The Prince kissed Snow White without consent?

Nov 2006
53,401
19,533
#83
No, that was just SD's example. But yes, the not-cooking part prevents us from making coffee in the normal way, so we use instant.
Are you not still cooking the water to make that instant? You could make enough and stick it in the fridge and have ice coffee couldn't you?

And if you can boil water for instant why can't you boil water and use a french press?
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
72,228
40,318
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#84
Are you not still cooking the water to make that instant?
Not boiling the water on Shabbat. Rather, some people get hot water urns and boil it before Shabbat. I do not have one ... could get one, but I have just never gotten around to it.
You could make enough and stick it in the fridge and have ice coffee couldn't you?
Of course, but I am not a fan of iced coffee (unless a mocha or cappuccino or something like that).
And if you can boil water for instant why can't you boil water and use a french press?
Even with the hot water we would have, a French press would not be usable on Shabbat, as it involves (at least?) one of the 39 melachos.
 
Likes: Coyote
Jul 2011
3,414
4,966
UK/Australia
#85
"Bowdler."

It is a classic Disney story. Disney's version just is not the original, obviously. But then, few of them are IIRC.
I must respectfully beg to differ Ian. The Disney presentation of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is a plagiarised version of the original story published by the Brothers Grimm in the 19th century. The initial plagiarism was of the Grimm brothers' Sneewittchen, by Winthrop Ames when he wrote the play Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (AFIK, without accrediting the Grimm brothers,) under the pseudonym 'Jessie Graham White' in 1912. Disney based his film upon that plagiarised version.

We all know that the Disney version was bowdlerised to suit the imagined sensibilities of children, but the basic elements of the story remain the same, and could not, by any stretch of the imagination, be considered a classic tale originating within the Disney organisation (a claim which ignores the plagiarised version by Winthrop Ames, for starters).