Trump scores 60 percent approval in rural areas

Mar 2012
58,649
40,156
New Hampshire

President Trump
’s job approval rating in rural areas of the Rust Belt and Great Plains states is at 60 percent, markedly higher than his job approval rating nationally, according to a new poll commissioned by Democrats

A Change Research survey sponsored by The American Federation of Teachers and One Country, a group with close ties to former Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), found that 60 percent of voters from non-metro counties in Colorado, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and West Virginia approve of the job Trump is doing.

While Trump’s job approval rating among rural Democrats is only at 7 percent, he gets 97 percent support from rural Republicans and 51 percent support from rural independents.

Trump’s favorable rating in rural areas is at 55 percent favorable and 40 percent unfavorable in the nine states polled.

Among the states covered by the poll, Trump is most popular in North Dakota and Pennsylvania, hitting the 60 percent favorable mark in both states. He scores his lowest marks in Michigan and Wisconsin, where his favorability rating is at 51 percent.

A plurality of rural voters, 39 percent, said the trade war with China is hurting small towns in the short term but that it’s necessary to restore balance to global trade in the long run. Thirty-six percent said a trade war is harmful in the short term and long term and that Trump should end the trade war with China immediately, while 14 percent said the trade war is not hurting the economy.

Gun rights and illegal immigration are the most important issues to men in rural areas, while women listed health care and illegal immigration as their top concerns.

Trump wins 60 percent approval in rural areas of key states
 
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May 2019
1,555
3,888
Backatown, USA
Republicans have always done better than Democrats in rural areas.
But this is the 21st century, and the number of people who can be called rural voters is a decreasing percentage of the overall electorate.
 
Mar 2019
3,427
2,066
In Sunday School with Hognoxious
It's started to become the war of big city vs rural.

Big city wants big govt, more regulation, less gun freedoms, anti-God.

Rural wants to be free, preserve the 2nd amendment and like more traditional beliefs and worldviews based on Christianity.
 

Singularity

Moderator
Oct 2009
33,549
28,234
Kansas
Yeah the rural-urban divide is nothing new, if anything Trump needs to be at 70+ percent approval in purple state rural areas to have a solid shot at re-election given his atrocious numbers in cities and not-great numbers in suburbs. And nobody is going to challenge him in Kansas or North Dakota, ALTHOUGH a poor performance in Kansas could mean that the Senate seat is up for grabs. Not likely, but it's possible and the GOP will have to spend resources defending it.
 
May 2016
4,144
1,089
california
If only places like NYC could grow their own food. Maybe if they had a hunger strike till the Midwest comes around to their way thinking.
 
May 2019
3,875
4,425
A Van Down by the River...
Yeah the rural-urban divide is nothing new, if anything Trump needs to be at 70+ percent approval in purple state rural areas to have a solid shot at re-election given his atrocious numbers in cities and not-great numbers in suburbs. And nobody is going to challenge him in Kansas or North Dakota, ALTHOUGH a poor performance in Kansas could mean that the Senate seat is up for grabs. Not likely, but it's possible and the GOP will have to spend resources defending it.
I'm going to agree with this post to make it legit so I can state my real intent to compliment your tagline.
Very funny.
 

Singularity

Moderator
Oct 2009
33,549
28,234
Kansas
It's started to become the war of big city vs rural.

Big city wants big govt, more regulation, less gun freedoms, anti-God.

Rural wants to be free, preserve the 2nd amendment and like more traditional beliefs and worldviews based on Christianity.
The fact of the matter is, urban and suburban voters have been fairly patient with rural voters. In a democracy, majority decides the election. Yet a system has been set up via the Electoral College and the Senate to ensure that rural America has an overwhelmingly powerful per-capita voice, compared to what cities prefer. And this is right.

Yet if rural voters continue to risk the patience of urban and suburban voters by demanding ever-greater federal farm subsides and bailouts, a total ban on federal firearms regulations, and active destruction of environmental regulations of agriculture ... and these are the real issues, nobody really cares about where and how people worship ... then they will eventually find some of their power taken away. It's inevitable. Rural power depends on the active consent of urbanized America.

And let's not pretend that "rural" automatically means conservative. Vermont is as rural as you get. New Mexico is pretty rural. Colorado is fairly rural. All three of these states are firmly in alignment with progressives in the cities at least on certain issues. There used to be a huge urban-rural divide in Colorado but the demographics have changed and now only certain types of rural voters are fully aligned with the GOP there, and not enough to keep the state from going reliably Democratic.
 
Mar 2012
58,649
40,156
New Hampshire
Yeah the rural-urban divide is nothing new, if anything Trump needs to be at 70+ percent approval in purple state rural areas to have a solid shot at re-election given his atrocious numbers in cities and not-great numbers in suburbs. And nobody is going to challenge him in Kansas or North Dakota, ALTHOUGH a poor performance in Kansas could mean that the Senate seat is up for grabs. Not likely, but it's possible and the GOP will have to spend resources defending it.
Its very true even here in blue New England. Worcester County in Massachusetts was once a solid blue stronghold. Its a mix of blue collar workers and rural areas. Today its moving very red.

Central Mass. upholds reputation as increasingly red
Slowly but surely, Worcester County has gone Republican - The Boston Globe
 
Mar 2019
3,427
2,066
In Sunday School with Hognoxious
The fact of the matter is, urban and suburban voters have been fairly patient with rural voters. In a democracy, majority decides the election. Yet a system has been set up via the Electoral College and the Senate to ensure that rural America has an overwhelmingly powerful per-capita voice, compared to what cities prefer. And this is right.

Yet if rural voters continue to risk the patience of urban and suburban voters by demanding ever-greater federal farm subsides and bailouts, a total ban on federal firearms regulations, and active destruction of environmental regulations of agriculture ... and these are the real issues, nobody really cares about where and how people worship ... then they will eventually find some of their power taken away. It's inevitable. Rural power depends on the active consent of urbanized America.

And let's not pretend that "rural" automatically means conservative. Vermont is as rural as you get. New Mexico is pretty rural. Colorado is fairly rural. All three of these states are firmly in alignment with progressives in the cities at least on certain issues. There used to be a huge urban-rural divide in Colorado but the demographics have changed and now only certain types of rural voters are fully aligned with the GOP there, and not enough to keep the state from going reliably Democratic.
Rural Democrat areas are the cause of Woodstock hippy vote in Vermont. And the Hispanic and Native American vote in rural places out west.
 
Mar 2012
58,649
40,156
New Hampshire
The fact of the matter is, urban and suburban voters have been fairly patient with rural voters. In a democracy, majority decides the election. Yet a system has been set up via the Electoral College and the Senate to ensure that rural America has an overwhelmingly powerful per-capita voice, compared to what cities prefer. And this is right.

Yet if rural voters continue to risk the patience of urban and suburban voters by demanding ever-greater federal farm subsides and bailouts, a total ban on federal firearms regulations, and active destruction of environmental regulations of agriculture ... and these are the real issues, nobody really cares about where and how people worship ... then they will eventually find some of their power taken away. It's inevitable. Rural power depends on the active consent of urbanized America.

And let's not pretend that "rural" automatically means conservative. Vermont is as rural as you get. New Mexico is pretty rural. Colorado is fairly rural. All three of these states are firmly in alignment with progressives in the cities at least on certain issues. There used to be a huge urban-rural divide in Colorado but the demographics have changed and now only certain types of rural voters are fully aligned with the GOP there, and not enough to keep the state from going reliably Democratic.
Vermont is changing now though. All the NYC hippies from the 60s (think Bernie) are now growing old and the young ones that stay are conservative. Most people under 50 that get an education leave Vermont. They have a harder time attracting youth so things are going a bit more conservative up there. They now have a GOP governor and far more libertarian and republican seats in their legislature and mayors. Thats a changing state in the next decade or so.