Two-thirds of Americans support ending forced union dues

Feb 2011
17,277
6,251
Boise, ID
Given we could be hearing the Supreme Court's decision on Janus v. AFSCME as early as today, if not next week, and given that if Janus prevails we're likely to hear bleating about the "radical right wing" Supreme Court justices, I figured it is worth pointing out that even a majority of union households, and almost two-thirds of Americans polled, all are in favor of ending these union security clauses that cause fees to be mandatory on employees.

Exclusive: Poll Shows Nearly Two-Thirds of Americans Would Support Supreme Court Striking Down Mandatory Union Dues in Janus Case; Majority of Union Households Agree



Nearly two-thirds of Americans — even a majority of those in labor households — believe workers should be able to choose whether or not they pay union dues, according to a new poll released just days before the Supreme Court is expected to make a major ruling on the issue in the case Janus v. AFSCME.
 
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United States
Hell, only about 10% of US workers even belong to a labor union. I doubt that the other 57% who stand in opposition have much to worry about when it comes to union dues. ;)
 
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Rasselas

Moderator
Feb 2010
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Given we could be hearing the Supreme Court's decision on Janus v. AFSCME as early as today, if not next week, and given that if Janus prevails we're likely to hear bleating about the "radical right wing" Supreme Court justices, I figured it is worth pointing out that even a majority of union households, and almost two-thirds of Americans polled, all are in favor of ending these union security clauses that cause fees to be mandatory on employees.

Exclusive: Poll Shows Nearly Two-Thirds of Americans Would Support Supreme Court Striking Down Mandatory Union Dues in Janus Case; Majority of Union Households Agree

There's so much wrong with this poll, it's hard to know where to begin. First, we don't have the actually questions in the poll, including the questions leading up to asking this one. It could be a push poll, we don't know.

Also, as presented the poll doesn't distinguish between individual workers and groups of workers. It just says "workers should be able to choose." Of course workers should be able to choose--but whether than means individual workers in a union shop or a democratic election of workers in aggregate is not clear. If you asked me such a question, of course I would say that workers should get to choose--but I'd mean that they should get to choose in an election over whether to unionize or which union to choose, and I'd assume you meant workers as a whole, not individually.
 
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Sep 2013
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Hell, only about 10% of US workers even belong to a labor union. I doubt that the other 57% who stand in opposition have much to worry about when it comes to union dues. ;)
What are you saying, that this is a nothing burger?
 
Feb 2011
17,277
6,251
Boise, ID
There's so much wrong with this poll, it's hard to know where to begin. First, we don't have the actually questions in the poll, including the questions leading up to asking this one. It could be a push poll, we don't know.

Also, as presented the poll doesn't distinguish between individual workers and groups of workers. It just says "workers should be able to choose." Of course workers should be able to choose--but whether than means individual workers in a union shop or a democratic election of workers in aggregate is not clear. If you asked me such a question, of course I would say that workers should get to choose--but I'd mean that they should get to choose in an election over whether to unionize or which union to choose, and I'd assume you meant workers as a whole, not individually.
I think the question asked was:

"Currently government workers in many states, including teachers, must pay dues to a labor union as a requirement of their employment whether they choose to participate in the union or not. However, the Supreme Court will soon decide if these employees may stop paying dues.

Do you believe that government workers should be required to pay union dues to represent them or should be [sic] allowed to stop paying union dues if they choose?"


That language seems fairly clear to me, that they're asking if individuals should be able to choose to stop paying union dues without it affecting their ability to remain employed.
 
Feb 2011
17,277
6,251
Boise, ID
Hell, only about 10% of US workers even belong to a labor union. I doubt that the other 57% who stand in opposition
You're implying that all union households are in favor of mandatory union dues and that only non-union households oppose mandatory dues. This poll showed a majority of union households themselves opposing the mandatory nature of government worker union dues.
 

Rasselas

Moderator
Feb 2010
74,626
53,566
USA
I think the question asked was:

"Currently government workers in many states, including teachers, must pay dues to a labor union as a requirement of their employment whether they choose to participate in the union or not. However, the Supreme Court will soon decide if these employees may stop paying dues.

Do you believe that government workers should be required to pay union dues to represent them or should be [sic] allowed to stop paying union dues if they choose?"


That language seems fairly clear to me, that they're asking if individuals should be able to choose to stop paying union dues without it affecting their ability to remain employed.
They could have been much more clear. It could have been asked in any entirely different way and would have elicited an entirely different answer. For example

Currently government workers in many states, including teachers, must pay dues to a labor union they have democratically accepted. They have to pay fees whether they wish to or not, but the union is required by law to represent them in any case. Should they have to pay fees to the union or should they be allowed to stop paying if they choose?

I'd also like to know what other questions were asked, and in which order.