The restaurant industry ran a private poll on the minimum wage...

Sep 2013
44,420
35,458
On a hill
#1
Lisa Graves, Zaid Jilani

April 17 2018, 7:39 p.m.

ONE OF THE NATION’S most powerful anti-minimum wage lobbying groups tapped a long-time Republican pollster to survey the public about a range of issues impacting the industry.

A significant chunk of the survey focused on attitudes toward the minimum wage — and many members of the powerful lobby group aren’t going to like the results.

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Conducted by GOP pollster Frank Luntz’s firm LuntzGlobal on behalf of the other NRA — the National Restaurant Association — the poll found that 71 percent of people surveyed support raising the minimum wage to at least $10 an hour.

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“The restaurant industry now in the United States is larger than 90 percent of the world economies,” said Hudson Riehle, senior vice president of the NRA’s Research and Knowledge group.

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One of the arguments routinely made by industry representatives is that raising the minimum wage will raise the costs for customers. But, the NRA’s own poll shows that, by an overwhelming majority, customers are willing to pay more to support a “fair wage.”

In the words of LuntzGlobal: “They want the INCREASE in spite of the costs.”

https://theintercept.com/2018/04/17...the-minimum-wage-it-did-not-go-well-for-them/
 
Mar 2012
56,188
37,762
New Hampshire
#3
I think $10 is probably fair for the federal wage. $15 is probably too high for many areas. But I do know from having family members that work in restaurants, that few make that at all. Many only make $2 an hour and make the rest in tips. We have a high brow steakhouse nearby and last year they announced they would begin paying servers a full wage of $12 an hour. A year later, the servers were upset since many customers then stopped tipping. I think a lot of this is relative. If one lives in downtown Seattle, LA, NYC etc and they eat out, people generally tip well and expect pay is decent. But in some areas, you dont see that. Tipping drops off and you hear a lot of "I only make $15 an hour as a machinist, why should they make that?" So thats problematic.
 
Likes: 1 person
Sep 2013
44,420
35,458
On a hill
#4
I think $10 is probably fair for the federal wage. $15 is probably too high for many areas. But I do know from having family members that work in restaurants, that few make that at all. Many only make $2 an hour and make the rest in tips. We have a high brow steakhouse nearby and last year they announced they would begin paying servers a full wage of $12 an hour. A year later, the servers were upset since many customers then stopped tipping. I think a lot of this is relative. If one lives in downtown Seattle, LA, NYC etc and they eat out, people generally tip well and expect pay is decent. But in some areas, you dont see that. Tipping drops off and you hear a lot of "I only make $15 an hour as a machinist, why should they make that?" So thats problematic.
In other words, engaged in scrambling for scraps from the masters table.
 
Mar 2012
56,188
37,762
New Hampshire
#5
In other words, engaged in scrambling for scraps from the masters table.
Well yea. I dont know if you ever worked in the service industry or had family there, but there is definitely a "vibe" by some in relation to it. Some people are just mean and figure you are there to serve them. They dont tip and are rude and condescending. They dont care if you are working to get a PhD, they just figure, "serve me." My daughter used to tell me stories about people that tipped and those who didnt. It was amazing. Its also an industry where tips are normally more than their income so they take it very seriously. Where she worked the owner gave the servers the choice, either pay a full wage or continue to pay $2.35 or whatever it was at the time. The servers opted for the $2 because they knew from their clientele they would lose tips.
 
Sep 2013
44,420
35,458
On a hill
#6
Well yea. I dont know if you ever worked in the service industry or had family there, but there is definitely a "vibe" by some in relation to it. Some people are just mean and figure you are there to serve them. They dont tip and are rude and condescending. They dont care if you are working to get a PhD, they just figure, "serve me." My daughter used to tell me stories about people that tipped and those who didnt. It was amazing. Its also an industry where tips are normally more than their income so they take it very seriously. Where she worked the owner gave the servers the choice, either pay a full wage or continue to pay $2.35 or whatever it was at the time. The servers opted for the $2 because they knew from their clientele they would lose tips.
I had a friend from high school who worked in restaurants while in college, so ive heard stories.

History of tipping:

Restaurants and rail operators, notably Pullman, embraced tipping primarily, Jayaraman says, because it enabled them to save money by hiring newly freed slaves to work for tips alone. Plenty of Americans frowned upon the practice, and a union-led movement begat bans on tipping in several states. The fervor spread to Europe, too, before fizzling in the United States—by 1926, the state tipping bans had been repealed.

https://www.motherjones.com/environ...tipping-racist-origins-saru-jayaraman-forked/
 
Likes: 1 person
Jun 2014
47,223
47,190
United States
#7
Well yea. I dont know if you ever worked in the service industry or had family there, but there is definitely a "vibe" by some in relation to it. Some people are just mean and figure you are there to serve them. They dont tip and are rude and condescending. They dont care if you are working to get a PhD, they just figure, "serve me." My daughter used to tell me stories about people that tipped and those who didnt. It was amazing. Its also an industry where tips are normally more than their income so they take it very seriously. Where she worked the owner gave the servers the choice, either pay a full wage or continue to pay $2.35 or whatever it was at the time. The servers opted for the $2 because they knew from their clientele they would lose tips.

Well, if you're in the hospitality industry, then by definition, you are there to serve the customers, and tipping is optional. I also find it hard to believe that customers are less likely to tip employees in response to their base hourly income. Customers have no way of knowing what their servers are paid. I have heard of some restaurants that increased hourly pay and banned tipping altogether, but they also put up notices to that effect inside the restaurants.


BTW: I am of the opinion that the federal minimum wage should be increased immediately to $12.50 per hour.
 
Jul 2014
38,922
33,908
Border Fence
#8
Well yea. I dont know if you ever worked in the service industry or had family there, but there is definitely a "vibe" by some in relation to it. Some people are just mean and figure you are there to serve them. They dont tip and are rude and condescending. They dont care if you are working to get a PhD, they just figure, "serve me." My daughter used to tell me stories about people that tipped and those who didnt. It was amazing. Its also an industry where tips are normally more than their income so they take it very seriously. Where she worked the owner gave the servers the choice, either pay a full wage or continue to pay $2.35 or whatever it was at the time. The servers opted for the $2 because they knew from their clientele they would lose tips.
Fast food usually don't have food servers. Even paying 12$ an hour is low since most food servers don't work 8 hour shifts.

paying 12$ for a 3 hour shift is no different that 7.35 or 2.35...servers operate off tips.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
105,974
95,997
Most Insidious
#9
Well yea. I dont know if you ever worked in the service industry or had family there, but there is definitely a "vibe" by some in relation to it. Some people are just mean and figure you are there to serve them. They dont tip and are rude and condescending. They dont care if you are working to get a PhD, they just figure, "serve me." My daughter used to tell me stories about people that tipped and those who didnt. It was amazing. Its also an industry where tips are normally more than their income so they take it very seriously. Where she worked the owner gave the servers the choice, either pay a full wage or continue to pay $2.35 or whatever it was at the time. The servers opted for the $2 because they knew from their clientele they would lose tips.
I know I'm in the minority here, but this is another case where I'm at a disadvantage based on region. Washington State has the same minimum wage whether the employee is in a tipped or untipped position. In fact, so does Oregon and I believe California too. I've lived in different places out here but don't believe I've ever lived in a locale where the minimum wage is in the $2 range plus tips. Even when the employee is required to be guaranteed to make at least the minimum wage when wage + tip is included, that just seems weird.

I feel like the restaurant doing that should post a sign at the entrance noting that "Tipping is encouraged as a way to support our failed business model."