US needs 2 million healthcare workers

Mar 2012
55,494
36,981
New Hampshire
#1
The US will need to hire 2.3 million new health care workers by 2025 in order to adequately take care of its aging population, a new report finds.
But a persistent shortage of skilled workers -- from nurses to physicians to lab technicians -- will mean hundreds of thousands of positions will remain unfilled, according to research by global health care staffing consultancy Mercer.

"Few other industries are racing the clock to find a future-ready workforce like today's health care administrators," said Jason Narlock, senior consultant with Mercer.

Not only are experienced nurses retiring at a rapid clip, but there aren't enough new graduates to replenish the workforce. Hospitals and other medical facilities are getting so desperate to recruit and retain nurses they're offering pricey perks and incentives, including five figure signing bonuses. Physicians and surgeons are already stretched thin. But by 2025, there will be nearly 103,000 new openings for these positions and a shortage of 11,000 skilled professionals for these roles.

The US can't keep up with demand for health care workers
 
Likes: 2 people
Jan 2016
51,730
47,973
Colorado
#2
The US will need to hire 2.3 million new health care workers by 2025 in order to adequately take care of its aging population, a new report finds.
But a persistent shortage of skilled workers -- from nurses to physicians to lab technicians -- will mean hundreds of thousands of positions will remain unfilled, according to research by global health care staffing consultancy Mercer.

"Few other industries are racing the clock to find a future-ready workforce like today's health care administrators," said Jason Narlock, senior consultant with Mercer.

Not only are experienced nurses retiring at a rapid clip, but there aren't enough new graduates to replenish the workforce. Hospitals and other medical facilities are getting so desperate to recruit and retain nurses they're offering pricey perks and incentives, including five figure signing bonuses. Physicians and surgeons are already stretched thin. But by 2025, there will be nearly 103,000 new openings for these positions and a shortage of 11,000 skilled professionals for these roles.

The US can't keep up with demand for health care workers
One important cause of the nursing shortage is that nurses are paid substantially more than nursing instructors----which of course gives those instructors a very strong incentive to just up and quit their jobs, and become nurses! DUH! So the shortage of nursing instructors is a root cause of this mess.

Here is an article from The Atlantic which looks at the problem from many angles:

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/02/nursing-shortage/459741/
 
Likes: 2 people
Mar 2012
55,494
36,981
New Hampshire
#3
One important cause of the nursing shortage is that nurses are paid substantially more than nursing instructors----which of course gives those instructors a very strong incentive to just up and quit their jobs, and become nurses! DUH! So the shortage of nursing instructors is a root cause of this mess.

Here is an article from The Atlantic which looks at the problem from many angles:

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/02/nursing-shortage/459741/
Another issue is few want to be out in rural areas. Most of them are deep in debt and get great job offers in suburbs or cities or at big research facilities. So the rural areas have to start offering great salaries and bonuses to lure them away and still it isnt always working. Canada offered to pay off their loans in exchange for working in understaffed areas. We might have to as well.
 
Likes: 3 people

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,519
16,637
USA
#4
The US will need to hire 2.3 million new health care workers by 2025 in order to adequately take care of its aging population, a new report finds.
But a persistent shortage of skilled workers -- from nurses to physicians to lab technicians -- will mean hundreds of thousands of positions will remain unfilled, according to research by global health care staffing consultancy Mercer.

"Few other industries are racing the clock to find a future-ready workforce like today's health care administrators," said Jason Narlock, senior consultant with Mercer.

Not only are experienced nurses retiring at a rapid clip, but there aren't enough new graduates to replenish the workforce. Hospitals and other medical facilities are getting so desperate to recruit and retain nurses they're offering pricey perks and incentives, including five figure signing bonuses. Physicians and surgeons are already stretched thin. But by 2025, there will be nearly 103,000 new openings for these positions and a shortage of 11,000 skilled professionals for these roles.

The US can't keep up with demand for health care workers
I was just talking about this in the faculty lounge. We were able to stabilize the nursing shortage by offering more training programs, including the for-profits. Now, many of the for-profits are closed and community college programs have waiting lists of over 2 years...at least around here. Where are we going to train them? Remember when ITT Tech closed abruptly...those students are still on the waiting list at the community college. At this point, their core credits will not transfer and they have to start over. Plus the community colleges pre-req them to death...and in reality a 2 year degree turns into 4. Does a future nurse really need "bohemian basket weaving" to graduate? LOL
 
Likes: 2 people
Jan 2016
51,730
47,973
Colorado
#6
Another issue is few want to be out in rural areas. Most of them are deep in debt and get great job offers in suburbs or cities or at big research facilities. So the rural areas have to start offering great salaries and bonuses to lure them away and still it isnt always working. Canada offered to pay off their loans in exchange for working in understaffed areas. We might have to as well.
It is precisely the same issues with finding people willing to be TEACHERS in rural areas. I think our rural areas are dying, to be brutally frank. In the next few decades, we will be fully automating many of our farms, especially the cultivation of our grain crops such as corn and wheat that are grown in orderly rows. The rural areas have been depopulating. I think that trend will continue and perhaps intensify and accelerate. The only good jobs to be found will be in the urban areas, UNLESS you're the kind of person who has figured out how to make a living online, and prefer an isolated rural life.
 
Mar 2012
55,494
36,981
New Hampshire
#7
I was just talking about this in the faculty lounge. We were able to stabilize the nursing shortage by offering more training programs, including the for-profits. Now, many of the for-profits are closed and community college programs have waiting lists of over 2 years...at least around here. Where are we going to train them? Remember when ITT Tech closed abruptly...those students are still on the waiting list at the community college. At this point, their core credits will not transfer and they have to start over. Plus the community colleges pre-req them to death...and in reality a 2 year degree turns into 4. Does a future nurse really need "bohemian basket weaving" to graduate? LOL
We have the same thing here. One of my daughters friends already has a bachelors degree but decided literature wasnt her thing so she wants to be a nurse now. She was told it could be years to get in a program. She already is 27 and is eager. We have lots of will we just need to find a way.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,519
16,637
USA
#8
One important cause of the nursing shortage is that nurses are paid substantially more than nursing instructors----which of course gives those instructors a very strong incentive to just up and quit their jobs, and become nurses! DUH! So the shortage of nursing instructors is a root cause of this mess.

Here is an article from The Atlantic which looks at the problem from many angles:

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/02/nursing-shortage/459741/
Anyone knows that you will never become wealthy in education...and nursing instructors are paid less in academics than on the unit. But, keep in mind, teaching nursing is much easier than actually doing the job. Much easier. The other problem, most State nursing boards require that nurses have a MSN. There are not a lot of nurses with Master's degrees.
 
Mar 2012
55,494
36,981
New Hampshire
#9
We need a national HC system paid for by taxes like every other developed country on earth.
I agree but it doesnt address the shortage. We still would have a terrible shortage. Japan has national healthcare and they have a shortage too.
 
Mar 2012
55,494
36,981
New Hampshire
#10
It is precisely the same issues with finding people willing to be TEACHERS in rural areas. I think our rural areas are dying, to be brutally frank. In the next few decades, we will be fully automating many of our farms, especially the cultivation of our grain crops such as corn and wheat that are grown in orderly rows. The rural areas have been depopulating. I think that trend will continue and perhaps intensify and accelerate. The only good jobs to be found will be in the urban areas, UNLESS you're the kind of person who has figured out how to make a living online, and prefer an isolated rural life.
Agree about the farming, but here in New England, the youth are moving out to the boonies. They no longer can afford to live in the cities and as they near 30 they dont want to live with 5 others. So they are moving out in the sticks. They would be more than willing to work out here rather than commute.