules on gun ownership aren't necessary. In 2016, the NRA said on its blog that the European country had one of the lowest murder rates in the world while still having millions of privately owned guns and a few hunting weapons that don't even require a permit.
But the Swiss have some specific rules and regulations for gun use.

The article also points out that the Swiss have incredibly tight gun registration and prohibitions against the mentally ill, the violent, or the incompetent from owning a firearm. This is, of course, as if the US doesn't make it downright impossible to carry or to buy certain weapons in many states, or as if we don't have stringent background check procedures or federal oversight for firearm dealer licenses, of course.
"Gun owners who want to carry their weapon for 'defensive purposes,'" the article notes, "also have to prove they can properly load, unload, and shoot their weapon and must pass a test to get a license," something that is true for many states that issue concealed carry licenses.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/switzerland-gun-laws-rates-of-gun-deaths-2018-2

The fact that Switzerland has almost zero murder rate while people own guns blows the idea that guns are the problem. Notice they require a license to own a gun and they have to be competent and prove they can handle it safely. No criminals or anyone with mental issues gets a gun. We should do what Switzerland does
The Swiss actually have a well-regulated militia. Perhaps we should try that.
 
Likes: 5 people
Nov 2008
64,078
5,025
Washington state
#6
Being Swiss and living in Switzerland, I can tell you one important thing, which you seem to ignore. There may be 2 millions guns in the hands of private persons in Switzerland but there is big but. Most of them are military rifles that you can load only with 7.5 mm rounds. And the traditional NATO caliber is 7,69mm. (Switzerland has an army based on a militia system and few professional soldiers outside borders guards, military instructors and generals). These rounds are manufatured for the army only and you cannot buy them for a private use without having a licence. Military service is compulsory in Switzerland and it is a militia system. So anyway soldiers keep their rifles at home like their uniform and Equipment and have each year as long as they are in the army shooting training in special shooting facilities you find everywhere- There you can find ammunitions to shoot the 24 rounds in a a target at 300 meters. You find the rounds there and you cannot leave the place with cartridges. When you are no more in the army you can keep your rifle and are authorized to go on trianing if you want but always in these special shooting facilities. For the other guns people can purchase privately the controls are very tight to be able to purchase a gun and buy runds as explain in post 1 and in fact very few people havec the necessary licence for such guns. The argument of post one is therefore twisted, because people may have a miltary rifle at home but cannot get ammunitions to use it outside the facilities I just mentioned. So in fact this huge quantity of rifles in the hands of soldiers or former soldiers like the K31, the Stgw 57 and the Stgw 90 (caliber 5.6mm) are neutralized. For people who have guns just for training they have not the right to have the guns and the ammunitions in the same car, when they go form their home to the shooting place !
Is it against the law to make your own ammunition. I have made ammo for a 6.5mm rifle I have , the cartridge is obsolete.