Umpires to boycott Serena Williams matches

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
39,627
25,789
Toronto
#1
As fallout continues from Saturday’s heated U.S. Open final that saw Naomi Osaka defeat Serena Williams in a match marred by conflict and controversy, tennis umpires are having their say.

They’re not pleased with Williams or what they see as a lack of support from the tennis world for chair umpire Carlos Ramos, who was on the receiving end of a heated outburst from the 23-time Grand Slam champion.

Report: Umpires considering boycott

The Times of London reports that there is a growing consensus that umpires feel they were “not supported by the USTA” on several occasions and cite one anonymous source claiming that umpires are considering boycotting matches played by Williams.

The source tells The Times that some umpires believe that Ramos was “thrown to the wolves for simply doing his job and was not willing to be abused for it” and that they are considering “to refuse any match assignments involving Williams until she apologizes for vilifying Ramos and calling him a ‘liar’ and a ‘thief.'”

Williams was assessed three code violations during the the loss to Osaka. Ramos warned her against receiving coaching early in the second set, which Williams protested.

Williams accused Ramos of sexism, called him a thief

A frustrated Williams later smashed her racket and accused Ramos of sexism for assessing penalties that she believes he would not have given to a man. Williams called Ramos a thief and demanded an apology. The third code violation resulted in a game penalty for Williams.

Williams explained her anger in the post-match media conference.

“He never took a game from a man because he said ‘thief,'” Williams said. “For me it blows my mind, but I’m going to continue to fight for women. The fact that I have to go through this is just an example for the next person.”

Williams was later fined $17,000 for her outburst.

Retired umpire: Officials feel ‘abandoned by the WTA’

A former umpire echoed the concerns of The Times’ source with ESPN Tuesday. Richard Ings, a retired elite Gold Badge umpire described as having close ties with active umpires told ESPN that officials feel like the WTA doesn’t have their back.

“The umpiring fraternity is thoroughly disturbed at being abandoned by the WTA,” Ings told ESPN. “They are all fearful that they could be the next Ramos. They feel that no one has their back when they have to make unpopular calls.”

ITA supported Ramos

Ramos did receive the backing of the International Tennis Federation, which released a statement Monday in his support.

“Carlos Ramos is one of the most experienced and respected umpires in tennis,” the statement reads. “Mr. Ramos’ decisions were in accordance with the relevant rules and were re-affirmed by the U.S. Open’s decision to fine Serena Williams for the three offenses.”

Ramos speaks

Ramos spoke publicly Tuesday for the first time since the match in an interview with Tribuna Expresso in his native Portugal.

“I’m fine, given the circumstances,” Ramos said. “It’s a delicate situation, but a la carte arbitration does not exist. Do not worry about me.”
Reports: Umpires consider boycott of Serena Williams matches, fearful of being 'the next Ramos'

What a mess...
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
39,627
25,789
Toronto
#6
@syrenn

Naomi Osaka, 20 years old, just became the first player from Japan to win a Grand Slam.

Yet rather than cheer Osaka, the crowd, the commentators and US Open officials all expressed shock and grief that Serena Williams lost.

Osaka spent what should have been her victory lap in tears. It had been her childhood dream to make it to the US Open and possibly play against Williams, her idol, in the final.

It’s hard to recall a more unsportsmanlike event.

Here was a young girl who pulled off one of the greatest upsets ever, who fought for every point she earned, ashamed.

At the awards ceremony, Osaka covered her face with her black visor and cried. The crowd booed her. Katrina Adams, chairman and president of the USTA, opened the awards ceremony by denigrating the winner and lionizing Williams — whose ego, if anything, needs piercing.

“Perhaps it’s not the finish we were looking for today,” Adams said, “but Serena, you are a champion of all champions.” Addressing the crowd, Adams added, “This mama is a role model and respected by all.”

That’s not likely the case now, not after the world watched as Serena Williams had a series of epic meltdowns on the court, all sparked when the umpire warned her: No coaching from the side. Her coach was making visible hand signals.

“I don’t cheat to win,” Williams told him. “I’d rather lose.”

She couldn’t let it go, going back multiple times to berate the umpire. At one point she called him a thief.

“You stole a point from me!” she yelled.

After her loss, Williams’s coach admitted to ESPN that he had, in fact, been coaching from the stands, a code violation. The warning was fair.
More: https://nypost.com/2018/09/08/its-shameful-what-us-open-did-to-naomi-osaka/

Yep. Typical American fans... Sorry, just the truth.
 
Likes: BarKnuckles

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
39,627
25,789
Toronto
#8
men have been behaving badly on court for years. They are famous for breaking their rackets and cussing out the officials.....and nothing happens.
Yes, someone brought up John McEnroe in the other thread... But, again, as I said back there, he played back in the 70s and 80s. Different time, different era. Things were acceptable back then that are no longer now. That may have more to do with it than gender, don't you think?
 
Feb 2015
15,009
7,334
sadness
#9
Yes, someone brought up John McEnroe in the other thread... But, again, as I said back there, he played back in the 70s and 80s. Different time, different era. Things were acceptable back then that are no longer now. That may have more to do with it than gender, don't you think?
i was not part of the other threads.

in my opinion this is all about sexism.
 
Nov 2010
22,481
14,058
#10
And this goes with the nonsense about her catsuit at the French Open. And probably didn't help that Serena mocked them by wearing a tutu as here outfit, which I absolutely loved by the way.

Then the reaction about Serena losing it, when men act like mad men, they aren't told they are losing it or had a meltdown
 

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