Vaccinations.

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
52,799
38,766
Ohio
#41
Another reason for suspicion are when you hear about things like 911 recovery workers being told they didn't need masks or those working to clean up the Kingston coal ash spill in Tennessee being told specifically not to use protective equipment and that coal ash wouldn't hurt them. Residents in Flint, Michigan were told the water was fine.

Here's another example:

An Epidemic Is Killing Thousands Of Coal Miners. Regulators Could Have Stopped It

This is a direct outcome of allowing industries to infiltrate our govt regulatory agencies and it needs to stop.
 
Apr 2018
7,961
1,852
oregon
#45
So, it's OK if other parents at your school refuse to vaccinate their children and thus an epidemic which had otherwise died out is allowed to make a comeback?
If you and yours are vaccinated, you needn't worry. I think vaccinations are a fine idea. I don't believe in forcing them upon the unwilling, though.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
26,344
15,153
USA
#46
I may have missed it but can someone explain to me that if you have the vaccination how you can get the measles. Are the people getting the measles also unvaccinated?
Vaccines are not 100%. There is a 3% window for infection even if vaccinated. You also have a small group of people where some of the vaccines do not take. I am one of the few who cannot develop immunity for the MMR. Another problem, we are not sure how long the immunity lasts. We never had to worry about it before. So it is possible that someone our age does not have immunity from our childhood vaccines. The outbreak of measles that occurred in CA a few years back...infected a few elderly people. Now, we have a problem where we should start checking for immunity with older people such as adding titers (blood test) as part of our wellness exams, which will inflate our over all health care costs because of the willfully ignorant.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
26,344
15,153
USA
#47
If you and yours are vaccinated, you needn't worry. I think vaccinations are a fine idea. I don't believe in forcing them upon the unwilling, though.
I also don't believe in creating a public safety issue because of a few ignorant people either. If people choose not to vaccinate then they should stay away from people who would prefer to stay healthy. A case of measles for someone over 50 is dangerous.
 
Likes: Ian Jeffrey
Apr 2018
7,961
1,852
oregon
#48
I also don't believe in creating a public safety issue because of a few ignorant people either. If people choose not to vaccinate then they should stay away from people who would prefer to stay healthy. A case of measles for someone over 50 is dangerous.
We've already had this discussion and are not too far apart.
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
26,344
15,153
USA
#49
We've already had this discussion and are not too far apart.
I know...you should specify "physically forced". I hope it never gets to that point. Disease has the risk of spreading and if our outbreaks get worse, where we are placing locations in strict isolation, we may have to deport the people who refuse to vaccinate. :) j/k Seriously tho, that could happen...dangerous disease outbreaks happening frequently. This is a good example of the path to a third world country.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
61,897
50,193
CA
#50
Well good to see some kids are smarter than their parents

Ethan Lindenberger, frustrated by years of arguments about his mother’s anti-vaccination stance, staged a quiet defection on Reddit. The Norwalk, Ohio, teenager needed advice, he said, on how to inoculate himself against both infectious disease and his family’s dogma. At 18, he was old enough, Lindenberger explained. He wanted to get vaccinated. But he didn’t know how.

“Because of their beliefs I’ve never been vaccinated for anything, God knows how I’m still alive,” Lindenberger wrote days before Thanksgiving.

As anti-vaccination movements metastasize amid outbreaks of dangerous diseases, Internet-savvy teenagers are fact-checking their parents’ decisions in a digital health reawakening — and seeking their own treatments in bouts of family defiance. “This generation of unvaccinated children coming of age has looked at the science and want to protect themselves,” said Allison Winnike, president and chief executive of the Immunization Partnership, a Texas-based nonprofit vaccine advocacy group.

Anti-vaccination efforts spread after the publication of a now-debunked 1998 study linking some immunizations to autism, Winnike said.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/heal...g-get-shots-their-own/?utm_term=.50b170246ff5
 

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