Was it right to drop two atomic bombs on Japan?

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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FWIW, the highest total number of casualties of this event is up to 226,000 in both Hiroshima & Nagasaki: Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki - Wikipedia

When we look at the tens of millions lost in WWII overall, including, for instance, up to 22,000,000 Chinese civilians killed by the Japanese: Second Sino-Japanese War - Wikipedia

It's REALLY not THAT significant a number, in context, is it?

The Japanese started the war in the Pacific. And they paid the price for that. Natural order of things.
 
Dec 2018
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There is the discussion that Japan was planning to surrender and that we were aware of this. I do think the bombs saved lives. They showed the true destructive power and I think they have kept others from using them. But? I am not sure what would have happened has we not dropped them.

The campaign against civilians was wrong. But it was total war. And the Second World War was a continuation of the pointless First World War. So? Idk. Take that for what you will.
 
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The atomic bomb attacks ended the war and saved countless lives.

Therefore, they were the right acts.
How did they save more lives than simply allowing japan to surrender? Without an invasion.


Things have to make sense. Not just feel good.
 
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There had been negotiations, but Japan refused to surrender, and the intensity of the opposition to the US on Okinawa demonstrated that to prosecute the war further would cost dearly. IIRC the US wanted to depose the Emperor and install a far less 'militant' regime, and that was the sticking point for the Japanese.

I agree though that is was a false dichotomy, as the US was in a position to starve the Japanese into submission via blockade.


Were the bombings right? No, but they were expedient.
Were they refusing to surrender?

I thought they were attempting to negotiate one.
 
Jul 2014
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How did they save more lives than simply allowing japan to surrender? Without an invasion.


Things have to make sense. Not just feel good.
We didn't know when, or if they were going to surrender.

They had already lost the war and they knew that.

But, they wanted to fight to the last man to save their Emperor.

And, try to inflict as much pain on us as possible to try for better surrender terms.

The two A-bombs just helped them come to the right decision a bit sooner...
 
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We didn't know when, or if they were going to surrender.

They had already lost the war and they knew that.

But, they wanted to fight to the last man to save their Emperor.

And, try to inflict as much pain on us as possible to try for better surrender terms.

The two A-bombs just helped them come to the right decision a bit sooner...
The only possible way any American would have been hurt would be in an invasion. So .... Don't invade.

It is not sensible to say that if not for the A bombs there would have been an invasion. Just don't invade. Done. Don't invade. THAT is the alternative to the bombs. Not invading and them surrendering.

Even if this justification for the first bomb made sense, it certainly doesnt justify the second.

I'm not just bashing the US. Anyone at the time who'd made the bomb would have used it. If Japan had made it they'd have used it. If my grandpa had made it he'd have used it.
 
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The only possible way any American would have been hurt would be in an invasion. So .... Don't invade.

It is not sensible to say that if not for the A bombs there would have been an invasion. Just don't invade. Done. Don't invade. THAT is the alternative to the bombs. Not invading and them surrendering.

Even if this justification for the first bomb made sense, it certainly doesnt justify the second.

I'm not just bashing the US. Anyone at the time who'd made the bomb would have used it. If Japan had made it they'd have used it. If my grandpa had made it he'd have used it.
Wrong.

The second A-bomb is what pushed them into submission.

It was absolutely justified, and it saved countless lives, mostly Japanese.

And, we were gonna invade.

We had already set the plans into motion.

Whether or not you think we SHOULD have invaded or not, does not matter.

We were on the way...
 
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My whole life I'd heard about the Dec 08 1941 attacks, specifically on Canadian soldiers in Hong Kong.

The "sneak attacks" by an enemy "trying to take over the world".

I was well into my 30s before seriously confronting the logic of being attacked in one of dozens of brutally conquered colonies all over the world, and it being THEM who were trying to take over the world.

Read up on the occupations of Hawaii and the Philippines. Keeping in mind Hawaii became a state in 1959.
 
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Wrong.

The second A-bomb is what pushed them into submission.

It was absolutely justified, and it saved countless lives, mostly Japanese.

And, we were gonna invade.

We had already set the plans into motion.

Whether or not you think we SHOULD have invaded or not, does not matter.

We were on the way...
That makes absolutely no sense.

I, myself, decided to do something harmful. My own decision. And then I decided the only way I would not do it was to do something less harmful. So the second action is justified because it prevented the first?

You did something to stop yourself from doing something you yourself had decided to do?

That's nonsense.

Just don't do it.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
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Were they refusing to surrender?

I thought they were attempting to negotiate one.
An interesting read:

Would Japan have surrendered without the atomic bombings?

I think it's also important to remember that the US didn't know with certainty what Japan or Russia was thinking, Japan didn't know with certainty what the US and Russia were thinking, and Russia didn't know with certainty what the US and Japan were thinking.