Unusual weapons from Russia

Sep 2011
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aMEEErica
#12
Next we'll go over advanced bear encounter tactics and a very extreme weapon that will make it so you need not fear any animal of any kind, WHAM!

(even the two-legged variety...)

This is one of my own! :p

Thx :)
 
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Nov 2007
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Prague, Czech Republic
#13
Gorillas...

Why does a gorilla beat it's chest?

They actually do, you know...

Think about it, no other animal besides man can do that... huh?

No other animal can pat it's own belly, it distinguishes the highest order animals from all the rest below, it is a modest demonstration of superiority and a warning to lesser forms, remember that, it might come in handy some day...
Pretty much any primate can pat its own belly. So can a lot of rodents. And kangaroos. And sloths. Most frogs; some lizards.

I don't think your average animal in the jungle is thinking in terms of Victorian era classifications of 'higher' and 'lower' animals. Gorillas beat their chests because it makes a loud noise and calls attention to how big and muscly they are.
 
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#14
Pretty much any primate can pat its own belly. So can a lot of rodents. And kangaroos. And sloths. Most frogs; some lizards.

I don't think your average animal in the jungle is thinking in terms of Victorian era classifications of 'higher' and 'lower' animals. Gorillas beat their chests because it makes a loud noise and calls attention to how big and muscly they are.
Yes, it is a display, so, since they don't do it from an analytical side, do they do it for no reason?

Does it have any effect, or just make them feel better?

Do the other animals that can pat their belly do it to display aggression? (or at all?)

They do that, and often bluff charge.

They do that when they are nervous and agitated, other animals react accordingly.

Now I'm not saying I can read an animal's mind, nor can you, but I do see animals stop and decide I suppose that this is not their prey...

Again, I can't read their mind, but they will stop, stand there confused for a moment and move on... the same thing happens when a chimp for instance shakes a stick, uses a tool, you will see a cheetah stop, asses the sitch and move on, this from a stick waving adolescent chimp the animal would have surely attacked otherwise.

(And you can often disarm a mean dog by patting the right side of your body to mimic a tail.)

And I have done this many times, now does the dog analyze what side of the body is being pat, can they tell their right from their left, or are they merely acting upon some instinct?

Try that some time, pat your leg on the right side and disarm a dog, then pat on the left side and see how the response changes instantly to alarm.

And you can go back and forth like this, right side calm, left side alarm, right side again, back to calm, left side again, changes instantly to alarm, they react like a puppet on a string.

But I'm curious here as well, what lizard pats their belly in a display, do you have a link to that?

Thx :)
 
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Sep 2011
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aMEEErica
#15
Back to bears, and this is all I have on this.

Everyone knows you don't run from a bear, this is because it sets of their predator instincts to pursue... if there was any doubt on the bears part, it has just been removed.

And you can't outrun a bear anyway, they are much faster than a man, 35 mph.

Now everyone probably knows "you don't get between a momma bear and her cubs" and this is absolutely true, but another situation you want to avoid that seems to happen much more frequently is surprising a bear, and one with maybe no easy and obvious escape route...

But when encountering one, stop, freeze, and don't make noise either, it can scare a bear off, most will avoid people, but not all, better to remain undetected.

But if you do encounter a bear and it sees you and is curious, lol... you want to back away slowly, and if near a hill you want to work your way up the hill, not down.

Slowly back away up the hill and work your way off to the side, (try to avoid direct eye contact too.) what we are doing is making it more trouble than it is worth to the bear...

Bears have to expend a lot more energy to get up that hill than you do, I've done this several times back on a friend's mining property.

Some people say that if it's inevitable, you want to play dead... but I have heard of encounters with mixed results there, I wouldn't want to count on that.

A woman years ago fended off a large brown bear that had all but tore her husband's scalp off who was trying to play dead, famous case, she did it by rapping the bear across the muzzle with her binoculars, so I myself would rather fight or even bluff charge the bear than lay down and play dead.

A good friend of mine had a camp set up and a local bear that used to bluff charge him every single day, my friend even went and got a .457 Magnum, kept it on him all the time, but never had to use it.

Thx :)
 
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Sep 2011
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#16
I guess it's been 18 years now, February of 2001 when I encountered a bunch of teenage kids who came to an abandoned house I was squatting in...

10 teenage guys with baseball bats and axe handles...

That old house had been abandoned for 30 years, it was trashed many times over and kind of isolated too, that's what made it kind of scary...

I am hiding in the garage, keeping still, trying to remain undetected, but at the same time my mind and body are racing... (what they call in martial arts, the "chi.")

(people can do amazing stuff with that, btw.)

Well, they all charged into the house, hoping to surprise someone I imagine, beating the walls and yelling, I took that opportunity to leave, as quickly, but as quietly as possible, I didn't even take the time to put my boots on, just skipped across the leaf-covered yard and away I went.

So they never got me, I came back the next day and saw my stuff was undisturbed, they never knew I was there.

But anyway, I have wondered since that time what I could have done if they did discover me, what weapon could I use to fend off this bunch?

Now of course there is a gun, and I am against guns for the most part, but I will admit I could have used one that night.

But what other weapon could I use, what could I use that can be made from things readily available...?

I came to the conclusion that the short, stout spear would be ideal against a baseball bat, even from multiple attackers.

So, you find a thick sapling, about 4 Inches thick, cut to length at about 4 and a half feet, and make one end very pointy and sharp.

Leave a couple branches on the side of it though, these are going to serve as handles...

You are going to use this to thrust, to get around their baseball bat and thrust into their torso or face, one uses this like a battering ram.

They can't really knock it out of the way, and someone with a baseball bat must first rear back for the swing, thus telegraphing their intent, (and leaving them open) not the case with the stout spear, one is best just staying the heck away from it.

Now... this stout spear is pretty devastating, I would not be so worried about any north American predatory animal really if I have one, bears included.

Thx :)
 
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Likes: The Man
Nov 2007
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#17
Yes, it is a display, so, since they don't do it from an analytical side, do they do it for no reason?
No, like I said - they do it because it makes a loud noise and emphasises how big and muscly they are - it's a threat display.

Try that some time, pat your leg on the right side and disarm a dog, then pat on the left side and see how the response changes instantly to alarm.

And you can go back and forth like this, right side calm, left side alarm, right side again, back to calm, left side again, changes instantly to alarm, they react like a puppet on a string.
Neither action provoked any reaction in my dog.

But I'm curious here as well, what lizard pats their belly in a display, do you have a link to that?
I don't know of any that do it as a display. I was just questioning your claim that only humans and gorillas can pat their bellies.
 
Sep 2011
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aMEEErica
#18
No, like I said - they do it because it makes a loud noise and emphasises how big and muscly they are - it's a threat display.



Neither action provoked any reaction in my dog.



I don't know of any that do it as a display. I was just questioning your claim that only humans and gorillas can pat their bellies.
I first saw that in a video they had of an experiment, they take a dog and fixture it so it has to look ahead at a white screen.

Then they took just a cardboard cutout of a dog's silhouette, backlit and wag a cardboard tail on either side and observe the reactions...


Thx :)
 
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#19
No, like I said - they do it because it makes a loud noise and emphasises how big and muscly they are - it's a threat display.



Neither action provoked any reaction in my dog.



I don't know of any that do it as a display. I was just questioning your claim that only humans and gorillas can pat their bellies.
Well, I probably misspoke saying that only higher order animals CAN do that, I should have said "would" or "will" do that, sorry.

Thx :)
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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Toronto
#20
PP-2000 sub-machine gun: PP-2000 - Wikipedia



Adopted by many police forces in Russia



Also apparently carried, for instance, by special units employed by the Foreign Affairs Ministry, to provide security for high ranking diplomats abroad