Texans to Trump: Forget about the wall

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
66,240
54,857
CA
#1
Trump’s visit to Texas for a photo op at the southern border reminds us that the politics of the wall in Texas, a state that reelected Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) by less than 3 points and flipped 2 House seats from Republican to Democratic, is not what Republicans would have you believe .A Quinnipiac University poll conducted in July showed Texas voters opposed building a wall by a margin of 51-to-45 percent; independents opposed the wall by a nine-point margin. Meanwhile, in an April Quinnipiac poll Texans signaled they wanted more border patrols 60 percent to 37 percent.

Rep. Will Hurd (R-Tex.), the member of Congress with the largest stretch of border in his district, strongly opposes the wall. (“I think building a concrete structure sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” he said recently.) In 2017, he told the Atlantic, "Property rights are important to all Americans — especially Texans — and most of the property along our border has been privately held for generation." He continued, “Many Texans I speak to think there are better ways to achieve border security without taking their lands, so you can expect a lengthy and expensive fight from these folks.

Litigation is still pending on behalf of some of those from whom land was taken after President George W. Bush signed the Secure Fence Act in 2006.

“Border security is three things: It is barriers in places that are hard to control, it is technology, ground sensors, radar, drones and other technological devices used to supplement the barriers, and then it’s people,” Senator John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said this week on Fox News. “It really is a combination of those three, and there is no one-size-fits-all prescription for the entire border. It’s quite a diverse geography.” [Republican Gov. Greg] Abbott, in a statement to The Post, emphasized that the state has spent billions on border security. But he did not forcefully demand a border wall.

As Hurd warned, landowners have prepared for a fight should Trump proceed with a wall. Indeed, they’ve already started fighting against existing plans to extend fencing. The Associated Press reports that funding for 33 miles of fencing previously authorized by Congress would “cut across private land in the Rio Grande Valley. Those in the way include landowners who have lived in the valley for generations, environmental groups and a 19th century chapel.” As one might expect, “Many have hired lawyers who are preparing to fight the government if, as expected, it moves to seize their land through eminent domain.” And if Trump proceeds with “more than 215 new miles of wall, including 104 miles in the Rio Grande Valley and 55 miles near Laredo”? The AP reports, “Even a compromise solution to build ‘steel slats,’ as Trump has suggested, or more fencing of the kind that Democrats have previously supported would likely trigger more court cases and pushback in Texas.”


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...ump-forget-about-wall/?utm_term=.b20f675cd23a

When you don't even have Texas on board with you...
 

Davocrat

Former Staff
Apr 2007
50,998
37,166
Deep State
#2
Those aren't REAL Texans. I think the American Psychological Association has infiltrated this once great state.
 
Nov 2013
10,562
10,043
NY
#3
Trump’s visit to Texas for a photo op at the southern border reminds us that the politics of the wall in Texas, a state that reelected Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) by less than 3 points and flipped 2 House seats from Republican to Democratic, is not what Republicans would have you believe .A Quinnipiac University poll conducted in July showed Texas voters opposed building a wall by a margin of 51-to-45 percent; independents opposed the wall by a nine-point margin. Meanwhile, in an April Quinnipiac poll Texans signaled they wanted more border patrols 60 percent to 37 percent.

Rep. Will Hurd (R-Tex.), the member of Congress with the largest stretch of border in his district, strongly opposes the wall. (“I think building a concrete structure sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” he said recently.) In 2017, he told the Atlantic, "Property rights are important to all Americans — especially Texans — and most of the property along our border has been privately held for generation." He continued, “Many Texans I speak to think there are better ways to achieve border security without taking their lands, so you can expect a lengthy and expensive fight from these folks.

Litigation is still pending on behalf of some of those from whom land was taken after President George W. Bush signed the Secure Fence Act in 2006.

“Border security is three things: It is barriers in places that are hard to control, it is technology, ground sensors, radar, drones and other technological devices used to supplement the barriers, and then it’s people,” Senator John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said this week on Fox News. “It really is a combination of those three, and there is no one-size-fits-all prescription for the entire border. It’s quite a diverse geography.” [Republican Gov. Greg] Abbott, in a statement to The Post, emphasized that the state has spent billions on border security. But he did not forcefully demand a border wall.

As Hurd warned, landowners have prepared for a fight should Trump proceed with a wall. Indeed, they’ve already started fighting against existing plans to extend fencing. The Associated Press reports that funding for 33 miles of fencing previously authorized by Congress would “cut across private land in the Rio Grande Valley. Those in the way include landowners who have lived in the valley for generations, environmental groups and a 19th century chapel.” As one might expect, “Many have hired lawyers who are preparing to fight the government if, as expected, it moves to seize their land through eminent domain.” And if Trump proceeds with “more than 215 new miles of wall, including 104 miles in the Rio Grande Valley and 55 miles near Laredo”? The AP reports, “Even a compromise solution to build ‘steel slats,’ as Trump has suggested, or more fencing of the kind that Democrats have previously supported would likely trigger more court cases and pushback in Texas.”


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...ump-forget-about-wall/?utm_term=.b20f675cd23a

When you don't even have Texas on board with you...
Those aren't REAL Texans. I think the American Psychological Association has infiltrated this once great state.
It's a good thing that JTF is watching guard over the state though, to prevent the most disastrous "liberalization" from happening.
 
Jan 2019
306
261
Midwest
#4
Trump’s visit to Texas for a photo op at the southern border reminds us that the politics of the wall in Texas, a state that reelected Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) by less than 3 points and flipped 2 House seats from Republican to Democratic, is not what Republicans would have you believe .A Quinnipiac University poll conducted in July showed Texas voters opposed building a wall by a margin of 51-to-45 percent; independents opposed the wall by a nine-point margin. Meanwhile, in an April Quinnipiac poll Texans signaled they wanted more border patrols 60 percent to 37 percent.

Rep. Will Hurd (R-Tex.), the member of Congress with the largest stretch of border in his district, strongly opposes the wall. (“I think building a concrete structure sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” he said recently.) In 2017, he told the Atlantic, "Property rights are important to all Americans — especially Texans — and most of the property along our border has been privately held for generation." He continued, “Many Texans I speak to think there are better ways to achieve border security without taking their lands, so you can expect a lengthy and expensive fight from these folks.

Litigation is still pending on behalf of some of those from whom land was taken after President George W. Bush signed the Secure Fence Act in 2006.

“Border security is three things: It is barriers in places that are hard to control, it is technology, ground sensors, radar, drones and other technological devices used to supplement the barriers, and then it’s people,” Senator John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said this week on Fox News. “It really is a combination of those three, and there is no one-size-fits-all prescription for the entire border. It’s quite a diverse geography.” [Republican Gov. Greg] Abbott, in a statement to The Post, emphasized that the state has spent billions on border security. But he did not forcefully demand a border wall.

As Hurd warned, landowners have prepared for a fight should Trump proceed with a wall. Indeed, they’ve already started fighting against existing plans to extend fencing. The Associated Press reports that funding for 33 miles of fencing previously authorized by Congress would “cut across private land in the Rio Grande Valley. Those in the way include landowners who have lived in the valley for generations, environmental groups and a 19th century chapel.” As one might expect, “Many have hired lawyers who are preparing to fight the government if, as expected, it moves to seize their land through eminent domain.” And if Trump proceeds with “more than 215 new miles of wall, including 104 miles in the Rio Grande Valley and 55 miles near Laredo”? The AP reports, “Even a compromise solution to build ‘steel slats,’ as Trump has suggested, or more fencing of the kind that Democrats have previously supported would likely trigger more court cases and pushback in Texas.”


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...ump-forget-about-wall/?utm_term=.b20f675cd23a

When you don't even have Texas on board with you...

These landowners will fight Trump's emminent domain claims. He won't win the National Emergency battle, either. he hasn't spend the $1.3 BN the republican congress gave him for border security in 2017....he has no argument on it being an emergency. Looks like Texas is going Democrat in 2020
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
25,485
17,956
Colorado
#5
These landowners will fight Trump's emminent domain claims. He won't win the National Emergency battle, either. he hasn't spend the $1.3 BN the republican congress gave him for border security in 2017....he has no argument on it being an emergency. Looks like Texas is going Democrat in 2020
IIRC Texas leads the nation in failure to win eminent domain cases by the land owners. I may be wrong on the stat - but fighting those claims can often mean bankruptcy for the current owners.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
66,240
54,857
CA
#7
We don't need no stinking wall, there is no violent criminals at the border.

21 bodies found on US-Mexico border as Trump visits

"Mexico City (AFP) - Mexican authorities said Thursday they had found 21 bodies on the US-Mexican border after a drug-gang shootout in a town near where President Donald Trump was due to visit later in the day. "
Irrelevant to the actual topic here. It was on the Mexico/Texas border. Even your article says this - The Mexican army found the bodies in a remote area following a tip-off, he said.

Hurd
Coryn
Abbott

All DO NOT WANT THE WALL.

So that is a house member, a Senator, and the Governor.

And this couple just won their case in Texas


Troy couple wins I-35 eminent domain case

95% of the property in Texas is privately owned. Just imagine the deluge of lawsuits that would flood in against this stupid wall.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
66,240
54,857
CA
#8
Nayda Alvarez wants nothing to do with any border wall, but her acre of land in Rio Grande City, Tex., where she lives in a brown house along the dividing line between the United States and Mexico, has become of great interest to the U.S. government.

She, along with dozens of other landowners in the Rio Grande Valley, received surprise letters from the federal government in recent months, requests from officials who are seeking access to their properties for surveys, soil tests, equipment storage and other actions. It is, lawyers and experts say, the first step in the government trying to seize private property using the power of eminent domain — a contentious step that could put a lengthy legal wrinkle into President Trump’s plans to build hundreds of miles of wall, some of which passes through land like Alvarez’s.

Previous eminent domain attempts along the Texas border have led to more than a decade of court battles, some of which date to George W. Bush’s administration and have yet to be resolved. Many landowners, like Alvarez, are vowing to fight anew. Alvarez refused to sign over access to her property, which was handed down from her grandfather. She yelled at her father for allowing the government onto his land. And she had a message for Trump, who is scheduled to visit nearby McAllen on Thursday afternoon: no border wall, a phrase she wanted to write on her roof so Trump could see it if he flew over her home. She decided against doing so because of rain.

“If it’s going to be a contiguous wall across the entire southwest border, you’re talking about a massive land seizure of private property,”
he said. Most people, he said, are not willing to voluntarily hand over their land, even with a fair market price, forcing the government to go to court to obtain it. “You’re talking about thousands and thousands of eminent domain proceedings that would have to run through federal district courts in Texas for the most part, but also places such as Arizona and New Mexico.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...ef28312c8b9_story.html?utm_term=.bdaa8bbed631

Sounds like a lot of landowners in Texas are REALLY pissed off.
 
Feb 2018
1,063
520
Texas
#9
Trump’s visit to Texas for a photo op at the southern border reminds us that the politics of the wall in Texas, a state that reelected Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) by less than 3 points and flipped 2 House seats from Republican to Democratic, is not what Republicans would have you believe .A Quinnipiac University poll conducted in July showed Texas voters opposed building a wall by a margin of 51-to-45 percent; independents opposed the wall by a nine-point margin. Meanwhile, in an April Quinnipiac poll Texans signaled they wanted more border patrols 60 percent to 37 percent.

Rep. Will Hurd (R-Tex.), the member of Congress with the largest stretch of border in his district, strongly opposes the wall. (“I think building a concrete structure sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” he said recently.) In 2017, he told the Atlantic, "Property rights are important to all Americans — especially Texans — and most of the property along our border has been privately held for generation." He continued, “Many Texans I speak to think there are better ways to achieve border security without taking their lands, so you can expect a lengthy and expensive fight from these folks.

Litigation is still pending on behalf of some of those from whom land was taken after President George W. Bush signed the Secure Fence Act in 2006.

“Border security is three things: It is barriers in places that are hard to control, it is technology, ground sensors, radar, drones and other technological devices used to supplement the barriers, and then it’s people,” Senator John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said this week on Fox News. “It really is a combination of those three, and there is no one-size-fits-all prescription for the entire border. It’s quite a diverse geography.” [Republican Gov. Greg] Abbott, in a statement to The Post, emphasized that the state has spent billions on border security. But he did not forcefully demand a border wall.

As Hurd warned, landowners have prepared for a fight should Trump proceed with a wall. Indeed, they’ve already started fighting against existing plans to extend fencing. The Associated Press reports that funding for 33 miles of fencing previously authorized by Congress would “cut across private land in the Rio Grande Valley. Those in the way include landowners who have lived in the valley for generations, environmental groups and a 19th century chapel.” As one might expect, “Many have hired lawyers who are preparing to fight the government if, as expected, it moves to seize their land through eminent domain.” And if Trump proceeds with “more than 215 new miles of wall, including 104 miles in the Rio Grande Valley and 55 miles near Laredo”? The AP reports, “Even a compromise solution to build ‘steel slats,’ as Trump has suggested, or more fencing of the kind that Democrats have previously supported would likely trigger more court cases and pushback in Texas.”


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...ump-forget-about-wall/?utm_term=.b20f675cd23a

When you don't even have Texas on board with you...

Most Texans are on board for a border wall however, left wing sources will never report that fact.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
66,240
54,857
CA
#10