The radio said they are just deportees: Alabama's tough new immigrant law

Dec 2010
36,825
28,616
Virginia
#1
By Pamela Constable, Published: October 8
Foley, Ala. — Trailer by trailer, yard sale by yard sale, and pew by empty pew, a poor but tightknit immigrant community on Alabama’s breezy Gulf Coast is rapidly disintegrating.

This time it is not a tornado or hurricane uprooting families and scattering them to the winds. It is a new state law, largely upheld last week by a federal district judge, that seeks to drive illegal immigrants from the state by curtailing many of their rights, punishing anyone who knowingly employs, houses or assists them, and requiring schools and police to verify immigrants’ legal status.

Other states, including Arizona, Georgia and Colorado, have passed similar laws in the past several years in a growing trend by state legislatures to crack down on illegal immigration within their borders in the absence of comprehensive federal action. But Alabama’s new law is the toughest passed so far, and it is the only one to withstand federal lawsuits and other legal challenges, allowing it to take virtually full effect.

A tough new Alabama law targets illegal immigrants and sends families fleeing - The Washington Post

So, the question is this: will this law really cause employers to pay more for help?
According to the article the answer is no. "Republican lawmakers said they want to bolster the national guest worker program to return to an orderly legal flow of foreign field laborers, but a number of farm owners interviewed last week said that the program was cumbersome and inadequate and that they could not find local American workers willing to toil long hours in hot fields.

“There is a lot of heavy lifting and manual labor, and you are out there in the sun and the rain. It is just not attractive to Americans,” said Mac Higginbotham, an official with the Alabama Farmers Federation.

The group represents about 40,000 farmers and opposed the new immigration law.

“We have people losing 40 to 60 percent of their crops this season,” Higginbotham said. “The law is affecting everyone.”


Should we, then encourage illegal immigration? It seems that the business answer, in Alabama (a deep RED state) is yes. Funny how it works out that the people who most despise illegals are the most dependent upon them.
 
Jul 2011
35,422
3,069
Tennessee
#3
By Pamela Constable, Published: October 8
Foley, Ala. — Trailer by trailer, yard sale by yard sale, and pew by empty pew, a poor but tightknit immigrant community on Alabama’s breezy Gulf Coast is rapidly disintegrating.

This time it is not a tornado or hurricane uprooting families and scattering them to the winds. It is a new state law, largely upheld last week by a federal district judge, that seeks to drive illegal immigrants from the state by curtailing many of their rights, punishing anyone who knowingly employs, houses or assists them, and requiring schools and police to verify immigrants’ legal status.

Other states, including Arizona, Georgia and Colorado, have passed similar laws in the past several years in a growing trend by state legislatures to crack down on illegal immigration within their borders in the absence of comprehensive federal action. But Alabama’s new law is the toughest passed so far, and it is the only one to withstand federal lawsuits and other legal challenges, allowing it to take virtually full effect.

A tough new Alabama law targets illegal immigrants and sends families fleeing - The Washington Post

So, the question is this: will this law really cause employers to pay more for help?
According to the article the answer is no. "Republican lawmakers said they want to bolster the national guest worker program to return to an orderly legal flow of foreign field laborers, but a number of farm owners interviewed last week said that the program was cumbersome and inadequate and that they could not find local American workers willing to toil long hours in hot fields.

“There is a lot of heavy lifting and manual labor, and you are out there in the sun and the rain. It is just not attractive to Americans,” said Mac Higginbotham, an official with the Alabama Farmers Federation.

The group represents about 40,000 farmers and opposed the new immigration law.

“We have people losing 40 to 60 percent of their crops this season,” Higginbotham said. “The law is affecting everyone.”


Should we, then encourage illegal immigration? It seems that the business answer, in Alabama (a deep RED state) is yes. Funny how it works out that the people who most despise illegals are the most dependent upon them.
the very BLUE state of cali like the illegals too.
 
Dec 2010
36,825
28,616
Virginia
#4
the very BLUE state of cali like the illegals too.
CPC 834(b) pretty much mirrors the Arizona law.
So, the point is what, that people who despise illegals in California also depend on them? This makes my point invalid, how?
 

jackalope

Former Staff
Jan 2010
51,139
17,672
Maine
#5
...
So, the question is this: will this law really cause employers to pay more for help?
According to the article the answer is no. "Republican lawmakers said they want to bolster the national guest worker program to return to an orderly legal flow of foreign field laborers, but a number of farm owners interviewed last week said that the program was cumbersome and inadequate and that they could not find local American workers willing to toil long hours in hot fields.

“There is a lot of heavy lifting and manual labor, and you are out there in the sun and the rain. It is just not attractive to Americans,” said Mac Higginbotham, an official with the Alabama Farmers Federation.
....

I didn't understand this part. Why does bolstering the nat'l guest worker program sound like a bad idea to local farm owners?


Wouldn't they want that?
 
Jul 2011
35,422
3,069
Tennessee
#6
CPC 834(b) pretty much mirrors the Arizona law.
So, the point is what, that people who despise illegals in California also depend on them? This makes my point invalid, how?
you politicize your argument when you said this, "....in Alabama (a deep RED state) is yes", as in making it a democrat vs republican thing.
 
Dec 2010
36,825
28,616
Virginia
#7
you politicize your argument when you said this, "....in Alabama (a deep RED state) is yes", as in making it a democrat vs republican thing.
The point was that the popular sentiment in Alabama is strongly anti illegal alien, and that this is a stance the right has openly advocated for decades. The right, as in the "pro-business, get government out of the way and let business do whatever the hell they want" party seems to have missed the boat on this issue. Apparently business in Alabama has been breaking the law and making a profit doing so. Now the people got their wish, illegals are fleeing the state and, guess what? Farmers are letting the crops rot because they can't get Americans to work for the money they're willing to pay. Gosh, if only someone had KNOWN that this would be the result...oh wait, they did and it wasn't the right.
 
Jul 2011
35,422
3,069
Tennessee
#9
The point was that the popular sentiment in Alabama is strongly anti illegal alien, and that this is a stance the right has openly advocated for decades. The right, as in the "pro-business, get government out of the way and let business do whatever the hell they want" party seems to have missed the boat on this issue. Apparently business in Alabama has been breaking the law and making a profit doing so. Now the people got their wish, illegals are fleeing the state and, guess what? Farmers are letting the crops rot because they can't get Americans to work for the money they're willing to pay. Gosh, if only someone had KNOWN that this would be the result...oh wait, they did and it wasn't the right.
let's be honest here. this thread is nothing more than your continued bitching against the right. you could care less about illegals in this country. political opportunity for you.

we do need a program to bring immigrants into this country to do this work, but washington can't agree on how to do it.

the fact is, if they were not picking our fruits and vegetable, we would be importing them.

futher more, alabama and other states don't want to be the next california.
 

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