Was it right to drop two atomic bombs on Japan?

Jul 2011
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Memphis, Tn.
I thing my father spent the rest of his life trying to forget that the war ever happened - must been awful traumatic for him.
One of my Uncles came back so traumatized that he suffered from depression, mood swings, insomnia,what we would call PTSD today, until he finally took his own life 45 years after the end of the war.
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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Toronto
One of my Uncles came back so traumatized that he suffered from depression, mood swings, insomnia,what we would call PTSD today, until he finally took his own life 45 years after the end of the war.
that's been my family's experience with everyone who ever fought in war too.
My dad also, reportedly (according to mom and others, I wasn't born yet then, for another couple years) came home from fighting in Afghanistan with Red Army in the 80s a changed man... Different man. "Not the one I had married", as mom once said, quietly. He used to be a cheerful guy, joked a lot, listened to smuggled Western music, was basically the life of the party, fun dude to be around. When came home from Afghan, he was all silent and withdrawn and angry all the time. Never put his hands on mom, that I am aware of, or on my older sister, when she was a girl. But he sure was violent with us boys, throughout, in my own childhood too, as far as "discipline".

War can turn men into monsters...
 

Sparta

Former Staff
Aug 2006
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Connecticut
The Americans often said the Japanese lacked honor in the way they carried on the war. Beginning with the sneak attack, the way the treated pows, refused to surrender when they were beaten and the kamakazi attacks, all of these things to the American war fighter was considered cowardly and they saw the Japanese as subhuman. You can see it in Admiral Halsey's victory message to his sailors:

"Men...the war is ended. You, in conjunction with your brothers in arms, of all services and all branches of all services have contributed inestimably to this final result. You have brought an implacable, treacherous, and barbaric foe to his kneed in abject surrender. This is the first time in recorded history of the misbegotten Japanese race that they as a nation have been forced to submit to this humiliation...."
 

Sparta

Former Staff
Aug 2006
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Connecticut
Americans have a history of genociding populations if that is what you consider to be a "Good Card". I bet those segregated army units where the soldiers got substandard supplies and more dangerous assignments compared to the "regular units" was another "Good Card"
Oh really? That's Americans who do that, not all of humanity? What do you know of the history of the Comanche, of the Mashentucket? You clearly don't know your own. Go read a book.
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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Toronto
Oh really? That's Americans who do that, not all of humanity? What do you know of the history of the Comanche, of the Mashentucket? You clearly don't know your own. Go read a book, clown.
That's true.

US (and Spanish, French, and British before them) authorities committed all sorts of nastiness against the natives in North America.

But if one looks at how Russia conquered the Caucasus or Siberia, for example; how France once conquered Algeria; how China conquered Inner Mongolia, Tibet, and Xinjiang/Uighur Turkestan; how Ottoman Turkey conquered various Arab lands and nations in the Balkans; etc, etc.

The Roman Empire also waged brutal conquests and counter-insurgency campaigns against the Celts, the Germanic tribes, the Gauls in ancient France, the various tribes in the Balkans also, et al.

In short, the US is not unique, at all.

The entire history of our world is nastiness, wars and conquests...

It is what it is.
 
Mar 2010
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out
Today, 74 years after dropping atomic bombs on Japanese civilians, Americans have moved to genociding themselves with automatic and semi-automatic mental illnesses.

The rest of the world might think it an improvement.
 
Mar 2019
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On a drive-by
Today, 74 years after dropping atomic bombs on Japanese civilians, Americans have moved to genociding themselves with automatic and semi-automatic mental illnesses.

The rest of the world might think it an improvement.

That was a pretty ridiculous statement
 
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Sparta

Former Staff
Aug 2006
22,615
13,348
Connecticut
Today, 74 years after dropping atomic bombs on Japanese civilians, Americans have moved to genociding themselves with automatic and semi-automatic mental illnesses.

The rest of the world might think it an improvement.
You just outdumbed every dumb thing you've ever said, congratulations, there must be an award somewhere in paris with your name on it
 
Sep 2014
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South FL
Usually in warfare one side relents, the other gives terms, obviously unfavorable and they then move forward. That's exactly what happened in WW1 of course, but WW2 was different but naturally we assume that we must demand 'unconditional surrender'

In some ways unconditional surrender is a misnomer. There actually are all kinds of implied conditions even when unconditional surrender is demanded.

In WW2 the pre-war experience dealing with Hitler and Ribbentrop's duplicity is the Allies couldn't trust dealing with Hitler. Unconditional surrender was the result.

After Germany'd defeat, Japan saw the handwriting on the wall and diplomatic feelers were sent out to Moscow (still neutral with Japan) to try to negotiate the end of the war.

The Allies meet at Potsdam to demand unconditional surrender promising utter destruction. At this point I suppose it can be debated whether insisting on unconditional surrender, with respect to Japan, was rational.

The Japanese response to this was mokusatsu which was taken as a rejection by the Allies. Assuming the demand for unconditional surrender is moral/rational then at that point dropping the FIRST bomb is rational to achieve that end.

But this is where it kind've gets tricky because there isn't one bomb dropped, there's two.

Truman after Hiroshima:

'We are now prepared to obliterate more rapidly and completely every productive enterprise the Japanese have above ground in any city. We shall destroy their docks, their factories, and their communications. Let there be no mistake; we shall completely destroy Japan's power to make war. It was to spare the Japanese people from utter destruction that the ultimatum of July 26 was issued at Potsdam. Their leaders promptly rejected that ultimatum. If they do not now accept our terms they may expect a rain of ruin from the air, the like of which has never been seen on this earth....'

The Japanese of course also see the Soviet Union invade Manchuria and they know the jig is up. They are also confused as to what actually hit them. At that point the Japanese want to accept Potsdam subject to retaining the Emperor.

Nagasaki is then bombed and I would suggest too quickly after Hiroshima.

Eventually the Allies would let the Japanese keep the Emperor.

So the whole question of the necessity of the action can be questioned
 
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