US Marshals arresting people for non-payment of student loans

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
56,128
44,242
Ohio
Scary stuff.

Here’s what the U.S. government saysabout the student loan you may have been tardy about paying back: “If your loan is placed with a collection agency, you will be responsible for costs incurred to get payment. The holder of your loan can take other actions to collect as well.” Those “other actions” involve withholding your tax refund or, in some cases, garnishing your wages. And, this week in Texas, they began to involve federal agents in combat gear bursting into debtors’ houses and arresting them.
Texas congressman Gene Green explained to Fox 26 that the federal government has been contracting out student-loan collections to private debt collectors, who are allowed to deploy the U.S. marshals as their enforcement arm. “There’s bound to be a better way to collect on a student loan debt,” said the congressman. Around Houston, that “better way” involves 1,200 to 1,500 arrest warrants.


In 2003, U.S. marshals were arresting people in the Twin Cities who had not paid their student loans as part of the so-called “Operation Anaconda Squeeze.” But as with any case in the U.S., where debtors’ prisons have been outlawed since 1833, those arrests came from contempt-of-court warrants issued after summonses had been ignored; that does not appear to have happened here. Particularly since the financial crisis of the 2000s, debt imprisonment has grown, and a judge can issue a contempt warrant if he or she feels that a debtor is “willfully” not paying a loan.
I don't think anyone should be imprisoned for being poor, but here we are.

U.S. Marshals Are Arresting People in Texas Who Have Outstanding Student Loans
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
27,717
20,607
Weirdo
I don't disagree with your comment. I did see in the article that these warrants were due to ignored court summons.

At first this sounded like a bench warrant but it may not be that. It appears to be a forced signing of a payment agreement and I'm assuming those arrested are then set free.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
56,128
44,242
Ohio
I don't disagree with your comment. I did see in the article that these warrants were due to ignored court summons.

At first this sounded like a bench warrant but it may not be that. It appears to be a forced signing of a payment agreement and I'm assuming those arrested are then set free.
Subject to re-arrest, I would also assume. Probably right there in the agreement. Miss a payment, off you go. You arrest someone for non-compliance of a loan agreement and in order to get out of jail you then have to agree to their terms, which no doubt include going to jail if you don't. Then it's legal for them to imprison you for non-payment, because you signed the agreement. Kind of like of probation or parole, except there's no underlying criminal conviction that prompted you to be arrested in the first place.

At least that's how I interpreted it. I think it's sketchy.
 

Singularity

Moderator
Oct 2009
33,984
28,893
Kansas
The U.S. Department of Education is a for-profit bank, it has been for decades, it is only the Trump administration's bad reputation and general excesses that have made this fact plain. It should be a top priority for the next president to reform the system from the top down and cancel the debt of those in need. Any candidate who is unwilling to commit to this does not deserve the Democratic nomination.
 
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Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
56,128
44,242
Ohio
The U.S. Department of Education is a for-profit bank, it has been for decades, it is only the Trump administration's bad reputation and general excesses that have made this fact plain. It should be a top priority for the next president to reform the system from the top down and cancel the debt of those in need. Any candidate who is unwilling to commit to this does not deserve the Democratic nomination.
Agreed. I don't believe debt forgiveness is a solution since it does nothing to stop the racket that cause the debt.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
27,717
20,607
Weirdo
Subject to re-arrest, I would also assume. Probably right there in the agreement. Miss a payment, off you go. You arrest someone for non-compliance of a loan agreement and in order to get out of jail you then have to agree to their terms, which no doubt include going to jail if you don't. Then it's legal for them to imprison you for non-payment, because you signed the agreement. Kind of like of probation or parole, except there's no underlying criminal conviction that prompted you to be arrested in the first place.

At least that's how I interpreted it. I think it's sketchy.
I'm not seeing anything about that. That would be the debtors prison you were speaking about in the OP.

From what I did read it doesn't appear people were even booked into the jail, they just had to sign a payment agreement in front of a judge.

The man in the video said himself that they didn't book him, just detained him for 1hr while his case was being prepared.

I don't agree with this practice, however I don't see this as a debtors prison.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
56,128
44,242
Ohio
I'm not seeing anything about that. That would be the debtors prison you were speaking about in the OP.

From what I did read it doesn't appear people were even booked into the jail, they just had to sign a payment agreement in front of a judge.

The man in the video said himself that they didn't book him, just detained him for 1hr while his case was being prepared.

I don't agree with this practice, however I don't see this as a debtors prison.
So what would have happened if he refused to sign the agreement?
 
Mar 2019
3,285
1,687
"US" of A
Holy moly! Sounds like debtors prison.
That's because it is, the aristocracy no longer requires the labor force it once did to extract and concentrate societal and natural world wealth. The extra bodies will need to be "managed" as the empire continues in decline and the environemnt slides into further hominid sodomization..