The restaurant industry ran a private poll on the minimum wage...

Oct 2013
14,203
12,955
Sweden
Kontrary, I generally cannot afford to eat in table service places; but when I do, I'm a straight 20% (on the gross bill w/tax), cash tipper. The math is easy. I was pleased to learn that my children follow my example because I never instructed them about tipping.
I generally slip it to the server, but even if I leave it on the table, the server or the busboy got the cash in hand.

You post like a server. What kind of places do you work in? I thought my 20% was on the more generous side and servers would be delighted if total shifts' tips averaged nearly 15%?

Respectfully, Supposn
Hi, sorry it took so long to reply....currently I am doing an education program and working as a server. I average 20% to 25% on tips generally. Overall, people are generous and good. I actually love serving, I just dont like the hours. I have also gotten some amazing tips...I had a couple give me $100 bill and told to keep the rest, their bill was $42.

The hourly wage for a server would most likely mean a pay cut and there is no way I would work the busy shifts for the same rate as a slow shift if the hourly wage was the same. The other night...a basic slow night I worked 5 hours and made $90 in tips and $7.50 an hour....thats about $24 per hour BUT I wont get 40 hours nor would that rate be the same for all 40 hours.
 
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Oct 2013
14,203
12,955
Sweden
Yea we have a small local chain and they decided to stop tipping. They offered a better starting wage and the servers went beserk. One even announced on tv that she liked tips "because she didnt always declare them on her taxes." lol
There are downsides to not claiming all your tips (and you end up claiming most anyway because employers pressure to claim at least 15% of your total sales and credit card tips are automatically claimed).... the downsides are about establishing credit, showing you make enough to afford loans, apts etc that you seek, your contribution to SS etc.

There are upsides too of course...there are single mothers barely getting by and that small amount they dont claim helps them gain health care, food stamps etc...help they really need and claiming an extra $30 per week would disqualify them.

The struggle in the US is very real....people have to struggle to get things that people in Sweden have unfettered access to.
 
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Mar 2012
58,635
40,148
New Hampshire
I wonder just what percentage of the cost of a new car is represented by the cost of labor? It must be a lot lower than it used to be due to automation. Less, therefore, is saved by moving the factory to a lower wage country.
You also arent factoring in legacy costs. Those retired. We live way longer these days so all the companies and unions must pay pensions and benefits for a very long time after they are retired. That factors into the costs.
 
Apr 2014
38,699
24,977
Maryland
I think $10 is probably fair for the federal wage. $15 is probably too high for many areas. But I do know from having family members that work in restaurants, that few make that at all. Many only make $2 an hour and make the rest in tips. We have a high brow steakhouse nearby and last year they announced they would begin paying servers a full wage of $12 an hour. A year later, the servers were upset since many customers then stopped tipping. I think a lot of this is relative. If one lives in downtown Seattle, LA, NYC etc and they eat out, people generally tip well and expect pay is decent. But in some areas, you dont see that. Tipping drops off and you hear a lot of "I only make $15 an hour as a machinist, why should they make that?" So thats problematic.
So much depends on where you work. For example years ago I noticed that the expensive steak houses all had male waiters and the diners had mostly female servers.the steak houses had bills are over $100 and if one tips 20% they get $20. But the diner has a bill of $15. She’ll get $3 .
My daughter was a server in an upscale restaurant and actually made more than she did teaching.
 
Feb 2011
18,516
13,297
The formerly great golden state
You also arent factoring in legacy costs. Those retired. We live way longer these days so all the companies and unions must pay pensions and benefits for a very long time after they are retired. That factors into the costs.
It does factor into the labor costs, but the labor costs are going down due to automation.
 
Mar 2012
58,635
40,148
New Hampshire
It does factor into the labor costs, but the labor costs are going down due to automation.
But not as much as they normally would. Plus lets not forget, healthcare costs still account for a ton of the cost. Some companies claim it could be 40% of the costs.
 
Feb 2011
18,516
13,297
The formerly great golden state
But not as much as they normally would. Plus lets not forget, healthcare costs still account for a ton of the cost. Some companies claim it could be 40% of the costs.
No doubt it is a huge part of the costs. As long as we still have the most expensive health care on Earth, it will continue to be a drag on industry.
 
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Sep 2012
4,105
4,159
California
Lisa Graves, Zaid Jilani

April 17 2018, 7:39 p.m.

ONE OF THE NATION’S most powerful anti-minimum wage lobbying groups tapped a long-time Republican pollster to survey the public about a range of issues impacting the industry.

A significant chunk of the survey focused on attitudes toward the minimum wage — and many members of the powerful lobby group aren’t going to like the results.

snip

Conducted by GOP pollster Frank Luntz’s firm LuntzGlobal on behalf of the other NRA — the National Restaurant Association — the poll found that 71 percent of people surveyed support raising the minimum wage to at least $10 an hour.

snip

“The restaurant industry now in the United States is larger than 90 percent of the world economies,” said Hudson Riehle, senior vice president of the NRA’s Research and Knowledge group.

snip

One of the arguments routinely made by industry representatives is that raising the minimum wage will raise the costs for customers. But, the NRA’s own poll shows that, by an overwhelming majority, customers are willing to pay more to support a “fair wage.”

In the words of LuntzGlobal: “They want the INCREASE in spite of the costs.”

The Restaurant Industry Ran a Private Poll on the Minimum Wage. It Did Not Go Well for Them.
Just pay them a good wage and lets rid ourselves of tipping.
 
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Sep 2012
4,105
4,159
California
I know I'm in the minority here, but this is another case where I'm at a disadvantage based on region. Washington State has the same minimum wage whether the employee is in a tipped or untipped position. In fact, so does Oregon and I believe California too. I've lived in different places out here but don't believe I've ever lived in a locale where the minimum wage is in the $2 range plus tips. Even when the employee is required to be guaranteed to make at least the minimum wage when wage + tip is included, that just seems weird.

I feel like the restaurant doing that should post a sign at the entrance noting that "Tipping is encouraged as a way to support our failed business model."
Pretty sure Texas is 2-3 bucks an hour for a tipped position, daughter confirms this, lives in Austin.