The harmeless president?

Apr 2018
9
3
New Hampshire
#1
George Herbert Walker Bush is dead and buried with full honors as the 41st president of the United States. What we are told to remember about him is circulating on television, radio, newspapers and social media. Apparently he was great man who did great things like say we needed a kinder, gentler nation and no new taxes. I voted for Ross Perot to try and save the company pensions and affordable health insurance you no longer get.

The official narrative is awash with quaint references of bush being the “quiet”, unappreciated president who did no harm. The problem is I don’t have amnesia. An article in the New York Times on Sept. 23, 1990 pointed out that the invasion of Kuwait which resulted in the Gulf War began with Bush and his kinder, gentler approach to a menace named Saddam Hussein.

Hussein was rattling a sabre with 30,000 troops amassed on the Border of Kuwait. Bush dispatched April Glaspie, US Ambassador to Iraq on July 25, 1990 to meet with Hussein where she delivered a message. The message did not say, if you attack Kuwait we will intervene militarily. Glaspie delivered Bush’s message that the US wanted to maintain friendly relations with Iraq and was curious as to Saddam’s intentions.

Saddam was at the end of his rope because he was heavily in debt to Kuwait and Kuwait was producing oil at a high level cutting into Iraq’s revenues. Saddam was testing the waters when he announced to Glaspie that he fully intended to annex Kuwait under the pretext of it stealing his oil through slant drilling unless a solution could be reached.

Incredibly, Glaspie responded by saying that the US has no opinion on border disputes between Arab nations. Clearly Saddam understood this to mean that the US would not intervene; he promptly took Kuwait eight days later.

Students of history may recognize that this is the kind of lethal diplomatic incompetence that starts major wars and the Gulf war ensued ending with Saddam’s retreating troops mixed with civilians in Volkswagens being slaughtered on the highway of Death which enraged Arabs everywhere.

1993: Arab revenge attack # 1 on World Trade Center. 2001: attack #2 by agents of Saudi Arabia utterly destroys it. 2003: Bush’s son attacks Iraq which had no part in 9/11 obscuring a black mark on his father’s legacy.

Arabs still hate us; more attacks coming.

https://www.nytimes.com/1990/09/23/w...-us-envoy.html
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...040203485.html
https://foreignpolicy.com/2011/01/09...addam-hussein/
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/sk...d-kuwait-37237
https://www.history.com/topics/middl...rsian-gulf-war
 
Likes: BarKnuckles
Dec 2013
11,500
12,393
Work
#3
George Herbert Walker Bush is dead and buried with full honors as the 41st president of the United States. What we are told to remember about him is circulating on television, radio, newspapers and social media. Apparently he was great man who did great things like say we needed a kinder, gentler nation and no new taxes. I voted for Ross Perot to try and save the company pensions and affordable health insurance you no longer get.

The official narrative is awash with quaint references of bush being the “quiet”, unappreciated president who did no harm. The problem is I don’t have amnesia. An article in the New York Times on Sept. 23, 1990 pointed out that the invasion of Kuwait which resulted in the Gulf War began with Bush and his kinder, gentler approach to a menace named Saddam Hussein.

Hussein was rattling a sabre with 30,000 troops amassed on the Border of Kuwait. Bush dispatched April Glaspie, US Ambassador to Iraq on July 25, 1990 to meet with Hussein where she delivered a message. The message did not say, if you attack Kuwait we will intervene militarily. Glaspie delivered Bush’s message that the US wanted to maintain friendly relations with Iraq and was curious as to Saddam’s intentions.

Saddam was at the end of his rope because he was heavily in debt to Kuwait and Kuwait was producing oil at a high level cutting into Iraq’s revenues. Saddam was testing the waters when he announced to Glaspie that he fully intended to annex Kuwait under the pretext of it stealing his oil through slant drilling unless a solution could be reached.

Incredibly, Glaspie responded by saying that the US has no opinion on border disputes between Arab nations. Clearly Saddam understood this to mean that the US would not intervene; he promptly took Kuwait eight days later.

Students of history may recognize that this is the kind of lethal diplomatic incompetence that starts major wars and the Gulf war ensued ending with Saddam’s retreating troops mixed with civilians in Volkswagens being slaughtered on the highway of Death which enraged Arabs everywhere.

1993: Arab revenge attack # 1 on World Trade Center. 2001: attack #2 by agents of Saudi Arabia utterly destroys it. 2003: Bush’s son attacks Iraq which had no part in 9/11 obscuring a black mark on his father’s legacy.

Arabs still hate us; more attacks coming.

https://www.nytimes.com/1990/09/23/w...-us-envoy.html
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...040203485.html
https://foreignpolicy.com/2011/01/09...addam-hussein/
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/sk...d-kuwait-37237
https://www.history.com/topics/middl...rsian-gulf-war

People like to believe that Bush Junior was the first to concoct a war rationale from whole cloth, but of course his father was quite good at it too, as well as presidents before him. From Wikipedia (apologies for the excessive links to commonly understood terms):

The Nayirah testimony was a false testimony given before the Congressional Human Rights Caucus on October 10, 1990 by a 15-year-old girl who provided only her first name, Nayirah. The testimony was widely publicized, and was cited numerous times by United States senators and President George H. W. Bush in their rationale to back Kuwait in the Gulf War. In 1992, it was revealed that Nayirah's last name was al-Ṣabaḥ (Arabic: نيرة الصباح‎) and that she was the daughter of Saud Al-Sabah, the Kuwaiti ambassador to the United States. Furthermore, it was revealed that her testimony was organized as part of the Citizens for a Free Kuwait public relations campaign which was run by an American public relations firm Hill & Knowlton for the Kuwaiti government. Following this, al-Sabah's testimony has come to be regarded as a classic example of modern atrocity propaganda.[1][2]
In her emotional testimony, Nayirah stated that after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait she had witnessed Iraqi soldiers take babies out of incubators in a Kuwaiti hospital, take the incubators, and leave the babies to die.​
Her story was initially corroborated by Amnesty International[3] and testimony from evacuees. Following the liberation of Kuwait, reporters were given access to the country. An ABC report found that "patients, including premature babies, did die, when many of Kuwait's nurses and doctors... fled" but Iraqi troops "almost certainly had not stolen hospital incubators and left hundreds of Kuwaiti babies to die."[4][5] Amnesty International reacted by issuing a correction, with executive director John Healey subsequently accusing the Bush administration of "opportunistic manipulation of the international human rights movement".[6]
 
Apr 2018
9
3
New Hampshire
#9
When Saddam's troops along with civilians were fleeing on the Highway of Death they were cut off from both sides and had nowhere to go when they were slaughtered with air power. That was almost certainly a violation of the Geneva Convention. Not that anyone should care about the Iraqi army but the civilians died with them.
 
Jul 2014
31,044
7,937
midwest
#10
George Herbert Walker Bush is dead and buried with full honors as the 41st president of the United States. What we are told to remember about him is circulating on television, radio, newspapers and social media. Apparently he was great man who did great things like say we needed a kinder, gentler nation and no new taxes. I voted for Ross Perot to try and save the company pensions and affordable health insurance you no longer get.

The official narrative is awash with quaint references of bush being the “quiet”, unappreciated president who did no harm. The problem is I don’t have amnesia. An article in the New York Times on Sept. 23, 1990 pointed out that the invasion of Kuwait which resulted in the Gulf War began with Bush and his kinder, gentler approach to a menace named Saddam Hussein.

Hussein was rattling a sabre with 30,000 troops amassed on the Border of Kuwait. Bush dispatched April Glaspie, US Ambassador to Iraq on July 25, 1990 to meet with Hussein where she delivered a message. The message did not say, if you attack Kuwait we will intervene militarily. Glaspie delivered Bush’s message that the US wanted to maintain friendly relations with Iraq and was curious as to Saddam’s intentions.

Saddam was at the end of his rope because he was heavily in debt to Kuwait and Kuwait was producing oil at a high level cutting into Iraq’s revenues. Saddam was testing the waters when he announced to Glaspie that he fully intended to annex Kuwait under the pretext of it stealing his oil through slant drilling unless a solution could be reached.

Incredibly, Glaspie responded by saying that the US has no opinion on border disputes between Arab nations. Clearly Saddam understood this to mean that the US would not intervene; he promptly took Kuwait eight days later.

Students of history may recognize that this is the kind of lethal diplomatic incompetence that starts major wars and the Gulf war ensued ending with Saddam’s retreating troops mixed with civilians in Volkswagens being slaughtered on the highway of Death which enraged Arabs everywhere.

1993: Arab revenge attack # 1 on World Trade Center. 2001: attack #2 by agents of Saudi Arabia utterly destroys it. 2003: Bush’s son attacks Iraq which had no part in 9/11 obscuring a black mark on his father’s legacy.

Arabs still hate us; more attacks coming.

https://www.nytimes.com/1990/09/23/w...-us-envoy.html
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...040203485.html
https://foreignpolicy.com/2011/01/09...addam-hussein/
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/sk...d-kuwait-37237
https://www.history.com/topics/middl...rsian-gulf-war
I don't think he's "buried" just quite yet.