Today's trip to the bookstore...

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
78,036
47,793
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
You respect your religious traditions and you refuse to read digital on shabbat. What supplementary dimension does it bring to your life? And for what an end do you refrain from doing things which did not exist at the times these rules were set? Is it possible to project a tradition in the future when you live in a totally different background from the one in which your forefathers were during generations?
Shabbat observance, as a Torah command, is an end in itself. However, it is pleasant and refreshing to disconnect from the electronic world and reconnect with the real people world on Shabbat and Jewish holidays (Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot are approaching in about 1-1/2 weeks).
I share with you the pleasure to read real books and digital has not the same taste for me...
Very cool.
 
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Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
78,036
47,793
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
But am sure Attorney’s have collected Law Books.
Too many - and they are typically not re-read. They are not good for case research, and that is the majority of what they are. The only ones worth keeping are those designed for research in the first place, and even then they are only helpful as a starting point. They are really only good to show, and no one really cares about that much anymore (especially as my office is in my living room and clients do not come here).
There excellent Israeli writers, do you read them in Hebrew?
I read in English, because much of what I read is either high-level Jewish philosophy; or the Talmud, in which the Gemara is not written in Hebrew, anyway.
 
Sep 2013
47,074
38,430
On a hill
You are right, there are books you never read again. What I do is to bring them to an abandoned phone booth. We have many in my country because everyone has a mobile phone. They are often just close to the post office and people can pick what books they want.
We have much the same thing.

Little Free Library
 
Jul 2013
58,942
65,488
Nashville, TN
My Kindle account:
Showing 1 - 126 of 779 items in Books--All
Not counting the vast number of books I have "borrowed" using my Kindle Unlimited account.
 
Jan 2016
57,388
54,207
Colorado
... yielded the following:

View attachment 27320

Most I had previously owned & read, some I have not yet read. Looking forward to adding these to the pile, thence their proper places on the shelf. Most of these are part of rebuilding the paperback collection that had been pared down at the behest of the now-ex-wife. Obviously, I made the wrong choice, since I ended up without the books and without the wife. Well ... good riddance to her, and I continue on my rebuilding voyage.
I assume you have read Foundation and Earth before!! It is the real culmination of the Foundation saga, though I think Asimov had planned one more book in the series. I was enthralled with Prelude to Foundation and disappointed with Foundation and Chaos.

I like Greg Bear as a sci-fi author, and I think have recommended him before to you. IIRC, you have not yet read anything by him. I do think he has written much better books than Eon, though.

The ONLY Gerrold novel I have read is When Harlie Was One. I should probably try another one by him.
 
Jan 2016
57,388
54,207
Colorado
Prepare for a shock ... I have never read any of the Dune books. No particular reason ... just haven't gotten 'round to them, yet.
I WAS shocked by this! As a stand-alone novel, Dune is, in my opinion, the SINGLE best science fiction novel ever written. You know how much I esteem Asimov's Foundation series, and really his whole 'future history', which incorporated MOST of his novels. But there is nothing quite like Dune. And the whole series of Dune novels forms a future history that is probably just as compelling as Asimov's future history.
 
Jan 2016
57,388
54,207
Colorado
I loved all the Asimov books:: The Robot Series; Foundation etc. Are you an Arthur C. Clarke fan at all?
Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke are my two favorite authors from what most people think of as 'the Golden Age' of science fiction, from the 1950's through the 1980's.

I think Clarke was at his best, not in the 2001: A Space Odyssey novel and its sequels, but in the Rama series, which begins with Rendezvous with Rama. And I am amazed to this day that no one has ever tried to make a GREAT science fiction film out of that novel. Which to me captures the 'sense of wonder' that I look for in the BEST science fiction, perhaps better than any other novel I have read.

In that first Rama book, a mysterious object enters our Solar System and we figure out before too long that it is artificial! And naturally, we send out some astronauts to meet it.

Well, not too long ago, a very weird object DID enter our Solar System, and there are some SERIOUS astronomers who have suggested that it might have been an unnatural object, namely, artificial. That object was called Oumuamua, and it seemed to be leaving our solar system faster than any natural object would have. The scientific community is STILL discussing it.
 

CtC

Mar 2019
11,726
4,173
California
Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke are my two favorite authors from what most people think of as 'the Golden Age' of science fiction, from the 1950's through the 1980's.

I think Clarke was at his best, not in the 2001: A Space Odyssey novel and its sequels, but in the Rama series, which begins with Rendezvous with Rama. And I am amazed to this day that no one has ever tried to make a GREAT science fiction film out of that novel. Which to me captures the 'sense of wonder' that I look for in the BEST science fiction, perhaps better than any other novel I have read.

In that first Rama book, a mysterious object enters our Solar System and we figure out before too long that it is artificial! And naturally, we send out some astronauts to meet it.

Well, not too long ago, a very weird object DID enter our Solar System, and there are some SERIOUS astronomers who have suggested that it might have been an unnatural object, namely, artificial. That object was called Oumuamua, and it seemed to be leaving our solar system faster than any natural object would have. The scientific community is STILL discussing it.
I liked "The City and the Stars". Rewrite of his first novel.
 

Blues63

Moderator
Dec 2014
14,652
12,424
Mustafa
Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke are my two favorite authors from what most people think of as 'the Golden Age' of science fiction, from the 1950's through the 1980's.

I think Clarke was at his best, not in the 2001: A Space Odyssey novel and its sequels, but in the Rama series, which begins with Rendezvous with Rama. And I am amazed to this day that no one has ever tried to make a GREAT science fiction film out of that novel. Which to me captures the 'sense of wonder' that I look for in the BEST science fiction, perhaps better than any other novel I have read.

In that first Rama book, a mysterious object enters our Solar System and we figure out before too long that it is artificial! And naturally, we send out some astronauts to meet it.

Well, not too long ago, a very weird object DID enter our Solar System, and there are some SERIOUS astronomers who have suggested that it might have been an unnatural object, namely, artificial. That object was called Oumuamua, and it seemed to be leaving our solar system faster than any natural object would have. The scientific community is STILL discussing it.

I loved Rendevouz With Rama and it is one of my favourite books, and I agree that it would make a compelling film. The Sentinal and Songs Of A Distant Earth are also very good reads. I will look up this Oumuamua as it sounds fascinating.
 
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