U.S. Is “Most Dangerous” Place in Developed World to Give Birth

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
26,344
15,153
USA
#21
I would have to think Americans obesity issues have a lot to do with our medical outcomes. One of my friends father just recently died from a blood clot after an elbow surgery. Simple procedure but he was almost 325 pounds. Very sedate and they think the clot came from that.
It is easy to throw a clot when you are morbidly obese. Circulation is compromised when you are that big. We have a lot of weight loss surgery patients at our hospital and many of them have complicated recoveries after the surgery. It is a simple procedure, but the first 24 hours after, is pins and needles as far as monitoring for some of them, especially the patients who are over 400 pounds.
 
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Jun 2014
59,999
34,323
Cleveland, Ohio
#22
The part that turns me off from the article...there is absolutely NO excuse for a patient to bleed to death while under your watch. Bleeding is a easy one to monitor. As far as blood pressure issues, it really depends on the overall health of the Mother prior to becoming pregnant. If she is 300 pounds or more...it is going to be a problem and BP issues can develop overnight. Since most of the cases in the article are Medicaid patients, it can be a difficult and lengthy process to get them into the system the first time and they have to wait before they seek care. You also have many physicians who are not accepting Medicaid anymore because it is more hassle than what is paid, so that delay's treatment. You also have the element of ignorance. Many women are six months pregnant before they even realize it, due to variety of reasons and this is a problem as well. It would be better to examine the individual cases to determine fault...most of the time it is a combination of human failure.
What are these women dying from? Apart from bleeding out, I mean.

Strokes? Seizures?
 
Feb 2011
15,405
9,884
The formerly great golden state
#23
I also wonder if more women have midwives or babies at home? I know more natural type states like Vermont and Colorado want to do the natural thing and they dont go to doctors at all. They have doolahs and midwives.
That could be yet another factor. Having a baby in a hospital costs thousands of dollars now, even if there are no complications. If the patient does not have medical insurance that pays well, then the midwife might be their only, or at least their most affordable, option.
 
Mar 2012
52,896
35,011
New Hampshire
#24
That could be yet another factor. Having a baby in a hospital costs thousands of dollars now, even if there are no complications. If the patient does not have medical insurance that pays well, then the midwife might be their only, or at least their most affordable, option.
Its also cultural, many Natives, eastern Asians and such dont trust western medicine and prefer not to use hospitals. If they have complications and are rushed to an ER, that puts the doctors in trouble since they dont know the health history and if the worst happens they get the blame. I know too the opioid addicts dont want anyone to know they are pregnant and then they show up 7 months pregnant and in trouble.
 
Jun 2014
59,999
34,323
Cleveland, Ohio
#25
I think location has a lot to do with the quality of care. Good doctors want to live in an area they like. You know what you call the person that graduates last in his class in medical school? "Doctor".
There certainly are doctor shortages, as well as free health clinics for women. Be interesting to see how these deaths are distributed across the country.
 
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HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
26,344
15,153
USA
#27
Its also cultural, many Natives, eastern Asians and such dont trust western medicine and prefer not to use hospitals. If they have complications and are rushed to an ER, that puts the doctors in trouble since they dont know the health history and if the worst happens they get the blame. I know too the opioid addicts dont want anyone to know they are pregnant and then they show up 7 months pregnant and in trouble.
I remember a patient who was 500 pounds and showed up at the ER with cramping. She thought she was constipated. When the physician was examining her, she was crowning and they rushed her to OB. She did not know she was pregnant. The opioid addicts are the worst currently and we see a fair amount of pregnant women, far along in their pregnancies. We transfer them immediately to a high risk pregnancy hospital. They are fearful they will not get the drugs they need and will get dope sick. These poor babies are addicted the minute they are born and it is awful.
 
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Jun 2014
44,770
44,171
United States
#28
I remember a patient who was 500 pounds and showed up at the ER with cramping. She thought she was constipated. When the physician was examining her, she was crowning and they rushed her to OB. She did not know she was pregnant. The opioid addicts are the worst currently and we see a fair amount of pregnant women, far along in their pregnancies. We transfer them immediately to a high risk pregnancy hospital. They are fearful they will not get the drugs they need and will get dope sick. These poor babies are addicted the minute they are born and it is awful.

The US is hardly the only nation on the planet dealing with opioid addiction, and yet, we are the most dangerous developed nation on the planet for surviving childbirth.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
26,344
15,153
USA
#29
The US is hardly the only nation on the planet dealing with opioid addiction, and yet, we are the most dangerous developed nation on the planet for surviving childbirth.
I think the article is only sharing the numbers, there are causal factors that maybe other developed Nations are not experiencing. Working heavily on the patient side of healthcare, it is a combination of human failure...access to healthcare being number one...whether facilities are not available or the Mother does not seek access/care. In 20 years, I have not witnessed the death of a Mother delivering a child and I have always worked for the "poor kids on the block" facilities. As far as opioid addiction, we are definitely seeing a uptick from 20 years ago. It used to be few and rehab beds were always open for them..today, there is a waiting list months long and the ER's are flooded with overdoses.
 
Likes: 2 people
Jun 2014
44,770
44,171
United States
#30
I think the article is only sharing the numbers, there are causal factors that maybe other developed Nations are not experiencing. Working heavily on the patient side of healthcare, it is a combination of human failure...access to healthcare being number one...whether facilities are not available or the Mother does not seek access/care. In 20 years, I have not witnessed the death of a Mother delivering a child and I have always worked for the "poor kids on the block" facilities. As far as opioid addiction, we are definitely seeing a uptick from 20 years ago. It used to be few and rehab beds were always open for them..today, there is a waiting list months long and the ER's are flooded with overdoses.

We've also experienced an unprecedented up-tick in suicides. Perhaps it's a quality of life issue?