The one thing this country misses is simple logic

Mar 2015
2,156
667
Minnesota
#1
Yup, why should me and my neighbors have to pay for people to keep a roof over their family and food on their table when the two adults are both working 40 hours and need food stamps and other support to survive. So business can make more money, why is it my responsibility to have to pay for their golden profits.$15 an hour is a start but it always has to be enough to feed a family no matter what the wage level is. Who in the hell saves money at wall-mart if they have to pay for one of their workers to survive. That what the right want for this country , it's just another way to hand everything they can to the wealthy and big B. It's some more of that trickle down nonsense.
 
Nov 2015
2,723
836
UK
#2
People are using the likes of Wal-Mart etc.. thus placing those large corporations in the market at the top making millions/billions whilst Joe public suffer.

If people were concerned, they would do such things as grow food and/or purchase from local farmers/growers, as an example.

How should welfare work? Does society help their fellow men or say, "Feck them, it's a dog eat cat world", then what will happen to such things as crime and health? There will never be a fair for all system.
 
Sep 2017
3,951
4,877
Massachusetts
#3
Yup, why should me and my neighbors have to pay for people to keep a roof over their family and food on their table when the two adults are both working 40 hours and need food stamps and other support to survive. So business can make more money, why is it my responsibility to have to pay for their golden profits.$15 an hour is a start but it always has to be enough to feed a family no matter what the wage level is. Who in the hell saves money at wall-mart if they have to pay for one of their workers to survive. That what the right want for this country , it's just another way to hand everything they can to the wealthy and big B. It's some more of that trickle down nonsense.
I agree with what you're saying, but one issue I see is that this rhetoric tends to lead to focusing on just a few big name companies (Wal-Mart, Amazon), as if shaming (or regulating) a few large corporations into doing better is going to fundamentally change the lay of the land. Yet, in my experience, small businesses can actually be a whole lot worse for employees. Consider the following:

(1) At a big employer, even if you start out in a terrible job, there's the very real opportunity to distinguish yourself and move up, almost without limit. My wife, for example, started at a small company as a receptionist earning so little that she was falling deeper into debt every month just to live, and now, years later, she's a regional manager pulling down $150k per year. Small employers are often family businesses, where you're permanently screwed unless you're family. At best, if you bust your ass, you'll move up into some lower-middle-management position where you'll work like a dog for the rest of your career so that some nephew of the boss can spend his days golfing and taking credit for your work.

(2) At a big employer, you benefit from pretty much every labor protection out there -- the FMLA, the ADA, the insurance mandates of Obamacare, etc. Small employers tend to be legally permitted to screw you in all sorts of ways that their bigger counterparts can't.

(3) At a big employer, you generally get better benefits, since they have the bulk-buying power to get more value for their employees at any given price. For example, even if a small employer provides insurance to its employees, it'll typically come at a higher price or with less coverage than a comparable big employer would provide.

So, to the extent this kind of critique winds up focused exclusively on big companies (while, for example, we're meant to see smaller, local businesses as the virtuous alternative), we could well be hurting workers. Better to focus on setting minimum floors beneath which no employer, regardless of size, is allowed to fall -- or, alternately, shift to providing more benefits directly from government.
 
Mar 2015
2,156
667
Minnesota
#4
The small company con is a joke ,some as high as 35.5 million in sales and up to 1500 people working for them, that is in no way small. I used Wall -mart as the obvious example and your story about your wife moving up the ladder is buried underneath the fact that since 1981 adjusted for inflation . Workers wages haven't gone up. During the largest increase in corporate profit in history. I don't mean a small increase its 10 times more then it was in 1981. Every dime went to the golden few at the top. AS the right had planned. To repeat myself, no one working 40 hours a week should get paid a sub livable amount. If they did then the tax payer wouldn't be paying to support their family the business would instead.
 
Sep 2013
38,771
30,743
On a hill
#5
People are using the likes of Wal-Mart etc.. thus placing those large corporations in the market at the top making millions/billions whilst Joe public suffer.

If people were concerned, they would do such things as grow food and/or purchase from local farmers/growers, as an example.

How should welfare work? Does society help their fellow men or say, "Feck them, it's a dog eat cat world", then what will happen to such things as crime and health? There will never be a fair for all system.
California allows food stamp recipients to shop at farmers markets.

Impact | Market Match
 
Jan 2014
14,865
3,687
California
#6
Yup, why should me and my neighbors have to pay for people to keep a roof over their family and food on their table when the two adults are both working 40 hours and need food stamps and other support to survive. So business can make more money, why is it my responsibility to have to pay for their golden profits.$15 an hour is a start but it always has to be enough to feed a family no matter what the wage level is. Who in the hell saves money at wall-mart if they have to pay for one of their workers to survive. That what the right want for this country , it's just another way to hand everything they can to the wealthy and big B. It's some more of that trickle down nonsense.
Mr. bander,

I don't know if the country so much misses it, but this top post definitely misses logical flow in lieu of a random stream of words.