USN's autonomous F18 carrier landings

Tedminator

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US Navy Simulated Unmanned Landing Tests Employ UCAS-D Technology | UAS VISION


August 4, 2011 by The Editor

A U.S. Navy F/A-18D surrogate aircraft emulated an autonomous, unmanned aircraft as it performed several approaches to arrested landings on the deck of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 2 July. The carrier landing test included the use of new Precision GPS and Tactical Targeting Network Technology (TTNT), which is being developed for the Navy’s Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) Programme. The Precision GPS and TTNT, intended to provide guidance and control, is being developed by an industry team working with the Navy. The full test spanned 10 days of flights, between June 27 and July 6, and employed the F/A-18 and a King Air surrogate aircraft. During that time, the test logged more than 42 flight hours in the F/A-18 and King Air surrogates, as well as 64 successful approaches using two different approach profiles with the UCAS-D system.

Eighteen professionals from ARINC Inc. in Annapolis, Md., are working on the UCAS-D aviation/ship integration effort, serving as team leads, engineers, configuration managers, risk managers, and subject matter experts. Their role is to help ensure Navy requirements are properly developed, documented, understood, and implemented. “It was truly great to see the UCAS-D approaches and landings. They came in straight, as if they were on rails, with minimal if any perceived deviations from their glideslope or course,” says ARINC Staff Principal Engineer Marty Paulaitis, who worked the LSO platform. “The other LSOs who were watching just turned to me and said ‘Wow!’”
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eeexcellent.. only a matter of time till our marchine overlords take over.
 
eeexcellent.. only a matter of time till our marchine overlords take over.
Still pretty cool though, now with that pesky space shuttle out of the way, our attention will again focus on the fundamentals of innovation.

Score one for the military industrial complex.

When it happens, I wanna be like that quarter robot quarter man half tin man with a big heart character on Terminator Salvation and hook up with a chick that's a cross between Moon Bloodgood and Tia Carrere, that way my time in post apocalyptic America will be more tolerable.
 
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Devil505

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I don't think it'll matter one bit whether or not they like this, after all, if a GPS can replace a map or a car can replace a buggy, then so too can a drone replace a naval aviator.

Especially if can land and take off of aircraft carriers, which is cool given all the factors that it takes to do so proficiently.
You may be right but in the short term anyway, the Navy...... being top-heavy with aviator/carrier brass..... will resist replacing conventional aircraft with unmanned technology, imo.
 
You may be right but in the short term anyway, the Navy...... being top-heavy with aviator/carrier brass..... will resist replacing conventional aircraft with unmanned technology, imo.
Well, the brass in the Air Force are almost all pilots, we now have UCAV's armed with Tow missiles, they have had to learn to adapt, so too will the Navy aviator brass, if not, then I imagine the Navy will get rid of them too.

It's like anything else, everyone's all happy and giddy about new technology, all up until that new technology catches up and replaces them.
 
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Jun 2011
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I don't think it'll matter one bit whether or not they like this, after all, if a GPS can replace a map or a car can replace a buggy, then so too can a drone replace a naval aviator.

Especially if can land and take off of aircraft carriers, which is cool given all the factors that it takes to do so proficiently.
As long as they can secure the communications from being jammed by the enemy, it makes too much sense not to do, right now the planes still need to accommodate it's weakest link, the human body. Other than that aside from the macho top gun stuff, taking people out of harm's way seems like a smart idea to me.
 

Tedminator

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Still pretty cool though, now with that pesky space shuttle out of the way, our attention will again focus on the fundamentals of innovation. Score one for the military industrial complex.

When it happens, I wanna be like that quarter robot quarter man half tin man with a big heart character on Terminator Salvation and hook up with a chick that's a cross between Moon Bloodgood and Tia Carrere, that way my time in post apocalyptic America will be more tolerable.
Working on it. The autonomous SMSS is being sent to A'stan for field trials..


U.S. Army Selects Lockheed Martin's SMSS Autonomous Vehicle for Afghanistan Deployment | Lockheed Martin
July 28th, 2011

The U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force, through the Robotics Technology Consortium, selected the Lockheed Martin [NYSE:LMT] Squad Mission Support System (SMSS) to deploy to Afghanistan for a first-of-its-kind military assessment. SMSS will deploy as the winner of the Project Workhorse Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) competition sponsored by the Army. The largest autonomous vehicle ever to be deployed with infantry, the 11-foot-long SMSS can carry more than half-a-ton of a squad’s equipment on rugged terrain, easing the individual soldier’s burden, which can often exceed 100 pounds.

“SMSS is the result of more than a decade of robotic technology development, and we welcome the opportunity to demonstrate this capability in theater, where it can have an immediate impact at the squad level,” said Scott Greene, vice president of ground vehicles in Lockheed Martin’s Missiles and Fire Control business.

“The Army has tested the system’s capabilities in three domestic user assessments, and SMSS has been deemed ready to deploy.” As part of the three-month Military Utility Assessment (MUA), four vehicles and a field service representative will support light infantry in theater as the service evaluates how autonomous vehicles can support or ease the equipment burden for deployed troops. A fifth vehicle and an engineering team will remain in the U.S. for analysis and additional support. The Army plans to begin the Afghanistan assessment late this year, after a period of evaluations and training. “An in-theater assessment is the next logical step in the process of informing the requirements for the Army’s future squad-sized UGV developments,” Greene said.

A fully-loaded SMSS is internally transportable on board CH-47 and CH-53 helicopters, providing new logistics capability to light and early-entry forces. The SMSS Block I variant, which will be deployed, has a range of 125 miles and features three control options: supervised autonomy, tele-operation or manually driven. The SMSS sensor suite allows it to lock on and follow any person by recognizing their digital 3-D profile (captured by the onboard sensors), and it can also navigate terrain on its own following a trail of GPS waypoints.
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[video=youtube;75lKJN-D4xs]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75lKJN-D4xs&feature=youtu.be[/video]
 

Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
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South Florida
As long as they can secure the communications from being jammed by the enemy, it makes too much sense not to do, right now the planes still need to accommodate it's weakest link, the human body. Other than that aside from the macho top gun stuff, taking people out of harm's way seems like a smart idea to me.
Right. Up until we have a war between two sides with fully armed autonomous robots... God have mercy on the civilians caught in that crossfire.
Imagine a future where politicians no longer have to worry about the civilians at home complaining about sending their children to die in wars.




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Anyhoo, the Silent Service is also looking for a few good robots...

Navy asks industry to develop large unmanned submarine able to operate independently for more than two months
August 3, 2011 - Military and Aerospace Electronics



ARLINGTON, Va., 3 Aug. 2011. The U.S. Navy is asking industry to develop a large unmanned submarine able to operate in the open ocean and in coastal waters and harbors on missions lasting more than 70 days to gather intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) information. The U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) released a broad agency announcement (ONRBAA11-025) last week for the Large Displacement Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Innovative Naval Prototype Technology (LDUUV INP) program to develop UUV autonomy and long-endurance propulsion systems for large unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). Full proposals are due no later than 12 Sept. 2011.

The LDUUV is to be a pier-launched and recovered large unmanned submersible able to operate in the open ocean and conduct over-the-horizon sensor missions in coastal waters and harbors. The two primary technology areas that Navy researchers want to develop and demonstrate involve machine autonomy and endurance.
Autonomy involves autonomy software, computer hardware, and sensors. Endurance, meanwhile, pertains to UUV propulsion technology that can operate independently for tens of hours to months. Each effort to develop autonomy technologies and endurance technologies will have two phases.
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