USN's autonomous F18 carrier landings

Tedminator

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Jun 2010
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I'll bet the naval aviators don't like this at all.
Well, the brass in the Air Force are almost all pilots, we now have UCAV's armed with Tow missiles, they have had to learn to adapt, so too will the Navy aviator brass, if not, then I imagine the Navy will get rid of them too.

It's like anything else, everyone's all happy and giddy about new technology, all up until that new technology catches up and replaces them.
they better start getting used to the future. history is progressing forward with or without them..


An X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration aircraft flies high over Edwards. The program wrapped up its mission here in May 2012 after more than two years of successful flight testing. first flight was Feb. 4, 2011 (Air Force photo by Bobbi Zapka)



The U.S. Navy's X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator flies over Edwards during a routine test mission. The UCAS-D program conducted the airworthiness test phase for the X-47B at Edwards, which came to a successful conclusion May 15 after more than two years of testing. Team Edwards will continue to support the program, as the 412th Maintenance Group will send personnel to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., to continue supporting in the aircraft carrier suitability test phase. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Chris Neill)
 

Tedminator

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Jun 2010
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some background info on the X-47B development so far..


X-47B Drone Gets Upgrade | Flashpoints
The U.S. Navy has quietly added a capability to its future carrier-launched unmanned warplane that has the potential to tilt the Pacific balance of power. On November 2, the Navy announced it would add equipment and software for aerial refueling to one of its two in-development X-47B armed drones built by Northrop Grumman. The change could extend, by thousands of miles, the useful striking range of the Navy’s nuclear-powered aircraft carriers, starting in around seven years’ time. That could put them beyond the effective range of the fast attack vessels, diesel-powered submarines and anti-ship ballistic missiles that China is developing in order to create a defensive perimeter around the Western Pacific.


A typical sortie by a Navy F/A-18 Hornet fighter travels no more than 450 miles and lasts just a few hours. The Navy and Air Force use flying tankers to extend the range of their warplanes. But even with aerial refueling, traditional manned aircraft are limited by the endurance of their human pilots.The approximately 450-mile striking range of today’s carrier air wings could force the Navy to sail into China's main defensive zone in order to launch strikes on Chinese targets, thereby placing the carriers at risk. But an unpiloted aircraft could fly as long as its equipment functioned and its onboard supply of lubricants and other fluids held out – ranging potentially thousands of miles over several days of flight. Carriers with armed, aerially-refueled drones could strike targets anywhere in the Pacific from mid-ocean safe zones.

It’s for that reason that a small contingent of analysts and officials fought to save the $1.5 billion X-47B development effort during a time, three years ago, when it was threatened by budget cuts and opposition from the Navy’s deeply traditional senior pilots. In 2008, analysts from the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments gave the X-47 a 50-50 chance of being canceled in the next budget.

So CSBA analysts Robert Work and Tom Ehrhard produced a hard-hitting report extolling the X-47’s virtues. And in early 2009, the Barack Obama administration tapped Work to be the Navy’s new undersecretary. Work’s growing influence guaranteed the X-47’s survival, and the decision to add refueling gear ensured it would meet its maximum military potential. The Navy aims to equip its carriers with an operational, X-47-style drone warplane beginning in 2018.
..snips..


Good decision by the BHO admin making Robert Work the USN's undersecretary... his support for the X-47 project will give the USN a kickass cost effective robotic weapons platform in the near-future.
 

Tedminator

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update bump..

awesome... X-47B UCAS passing its carrier trials with flying colors :)


[video=youtube_share;WC8U5_4lo2c]http://youtu.be/WC8U5_4lo2c[/video]

"It isn't very often you get a glimpse of the future. Today, those of us aboard USS George H.W. Bush got that chance as we witnessed the X-47B make its first ever arrested landing aboard an aircraft carrier," said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. "The operational unmanned aircraft soon to be developed have the opportunity to radically change the way presence and combat power are delivered from our aircraft carriers."
 
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Mar 2010
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woot! drones for F18 are being deployed..

Raytheon and US Navy begin MALD-J Super Hornet integration
The U.S. Navy and Raytheon Company have begun integrating the Miniature Air Launched Decoy Jammer variant into the U.S. Navy's fleet of F/A-18 E/F Super Hornets. The integration process will include a series of risk reduction activities and technology demonstrations. MALD® is a state-of-the-art, low-cost flight vehicle that is modular, air-launched and programmable. It weighs less than 300 pounds and has a range of approximately 500 nautical miles (about 575 statute miles).
..more..

You know what's interesting? I had a fishfinder sonar made by the Raytheon company. It was a piece of crap compared to the ones made by other companies. I ended up pitching it.
 
May 2007
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Right. Up until we have a war between two sides with fully armed autonomous robots... God have mercy on the civilians caught in that crossfire.
Imagine a future where politicians no longer have to worry about the civilians at home complaining about sending their children to die in wars.
The scary thing to me isn't the war between robots but instead the robots that will be programmed to go in and kill any living human being within a particular geographical location.
 

Tedminator

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Jun 2010
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update bump..

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 24, 2014) The X-47B unmanned aircraft conducts its first night time deck handling and taxi tests Aug. 21 aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter/Released)

 
Mar 2010
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Indiana
Right. Up until we have a war between two sides with fully armed autonomous robots... God have mercy on the civilians caught in that crossfire.
Imagine a future where politicians no longer have to worry about the civilians at home complaining about sending their children to die in wars.



--------------------

Anyhoo, the Silent Service is also looking for a few good robots...

Navy asks industry to develop large unmanned submarine able to operate independently for more than two months
August 3, 2011 - Military and Aerospace Electronics



ARLINGTON, Va., 3 Aug. 2011. The U.S. Navy is asking industry to develop a large unmanned submarine able to operate in the open ocean and in coastal waters and harbors on missions lasting more than 70 days to gather intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) information. The U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) released a broad agency announcement (ONRBAA11-025) last week for the Large Displacement Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Innovative Naval Prototype Technology (LDUUV INP) program to develop UUV autonomy and long-endurance propulsion systems for large unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). Full proposals are due no later than 12 Sept. 2011.

The LDUUV is to be a pier-launched and recovered large unmanned submersible able to operate in the open ocean and conduct over-the-horizon sensor missions in coastal waters and harbors. The two primary technology areas that Navy researchers want to develop and demonstrate involve machine autonomy and endurance.
Autonomy involves autonomy software, computer hardware, and sensors. Endurance, meanwhile, pertains to UUV propulsion technology that can operate independently for tens of hours to months. Each effort to develop autonomy technologies and endurance technologies will have two phases.
...snipped...

I hope the real deal isn't bright yellow like that one!
 

Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
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X-47B update boomp

The X-47B successfully conducted the first ever Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR) of an unmanned aircraft April 22, completing the final test objective under the Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System demonstration program.

The Northrop Grumman X-47B is a unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) designed for carrier-based operations. Developed by Northrop Grumman, the X-47 project began as part of DARPA's J-UCAS program, and is now part of the United States Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) program. The X-47B is a tailless jet-powered flying wing capable of semi-autonomous operation and aerial refueling.

[video=youtube;0gtMzpss3QY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gtMzpss3QY[/video]

:1thumbup:
 
Jun 2013
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I'll bet the naval aviators don't like this at all.
With the increased use of drones....plus things like this....

I think the days of the "pilot" are drawing to a close.

Makes sense....no human pilots mean no POWs in a war that have to be rescued or negotiated for.

Sad....but as Eddie Rickebacker gave way to Chuck Yeager and Yeager gave way to fly-by-wire.....the human pilot may be soon giving way to a guy sitting in an office in San Diego "playing a video game"...while the bird is halfway around the world....

or even no video gamer at all.
 
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Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
27,241
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South Florida
With the increased use of drones....plus things like this....

I think the days of the "pilot" are drawing to a close.

Makes sense....no human pilots mean no POWs in a war that have to be rescued or negotiated for.
That, plus it takes a lot of weight/space to keep a squishy human pilot alive in a high performance jet. A pilotless plane can go faster and do higher G manuevers which would kill a human pilot.
 
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