Warfare Trivia

Jul 2011
75,116
41,443
Memphis, Tn.
I agree.

Like I said, I would have considered Pearl Harbor the answer.

But, as far as territorial waters, I have heard many accounts of how the U-boats would spot they prey at night against the lights of shore early in the war, before blackouts were imposed.

Also that many of the fires from the sinkings were clearly visible from land.

I would guess that most or all those 91 ships were sunk in our territorial waters.
You can be very far our to see and see a moving ship backlighted by bright lights on shore on a clear night.
Visible from shore does not mean a whole lot. I would imagine a burning oil tanker at night could be seen from quite a long distance.
 
Jul 2014
33,872
8,760
midwest
You can be very far our to see and see a moving ship backlighted by bright lights on shore on a clear night.
Visible from shore does not mean a whole lot. I would imagine a burning oil tanker at night could be seen from quite a long distance.
Territorial waters extend 12 nautical miles from land.

That would be almost 14 "regular" miles.
 

ARMCX1

Former Staff
Jun 2013
15,162
9,940
SoCal
You can be very far our to see and see a moving ship backlighted by bright lights on shore on a clear night.
Visible from shore does not mean a whole lot. I would imagine a burning oil tanker at night could be seen from quite a long distance.
At an altitude of 328 ft. above sea level on a ship, you can see a maximum 21 miles until the earth's curvature makes the horizon.

The lower the altitude brings the horizon closer.
 
Jun 2014
6,419
3,467
EU. Hang Vlad Tepes from the Kremlin.
Leyte Gulf? Or Battle of the Philippine Sea?
Philippine Sea, I'd say, June '44. Three out of five Japanese carriers sunk, and the Americans had more carriers than that with none sunk, so at least a dozen carriers going head to head.

This is one of those things I remember my dad told me, when I was a kid.

I'd guess Midway in 1942. But only because Japan did not have so many carriers after that battle.
Japan lost all their four carriers at Midway, but the Americans only had three with one sunk. Shows how bloody important intelligence gathering really is.
 
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Jul 2013
51,108
54,255
Nashville, TN
Philippine Sea, I'd say, June '44. Three out of five Japanese carriers sunk, and the Americans had more carriers than that with none sunk, so at least a dozen carriers going head to head.

This is one of those things I remember my dad told me, when I was a kid.
The Japanese Carriers were so outclassed and outnumbered, not to mention their pilots and planes were sub par by this time, that the Carrier Strike force was simply used as bait, bait that Bull Halsey went after full bore and almost cost us the invasion force except for a failure of will in the Japanese surface force that closed the trap.
 
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Jul 2013
51,108
54,255
Nashville, TN
If I remember correctly, by the end of the war the Japanese had lost every ship in their navy larger than a Destroyer and only had a couple of those left.
 

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