U.S. Is “Most Dangerous” Place in Developed World to Give Birth

Feb 2011
17,492
12,005
The formerly great golden state
#1
U.S. Is “Most Dangerous” Place in Developed World to Give Birth

The U.S. is the “most dangerous place to give birth in the developed world,” according to a USA Today investigation.

Every year in the U.S., more than 50,000 mothers are severely injured during or after childbirth and 700 die.
California presents a notable exception. According to the USA Today investigation, hospitals and safety advocates there have instituted practices that have cut the state’s maternal death rate in half.
If you can't afford to leave the country to have a baby, come to California.
 
Likes: 2 people

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
75,239
43,953
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#3
It is sad and shameful. We're spending more per capita on health-care than any other nation and still receiving substandard medical care.
That is because the money we are spending is to make health insurance company owners wealthy, and not on the actual health care.
 
Likes: 12 people

RNG

Moderator
Jan 2015
13,972
9,781
Left coast
#4
That is because the money we are spending is to make health insurance company owners wealthy, and not on the actual health care.
Two of my friends got transferred to the US by their employers, one for 5 years the other for 7. Both of them (independently) came back calling them HMO pimps.
 
Likes: 4 people
Dec 2014
16,247
5,723
The Milky Way
#5
Has little to do with money, more like lack of simple initiative. From the USA Today article:

At dozens of hospitals in New York, Pennsylvania and the Carolinas – where USA TODAY obtained records through federally funded quality programs – fewer than half of maternity patients were promptly treated for dangerous blood pressure that put them at risk of stroke. At some of those hospitals, less than 15 percent of mothers in peril got recommended treatments, the records show.

The difference it costs to properly treat versus the costs for not properly treating is huge. Inertia at work.


Further:

The American Hospital Association, the influential trade association representing nearly 5,000 hospitals and health networks, has in recent years held closed-door training sessions aimed at getting maternity hospitals to improve care.

In a series of webinars, AHA first warned anyone not invited to disconnect.

Then, trainers for the association went on to bluntly discuss how wide-ranging care failures at birthing hospitals are causing needless deaths and injuries.

...

“What we know about those deaths is that most of them were absolutely preventable,” a trainer for the association told maternity staffs during a 2015 webinar. “They were from causes that we could have done something about. We could have prevented it if we had recognized the emergency early on.”
 
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RNG

Moderator
Jan 2015
13,972
9,781
Left coast
#6
Has little to do with money, more like lack of simple initiative. From the USA Today article:

At dozens of hospitals in New York, Pennsylvania and the Carolinas – where USA TODAY obtained records through federally funded quality programs – fewer than half of maternity patients were promptly treated for dangerous blood pressure that put them at risk of stroke. At some of those hospitals, less than 15 percent of mothers in peril got recommended treatments, the records show.

The difference it costs to properly treat versus the costs for not properly treating is huge. Inertia at work.


Further:

The American Hospital Association, the influential trade association representing nearly 5,000 hospitals and health networks, has in recent years held closed-door training sessions aimed at getting maternity hospitals to improve care.

In a series of webinars, AHA first warned anyone not invited to disconnect.

Then, trainers for the association went on to bluntly discuss how wide-ranging care failures at birthing hospitals are causing needless deaths and injuries.

...

“What we know about those deaths is that most of them were absolutely preventable,” a trainer for the association told maternity staffs during a 2015 webinar. “They were from causes that we could have done something about. We could have prevented it if we had recognized the emergency early on.”
Sounds to me that you're admitting that "costs to properly treat versus the costs for not properly treating is huge" so the reason is simple greed.
 
Feb 2011
17,492
12,005
The formerly great golden state
#7
Sounds to me that you're admitting that "costs to properly treat versus the costs for not properly treating is huge" so the reason is simple greed.
Proper treatment cuts into the insurance industry's bottom line. They need those profits to purchase more politicians and keep the profits flowing.
 
Likes: 3 people

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,870
17,091
USA
#8
Sounds to me that you're admitting that "costs to properly treat versus the costs for not properly treating is huge" so the reason is simple greed.
The part that turns me off from the article...there is absolutely NO excuse for a patient to bleed to death while under your watch. Bleeding is a easy one to monitor. As far as blood pressure issues, it really depends on the overall health of the Mother prior to becoming pregnant. If she is 300 pounds or more...it is going to be a problem and BP issues can develop overnight. Since most of the cases in the article are Medicaid patients, it can be a difficult and lengthy process to get them into the system the first time and they have to wait before they seek care. You also have many physicians who are not accepting Medicaid anymore because it is more hassle than what is paid, so that delay's treatment. You also have the element of ignorance. Many women are six months pregnant before they even realize it, due to variety of reasons and this is a problem as well. It would be better to examine the individual cases to determine fault...most of the time it is a combination of human failure.
 
Likes: 3 people
Mar 2012
56,351
37,911
New Hampshire
#9
The part that turns me off from the article...there is absolutely NO excuse for a patient to bleed to death while under your watch. Bleeding is a easy one to monitor. As far as blood pressure issues, it really depends on the overall health of the Mother prior to becoming pregnant. If she is 300 pounds or more...it is going to be a problem and BP issues can develop overnight. Since most of the cases in the article are Medicaid patients, it can be a difficult and lengthy process to get them into the system the first time and they have to wait before they seek care. You also have many physicians who are not accepting Medicaid anymore because it is more hassle than what is paid, so that delay's treatment. You also have the element of ignorance. Many women are six months pregnant before they even realize it, due to variety of reasons and this is a problem as well. It would be better to examine the individual cases to determine fault...most of the time it is a combination of human failure.
I would have to think Americans obesity issues have a lot to do with our medical outcomes. One of my friends father just recently died from a blood clot after an elbow surgery. Simple procedure but he was almost 325 pounds. Very sedate and they think the clot came from that.
 
Likes: 1 person
Jun 2018
2,151
426
Ford, Washington
#10
I think location has a lot to do with the quality of care. Good doctors want to live in an area they like. You know what you call the person that graduates last in his class in medical school? "Doctor".