U.S. Is “Most Dangerous” Place in Developed World to Give Birth

Mar 2012
56,188
37,757
New Hampshire
#11
I think location has a lot to do with the quality of care. Good doctors want to live in an area they like. You know what you call the person that graduates last in his class in medical school? "Doctor".
There is some truth to that and to the fact that we are a massive sized country. If you live in the middle of nowhere and get very sick or have a very complicated birth, its not easy to get care. It could be in another state. I read where the US has the most air ambulance travel than anywhere else in the world due to our being so scattered all over. That makes it very difficult. You are probably less likely to get early care if you live 250 miles from an obstetrician or specialist.
 
Feb 2011
17,468
11,959
The formerly great golden state
#12
I would have to think Americans obesity issues have a lot to do with our medical outcomes. One of my friends father just recently died from a blood clot after an elbow surgery. Simple procedure but he was almost 325 pounds. Very sedate and they think the clot came from that.
It looks like people in California are just as fat as they are anywhere else in the country. Maybe there are more factors at play.
 
Mar 2012
56,188
37,757
New Hampshire
#13
It looks like people in California are just as fat as they are anywhere else in the country. Maybe there are more factors at play.
Well being a big state is always helpful. I imagine they have all sorts of specialists and trauma centers. You get to some parts of the country and the nearest trauma center is 4 states away. I know here you get airlifted down to Boston. Access is critical for any healthcare to work. US sucks at access.
 
Likes: 1 person
Dec 2015
16,697
12,057
SoCal
#14
There is some truth to that and to the fact that we are a massive sized country. If you live in the middle of nowhere and get very sick or have a very complicated birth, its not easy to get care. It could be in another state. I read where the US has the most air ambulance travel than anywhere else in the world due to our being so scattered all over. That makes it very difficult. You are probably less likely to get early care if you live 250 miles from an obstetrician or specialist.
I just wonder what medical students who don't finish last in the class get called.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,838
17,050
USA
#15
Well being a big state is always helpful. I imagine they have all sorts of specialists and trauma centers. You get to some parts of the country and the nearest trauma center is 4 states away. I know here you get airlifted down to Boston. Access is critical for any healthcare to work. US sucks at access.
My 90 year old Dad drives one hour to see a specialist. In Kentucky, where we are from, it can be anywhere from a 1 hour to 2.5 hours if you have to see a specialist in Lexington.
 
Likes: 1 person

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,838
17,050
USA
#16
I think location has a lot to do with the quality of care. Good doctors want to live in an area they like. You know what you call the person that graduates last in his class in medical school? "Doctor".
I have worked with thousands of Doctors over the years and I would much rather work or be seen by a Doctor who graduates on the bottom tier in the US than a Doctor from Pakistan, where we import a fair amount. I hate to stereotype them, but my perception is based on experience. They are the dirtiest Doctors I have ever worked with...never wash their hands between patients and leave needles/sharps/bloody material in the beds of patients. It is like universal precautions and OSHA is unheard of in Pakistan and they could care less about the caregivers and providers that come after them to see a patient. I bitch the entire shift when I am teamed up with them. LOL
 
Feb 2011
17,468
11,959
The formerly great golden state
#17
Well being a big state is always helpful. I imagine they have all sorts of specialists and trauma centers. You get to some parts of the country and the nearest trauma center is 4 states away. I know here you get airlifted down to Boston. Access is critical for any healthcare to work. US sucks at access.
I'm sure access is a big factor.
Being a big state is a double edged sword, though. You can travel a thousand miles, and still be inside the State of California. If you live in a big city, then there are more likely to be specialists. If you live in Tulelake (small town in extreme north eastern California), you may have to travel a bit.

Living in a rural vs. an urban area could be a factor as well, but that would apply all over the world.
 
Mar 2012
56,188
37,757
New Hampshire
#18
I'm sure access is a big factor.
Being a big state is a double edged sword, though. You can travel a thousand miles, and still be inside the State of California. If you live in a big city, then there are more likely to be specialists. If you live in Tulelake (small town in extreme north eastern California), you may have to travel a bit.

Living in a rural vs. an urban area could be a factor as well, but that would apply all over the world.
Not really, a two hour drive in France and I could be in another country. Here we could still be in the same state. We are vastly more spread out. Canada is similar but even they concentrate on the lower quadrants.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,838
17,050
USA
#19
It looks like people in California are just as fat as they are anywhere else in the country. Maybe there are more factors at play.
California has less obesity than other States because people are more active due to nice weather. This is a generalized study based on numbers, it really isn't a valid study you can sink your teeth into without reviewing individual cases for probable cause. It is a huge deal when a hospital loses a patient that is at low risk...heads will roll, especially in the case of a bleed out. The overall health and condition of the Mother is a large part of morbidity with any patient.
 
Mar 2012
56,188
37,757
New Hampshire
#20
California has less obesity than other States because people are more active due to nice weather. This is a generalized study based on numbers, it really isn't a valid study you can sink your teeth into without reviewing individual cases for probable cause. It is a huge deal when a hospital loses a patient that is at low risk...heads will roll, especially in the case of a bleed out. The overall health and condition of the Mother is a large part of morbidity with any patient.
I also wonder if more women have midwives or babies at home? I know more natural type states like Vermont and Colorado want to do the natural thing and they dont go to doctors at all. They have doolahs and midwives.