The restaurant industry ran a private poll on the minimum wage...

Mar 2019
3,285
1,687
"US" of A
Used to be there was an honor system among employers who wanted to keep employees who did a good job so they gave them raises.

Small businesses still do that, but we've got so few left people have just become used to working in places where they're shown no respect and literally everyone who works there hates their job. They lie and say they don't, but they do.


That's what happens when an ostensibly free people collectively wait too long to speak up. It becomes the norm and not isolated to "a" job. Sure. Go change jobs. Move if you have to. Plop the kids into a new school if you must. Go through all of that.

You're/I'm/we're going to pick up on "that thing", that future lack of respect over time after all the effort and good work you/I/we put in, in the next interview process that you/I/we missed last time?

I don't think it's a/the job. I think it's jobs these days, lucky if you're not in that position. Flatlined worker wages versus massive gains in worker productivity going all the way back to the early 1970s and the Powell Memorandum explain the trajectory and the policy that drove it. The Trilateral Commission publication A Crisis of Democracy further illustrates the orchestration.
 
Sep 2013
46,155
37,246
On a hill
Used to be there was an honor system among employers who wanted to keep employees who did a good job so they gave them raises.

Small businesses still do that, but we've got so few left people have just become used to working in places where they're shown no respect and literally everyone who works there hates their job. They lie and say they don't, but they do.
This story should be told in every business school.

NUMMI - This American Life
 

CtC

Mar 2019
9,950
3,427
California
They don't tell the female employees what they're paying the men, no.
The question was "Do Employers tell Employees how much THEY will make"? What OTHERS make is none of their bloody business. Like I said. When one becomes financially viable ,by LEARNING a valuable SKILL , good paying Jobs are not hard to find.
 
Feb 2011
18,516
13,297
The formerly great golden state
The question was "Do Employers tell Employees how much THEY will make"? What OTHERS make is none of their bloody business. Like I said. When one becomes financially viable ,by LEARNING a valuable SKILL , good paying Jobs are not hard to find.
I see. So, you were asking an irrelevant question. I thought maybe you had miss stated. Why would you ask this?
 
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Rasselas

Moderator
Feb 2010
71,555
48,661
USA
I think $10 is probably fair for the federal wage. $15 is probably too high for many areas. But I do know from having family members that work in restaurants, that few make that at all. Many only make $2 an hour and make the rest in tips. We have a high brow steakhouse nearby and last year they announced they would begin paying servers a full wage of $12 an hour. A year later, the servers were upset since many customers then stopped tipping. I think a lot of this is relative. If one lives in downtown Seattle, LA, NYC etc and they eat out, people generally tip well and expect pay is decent. But in some areas, you dont see that. Tipping drops off and you hear a lot of "I only make $15 an hour as a machinist, why should they make that?" So thats problematic.
If we just raised the pay of servers to the minimum wage (and raised it to $10) as you suggest, the tipping thing might not be a problem. Servers in restaurants in CA make the same minimum as everyone else, but Californians still tip.

Tipping servers is actually a rare thing, worldwide. In most countries servers make a decent wage (above the minimum in most cases) and tipping customs call for simply leaving the change to the next Euro other currency.
 

Rasselas

Moderator
Feb 2010
71,555
48,661
USA
West coast wealth.
But we have high levels of inequality, so that's only half an answer.

The cost of a lunch entree in a restaurant near me is about $8-9. Dinner will set you back $10-15. These are in lower-end places. A place like Olive Garden will be more like $15-17. How much is it in Alaska?
 
Feb 2011
17,040
6,084
Boise, ID
But we have high levels of inequality, so that's only half an answer.

The cost of a lunch entree in a restaurant near me is about $8-9. Dinner will set you back $10-15. These are in lower-end places. A place like Olive Garden will be more like $15-17. How much is it in Alaska?
I've lived in places where a low-quality large pizza sets you back $30.

I'm not totally disagreeing with boontito or you. All sorts of business owners can do well in bustling economies, assuming they're doing the various necessities about running a business the right way, building reputation, marketing well, selling a quality/desired product/service, etc. But a lot of that success is also owed to the strength of the overall economy which provides an abundance of customers. Try to start any business in an economically decimated place. It'll be nothing but a money pit. But that's part of why the sky doesn't fall for restaurant owners when the minimum wage inches upward. It affects the competition the same way at the same time, and assuming there are enough people there with money that they're willing to eat out occasionally, the demand doesn't swing wildly based on small price fluctuations.
 
Jan 2014
18,368
5,261
California
What makes West Coast restaurant owners such superior businesspersons that they can successfully pay their employees the full minimum wage and not only keep their restaurants open but still make a profit? :D
Mr. boontito,

Lots of illegals to work in the kitchen for next to nothing.