Trump Attempts To Slam People Who Call For Boycotts

May 2019
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Following calls for a Home Depot boycott over their co-founder's pro-Trump remarks, Donald Trump slammed the practice of calling for boycotts.
Social media was quick to ask if this wasn't the same Donald Trump who, from his White House bully pulpit, has publicly called for boycotts against:

Apple Computers
Harley Davidson
Mexico (where Trump Suits are manufactured)
The NFL
Macy's
Scotland
CNN
HBO
Rolling Stone
Amazon
Nike
Nordstrom................etc., etc.

Donald Trump Hates Boycotts Now, Despite Boycotting Things Often
 
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In theory, boycotts would seem to be a an effective form of protest, but in practice, I can't think of a single one that has resulted in producing it's desired effect. So, that's how I feel about boycotts in general.

As for Trump, he's just being the whiny baby that he always is and always has been. Same old shit -- different day.
 
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highway234

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Cultural boycott[edit]
In the 1960s, the Anti-Apartheid Movements began to campaign for cultural boycotts of apartheid South Africa. Artists were requested not to present or let their works be hosted in South Africa. In 1963, 45 British writers put their signatures to an affirmation approving of the boycott, and, in 1964, American actor Marlon Brando called for a similar affirmation for films. In 1965, the Writers' Guild of Great Britain called for a proscription on the sending of films to South Africa. Over sixty American artists signed a statement against apartheid and against professional links with the state. The presentation of some South African plays in the United Kingdom and the United States was also vetoed.[by whom?] After the arrival of television in South Africa in 1975, the British Actors Union, Equity, boycotted the service, and no British programme concerning its associates could be sold to South Africa. Similarly, when home video grew popular in the 1980s, the Australian arm of CBS/Fox Video (now 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment) placed stickers on their VHS and Betamax cassettes which labeled exporting such cassettes to South Africa as "an infringement of copyright".[143] Sporting and cultural boycotts did not have the same impact as economic sanctions,[citation needed] but they did much to lift consciousness amongst normal South Africans of the global condemnation of apartheid.
from wikipedia, that arbiter of truth.

Boycotts do indeed work. They work a hell of a lot better than mashing a blue or a red button every four years.
 

Macduff

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from wikipedia, that arbiter of truth.

Boycotts do indeed work. They work a hell of a lot better than mashing a blue or a red button every four years.
Direct boycotts work. As in a corporation does something that people don't like so they stop buying their products. Indirect boycotts don't work very well. That's when someone tries to boycott a company for advertising on a show they don't like. The threat of an indirect boycott sometimes gets a corporation to act. But most of the time, the boycott itself is just twelve weirdos on Twitter complaining.
 
May 2019
2,693
6,811
Backatown, USA
Direct boycotts work. As in a corporation does something that people don't like so they stop buying their products. Indirect boycotts don't work very well. That's when someone tries to boycott a company for advertising on a show they don't like. The threat of an indirect boycott sometimes gets a corporation to act. But most of the time, the boycott itself is just twelve weirdos on Twitter complaining.

So when Donald Trump tweets that people should boycott AT&T because they own CNN, which occasionally airs some things that offend him - is he just a weirdo on Twitter? When he urges people to boycott Nordstrom's because they stopped selling his daughter's shoes - direct or indirect?


Trump’s Latest Angry Rant Gets Spectacularly Undermined By His Own Tweets | HuffPost