The last VCR to be manufactured this month - July 2016

Djinn

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Japan's Funai Electric, which claims to be the world's last VCR manufacturer, says it will cease production of the machines this month.

Funai started manufacturing video-cassette recorders in 1983, and at one point was selling 15 million units a year. Alas, the clunky VCR has since been replaced by an array of new technologies: DVDs, Blu-ray, and now, streaming video services.
The last VCR will be manufactured this month - Jul. 22, 2016

As someone who grew up in the 1980s, I doff my hat in respect for the technology that brought video recording to the masses.
 
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Jan 2016
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The last VCR will be manufactured this month - Jul. 22, 2016

As someone who grew up in the 1980s, I doff my hat in respect for the technology that brought video recording to the masses.
Well, I wonder about this. SOME companies out there still make DVD Recorders, which often INCLUDE a VCR in the machine, so that people can copy their old video-tapes to DVDs. I would think that SOME company will be continuing to make those machines in the future....
 

Ian Jeffrey

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My old VCR is hooked up to my computer. Unfortunately, I have to reinstall the software since I upgraded my OS from Win8 to Win8.1.
 

Djinn

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Dec 2007
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Pennsylvania, USA
Damn kids today don't remember when a paused video looked like this:



Nor will they know the meaning of "Please be kind... Rewind!"
 
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Macduff

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If I were a VCR manufacturer, I'd tell hipsters that the picture and sound quality on a VCR is "warmer" and more "genuine" than digital. They're stupidly pretentious enough to believe it. Look at all of them who go on about how the sound quality is better on vinyl even though they don't own stereo equipment good enough to tell the difference.
 
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If I were a VCR manufacturer, I'd tell hipsters that the picture and sound quality on a VCR is "warmer" and more "genuine" than digital. They're stupidly pretentious enough to believe it. Look at all of them who go on about how the sound quality is better on vinyl even though they don't own stereo equipment good enough to tell the difference.
What? Vinyl is superior!

Anyway, I suddenly want a new VCR. I don't like things going away.
 

jacobfitcher

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Nov 2014
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If I were a VCR manufacturer, I'd tell hipsters that the picture and sound quality on a VCR is "warmer" and more "genuine" than digital. They're stupidly pretentious enough to believe it. Look at all of them who go on about how the sound quality is better on vinyl even though they don't own stereo equipment good enough to tell the difference.
I'm of the opinion that if the original recording was analogue, then vinyl is best. If it was digital, it makes no difference.
 
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I know I shall be considered a Philistine for saying this, but by 'vinyl', I assume one means an LP record - complete with pops, cracks, and attendant hiss. If that's a warm, genuine sound, I can only assume people have never heard music performed 'live'. :ambivalence:

CDs and digital music have been around since long before I was born, and I have seen the performance entailed in wiping records, setting up cartridges and 'dust bugs', and all the histrionics involved in playing a 20 minute long piece of music. I suppose the original bakelite recordings, played by means of pins and brass horns were more cumbersome, but not, I expect, by much. :D

In addition to all that - a vinyl record only renders maximum fidelity the first time it is played. Thereafter it wears, and gains extraneous hiss and pops from dust and abrasion with each performance. And as MacDuff points out few people own high fidelity sound reproducing equipment of sufficient quality to tell the difference of the original recorded sound.

I don't understand the cult status LPs seem to have acquired - mainly amongst the crumblies, but many faddish younger people are being drawn into the spurious mystique. :ddsmilie_awe:
 
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