Unvaccinated Oregon Boy Contracts Tetanus, Spends Two Months In Hospital For Over $800K In Medical Treatments

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
49,652
35,799
Pennsylvania, USA
#1
An unvaccinated 6-year-old Oregon boy was hospitalized for two months after he contracted tetanus following an injury on a farm. His family racked up hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical treatment to save his life.

The report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said this was the first pediatric tetanus case in the state in almost 30 years.

According to the report, in 2017 the child sustained an injury to his forehead while playing outside. Following the accident, the laceration was "cleaned and sutured at home."

Six days later, the child experienced muscle spasms, jaw clenching and difficulty breathing. At that time, his parents called for emergency services and the child was airlifted to a local medical center. Despite receiving treatment, the child, on his fifth day in the hospital, required a tracheal tube and, as he experienced spasms in his diaphragm and larynx, had to be placed on a ventilator.
...

Doctors gave the child a diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) during the course of his eight-weeks of treatment, which the CDC estimated to cost more than $800,000. However, the estimate did not include the cost of air transportation, inpatient rehabilitation and the use of an ambulance, the report said.
Source - Newsweek

I suppose we have to qualify this as good news. Acute tetanus can be serious stuff, and I'm glad we live in a time when there's an easy, safe, and affordable way to circumvent the risk. It's a shame that the family chose to spend over $1,000,000 on treatment-related expenses rather than a < $50 than a tetanus shot - assuming you have no insurance, and you don't participate in any of the state or federal programs specifically designed to provide affordable vaccinations.
 
Jun 2014
59,999
34,325
Cleveland, Ohio
#2
I asked this question elsewhere.

If a person lies about having been vaccinated and exposes another person to a preventible disease, and they die from it, has that liar committed manslaughter (reckless or negligent homicide)?
 
Mar 2012
52,896
35,012
New Hampshire
#3
I asked this question elsewhere.

If a person lies about having been vaccinated and exposes another person to a preventible disease, and they die from it, has that liar committed manslaughter (reckless or negligent homicide)?
Interesting question, I have no idea. I suspect since our courts recognize religious freedom, one could say its against their religion or something and what could be done? I know with some blood borne diseases it can be homicide but thats because they willing DID something to the other person to cause the infection. Would certainly be interesting. The other question is what about some older people who were born before the vaccinations or were told they had the disease? We know an 80 year old woman who was told she had the measles when she was a kid but contacted it recently. She required hospitalization and got very sick. She survived but was lucky. Now she doesnt know if she had the childhood diseases or not as her mom had told her.
 
Likes: Madeline
Jun 2014
59,999
34,325
Cleveland, Ohio
#4
Interesting question, I have no idea. I suspect since our courts recognize religious freedom, one could say its against their religion or something and what could be done? I know with some blood borne diseases it can be homicide but thats because they willing DID something to the other person to cause the infection. Would certainly be interesting. The other question is what about some older people who were born before the vaccinations or were told they had the disease? We know an 80 year old woman who was told she had the measles when she was a kid but contacted it recently. She required hospitalization and got very sick. She survived but was lucky. Now she doesnt know if she had the childhood diseases or not as her mom had told her.
Your doctor can test your blood for continuing immunity.

All of us boomers probably need booster shots, at a minimum.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
72,361
40,481
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#5
I suspect since our courts recognize religious freedom, one could say its against their religion or something and what could be done?
"Religious freedom" does not excuse every action. Belief is absolutely protected; conduct is not. One may arguably have the religious freedom to refuse vaccination (though I would argue against that as well), but not to put other people in danger by lying about it. I doubt that it would rise to the level of manslaughter, however, except maybe in a particular case in which one knows he is exposing a particular person who cannot be vaccinated, or something like that.
 
Mar 2012
52,896
35,012
New Hampshire
#6
"Religious freedom" does not excuse every action. Belief is absolutely protected; conduct is not. One may arguably have the religious freedom to refuse vaccination (though I would argue against that as well), but not to put other people in danger by lying about it. I doubt that it would rise to the level of manslaughter, however, except maybe in a particular case in which one knows he is exposing a particular person who cannot be vaccinated, or something like that.
I have seen quite a few states are now taking away religious exemptions for vaccinations so I would assume at some point somebody is heading to the SC over it. Also, its predominantly public schools require the vaccinations but homeschooling and some private schools dont. So I am not sure legally how it could rise to manslaughter either, as we dont have mandatory society vaccinations outside of public school. But it is an interesting topic.
 
Likes: Madeline
Jun 2014
59,999
34,325
Cleveland, Ohio
#7
"Religious freedom" does not excuse every action. Belief is absolutely protected; conduct is not. One may arguably have the religious freedom to refuse vaccination (though I would argue against that as well), but not to put other people in danger by lying about it. I doubt that it would rise to the level of manslaughter, however, except maybe in a particular case in which one knows he is exposing a particular person who cannot be vaccinated, or something like that.
This is all the rage among some asshole new grandparents, told they can't see the baby unless they get vaccinated or baby has been, at about 6 months.

They are trading instructions on Facebook as to how to forge vaccination paperwork.

Dozens of babies have fallen ill. It's a matter of time before one dies.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
72,361
40,481
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#8
I have seen quite a few states are now taking away religious exemptions for vaccinations so I would assume at some point somebody is heading to the SC over it.
And I approve of removing religious exemptions. I do not believe, however, that the Supreme Court will rule that there is any religious freedom to refuse vaccination, it being a public health issue. Under Employment Division v. Smith, the law requiring vaccinations (except for those medically unable to tolerate them) would be generally applicable and would not be targeting religious belief or practice for discrimination.
So I am not sure legally how it could rise to manslaughter either, as we dont have mandatory society vaccinations outside of public school.
The issue, though, is not the mere refusal to be vaccinated, but also in lying about it, which could put someone at an avoidable risk.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
26,353
15,169
USA
#9
Source - Newsweek

I suppose we have to qualify this as good news. Acute tetanus can be serious stuff, and I'm glad we live in a time when there's an easy, safe, and affordable way to circumvent the risk. It's a shame that the family chose to spend over $1,000,000 on treatment-related expenses rather than a < $50 than a tetanus shot - assuming you have no insurance, and you don't participate in any of the state or federal programs specifically designed to provide affordable vaccinations.
A person really does not have to participate in a State or Federal program to receive vaccines. The health department provides them for free or a very low cost. I send my students to the health department all the time for vaccines in order to participate in their clinical's. I doubt very seriously this family will pay that hospital tab. They will either apply for charity and the bill is written off or they will declare bankruptcy. The taxpayer will either absorb the cost when the hospital applies for a federal grant or the healthcare consumer will pay for it by paying inflated healthcare costs to cover the loss. This is a prime example of what happens due to the impact of the anti-vaxxer idiots.
 

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
49,652
35,799
Pennsylvania, USA
#10
I'm embarrassed to admit that I didn't get the flu vaccine this year. Nothing to do with anti-vax beliefs though; it's just been sheer laziness on my part. If they offered the flu shots at my office, I'd take it in a heartbeat.
 

Similar Discussions