The harmeless president?

Dec 2013
11,501
12,393
Work
#24
Then hopefully we agree that it did not.

And who was going to stop Saddam from taking more of the region?

And he definitely wanted to, and would have, if we had not stood up to him.

He was not going to stop with just Kuwait...
We really don't know what he would have done after Kuwait, so it's rather pointless to hypothesize. The point is he was a very close ally until right before he invaded Iraq. So close that Iraq bombed a US warship ship a few years prior (the USS Stark), claimed it was a mistake and there were no repercussions. So close that Bush Sr didn't bring up the incident of Iraq gassing his own people because that happened while the US was a strategic ally, and the Reagan/Bush administration had lobbied hard to squash the bill in congress called the Prevention of Genocide Act of 1988 which was a direct response to the gassing. It would have looked awful strange for Bush to say "The gassing of the Kurds a year and a half ago that I said wasn't good enough reason to cut ties with Iraq or punish them in any real way is why we must invade."

That didn't stop his son though, and the media was all too helpful to not point out any embarrassing history of that gas attack.
 
Jul 2014
31,044
7,937
midwest
#25
We really don't know what he would have done after Kuwait, so it's rather pointless to hypothesize. The point is he was a very close ally until right before he invaded Iraq. So close that Iraq bombed a US warship ship a few years prior (the USS Stark), claimed it was a mistake and there were no repercussions. So close that Bush Sr didn't bring up the incident of Iraq gassing his own people because that happened while the US was a strategic ally, and the Reagan/Bush administration had lobbied hard to squash the bill in congress called the Prevention of Genocide Act of 1988 which was a direct response to the gassing. It would have looked awful strange for Bush to say "The gassing of the Kurds a year and a half ago that I said wasn't good enough reason to cut ties with Iraq or punish them in any real way is why we must invade."

That didn't stop his son though, and the media was all too helpful to not point out any embarrassing history of that gas attack.
Good examples.

And people are whining about our "friendship" with Saudi Arabia!

Double standard, anyone?

And, Saddam was NOT going to stop with Kuwait.
 
Apr 2012
55,158
40,033
Englewood,Ohio
#26
We really don't know what he would have done after Kuwait, so it's rather pointless to hypothesize. The point is he was a very close ally until right before he invaded Iraq. So close that Iraq bombed a US warship ship a few years prior (the USS Stark), claimed it was a mistake and there were no repercussions. So close that Bush Sr didn't bring up the incident of Iraq gassing his own people because that happened while the US was a strategic ally, and the Reagan/Bush administration had lobbied hard to squash the bill in congress called the Prevention of Genocide Act of 1988 which was a direct response to the gassing. It would have looked awful strange for Bush to say "The gassing of the Kurds a year and a half ago that I said wasn't good enough reason to cut ties with Iraq or punish them in any real way is why we must invade."

That didn't stop his son though, and the media was all too helpful to not point out any embarrassing history of that gas attack.
Never forget the hostage deal.
 
Oct 2018
682
479
WonderfulOregon
#30
Dad first...then jr. OIL OIL OIL

Shove over Iraq, the US is not only going to organize your new Iraq government council, but we are also going to stack it with Americas
===============
Iraq oil law (2007)
The Iraq Oil Law, also referred to as the Iraq Hydrocarbon Law was legislation submitted to the Iraqi Council of Representatives in May 2007.

Start of process

The legislation started when the U.S.-backed Iraqi cabinet approved a new oil law that was set to give foreign companies the long-term contracts and the safe legal framework they have been waiting for. But many felt their oil production should remain in the hands of Iraqis.

On March 10, 2007, prominent Iraqi parliamentarians, politicians, ex-ministers and oil technocrats urged the Baghdad parliament to reject Iraq's controversial hydrocarbon law, fearing that the new legislation would further divide the country already witnessing civil strife.[2]

On April 28, 2007, discussions turned contentious among the more than 60 Iraqi oil officials reviewing Iraq's draft hydrocarbons bill in the United Arab Emirates. But the dispute highlighted the need for further negotiations on the proposed law that was stalled in talks for nearly eight months, then pushed through Iraq's Cabinet without most key provisions.

By December 2, 2007, The G W Bush administration was concerned that recent security gains in Iraq may be undermined by continuing political gridlock, and started pushing the Iraqi government to complete long-delayed reform legislation within six months.

"New Oil Law Seen as Cover for Privatization" from the United States

On June 30, 2008, a group of American advisers led by a small U S Department team played an integral part in drawing up contracts between the Iraqi government and five major Western oil companies to develop some of the largest fields in Iraq American officials say.

In June 2008, the Iraqi Oil Ministry announced plans to go ahead with small one- or two-year no-bid contracts to Exxon Mobil, Shell, Total and BP — along with Chevron and smaller firms to service Iraq’s largest fields.[6] Several United States senators had criticized the deal, arguing it was hindering efforts to pass the hydrocarbon law.

By July 1, 2008, Iraq's government invited foreign firms Monday to help boost the production of the country's major oil fields, beginning a global competition for access to the world's third-largest reserves.

By February 2009, Iraq had "sweetened" the terms it was the offering international oil companies vying to develop the country’s reserves in the first concrete example of a global shift in power beginning to sweep through the oil industry.

Iraq, which pre-qualified about 45 companies to bid on oil projects, plans to award contracts for the six partly developed and four undeveloped fields offered in its second licensing round by mid-December.
History


The Bush administration hired the consulting firm BearingPoint to help write the law in 2004.
[ The bill was approved by the Iraqi cabinet in February 2007. The Bush administration considers the passage of the law a benchmark for the government of Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki.

One stumbling block was the unpopularity of the law by the Iraqi people.

An opinion poll conducted in 2007 by Oil Change International and other groups shows 63% of Iraqis surveyed would "prefer Iraq's oil to be developed and produced by Iraqi state-owned companies [than] by foreign companies". This explains why the law had stalled in the Iraqi parliament.

Profit sharing
The new law authorizes production share agreements (PSAs) which guarantees a profit for foreign oil companies.

The central government distributes remaining oil revenues throughout the nation on a per capita basis.

====================

Is it any wonder why the terrorist want to blow us up?