We need a real War on Christmas

Jan 2012
3,570
1,655
Vacaville, CA
#1
We need a real War on Christmas . . . shopping. We can help clean the planet by reducing gift-giving during the holidays. Household waste increases by 25 percent between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day: an extra one million tons a week in US landfills, much of it merchandise boxes, gift wrapping and discarded Xmas trees.

Nearly 60 percent of Americans receive unwanted gifts during the holidays, of which $90 billion worth are returned. And half of that winds up in landfills because it is often cheaper for a retailer to trash an item than resell it. That’s a lot of energy and resources totally wasted. And, of course, there are the millions of gallons of gasoline consumed by people shopping for gifts.

One way to alleviate the problem is to buy people gift cards that are redeemable at “big box” stores so people can use the cards to buy essentials like groceries or take their time to buy what they really want or need. Or we could limit gift-giving to children. How about “Christmas is for Kids” as a slogan?

Sources:

https://www.care2.com/greenliving/ho...landfills.html

https://money.cnn.com/2017/12/26/new...ill/index.html
 
Jan 2012
3,570
1,655
Vacaville, CA
#4
We need to take the MarXism out of Xmas. People think they are entitled to free stuff from an old white man with a beard, whether he is Santa Claus or Uncle Sam.
 
Aug 2018
2,433
3,811
Vancouver
#5
My family spends about $25 for gifts for adults. That’ll get you a couple books in a series, or a light sweater. A bottle of whiskey. A gift basket with coffees or cheese or something. Or two famy members will combine for a board game or something.

In Ottawa I remember talking to coworkers who were watching adults and kids in their families opening two or three iPads each on Christmas morning. These were people that already had iPads, and didn’t even need one more.

Then 3 months later they’re talking about all their debt.

I swear to God, it almost makes me understand the Taliban.
 
Jan 2016
52,661
48,997
Colorado
#6
We need to take the MarXism out of Xmas. People think they are entitled to free stuff from an old white man with a beard, whether he is Santa Claus or Uncle Sam.
Ironically enough, one of my Christmas presents last year, from one of my nephews, was a collection of Marx Brothers movies on Blu-Ray.

I did ask for it. It WAS something I wanted. I can guarantee you it did not go to a landfill.
 

One

Former Staff
Dec 2006
11,905
10,667
----> X <----
#7
We need a real War on Christmas . . . shopping. We can help clean the planet by reducing gift-giving during the holidays. Household waste increases by 25 percent between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day: an extra one million tons a week in US landfills, much of it merchandise boxes, gift wrapping and discarded Xmas trees.

Nearly 60 percent of Americans receive unwanted gifts during the holidays, of which $90 billion worth are returned. And half of that winds up in landfills because it is often cheaper for a retailer to trash an item than resell it. That’s a lot of energy and resources totally wasted. And, of course, there are the millions of gallons of gasoline consumed by people shopping for gifts.

One way to alleviate the problem is to buy people gift cards that are redeemable at “big box” stores so people can use the cards to buy essentials like groceries or take their time to buy what they really want or need. Or we could limit gift-giving to children. How about “Christmas is for Kids” as a slogan?

Sources:

https://www.care2.com/greenliving/ho...landfills.html

https://money.cnn.com/2017/12/26/new...ill/index.html
We need to take the MarXism out of Xmas. People think they are entitled to free stuff from an old white man with a beard, whether he is Santa Claus or Uncle Sam.
If it makes you happy, I won't add you to my christmas(not xmas) list
 
Jun 2014
46,592
46,335
United States
#9
We need a real War on Christmas . . . shopping. We can help clean the planet by reducing gift-giving during the holidays. Household waste increases by 25 percent between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day: an extra one million tons a week in US landfills, much of it merchandise boxes, gift wrapping and discarded Xmas trees.

Nearly 60 percent of Americans receive unwanted gifts during the holidays, of which $90 billion worth are returned. And half of that winds up in landfills because it is often cheaper for a retailer to trash an item than resell it. That’s a lot of energy and resources totally wasted. And, of course, there are the millions of gallons of gasoline consumed by people shopping for gifts.

One way to alleviate the problem is to buy people gift cards that are redeemable at “big box” stores so people can use the cards to buy essentials like groceries or take their time to buy what they really want or need. Or we could limit gift-giving to children. How about “Christmas is for Kids” as a slogan?

Sources:

https://www.care2.com/greenliving/ho...landfills.html

https://money.cnn.com/2017/12/26/new...ill/index.html

There has always been a contingent of people in the US who oppose the commercialization of Christmas. I do understand their point of view.

My own family has reduced the amount of gifting that we engage in for Christmas compared to what was typical for us decades ago.
 
Last edited:
Sep 2012
14,230
18,117
SoCal
#10
We need a real War on Christmas . . . shopping. We can help clean the planet by reducing gift-giving during the holidays. Household waste increases by 25 percent between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day: an extra one million tons a week in US landfills, much of it merchandise boxes, gift wrapping and discarded Xmas trees.

Nearly 60 percent of Americans receive unwanted gifts during the holidays, of which $90 billion worth are returned. And half of that winds up in landfills because it is often cheaper for a retailer to trash an item than resell it. That’s a lot of energy and resources totally wasted. And, of course, there are the millions of gallons of gasoline consumed by people shopping for gifts.

One way to alleviate the problem is to buy people gift cards that are redeemable at “big box” stores so people can use the cards to buy essentials like groceries or take their time to buy what they really want or need. Or we could limit gift-giving to children. How about “Christmas is for Kids” as a slogan?

Sources:

https://www.care2.com/greenliving/ho...landfills.html

https://money.cnn.com/2017/12/26/new...ill/index.html
My daughter and I have resolved our situation. Her birthday is two months before Xmas and mine is two months after, so we have "birthmas". We give each other little things we really need or want during the four months (no waiting for surprises on Xmas). Her two male BFFs (for more than 20 years) get movie ticket or game gift cards from me. No muss, no fuss, we get what we like and can enjoy it without waiting or guessing and no one is disappointed. I have "stuff" in bags from 3 Xmases past...will be donating it.

Doin' our part...
 

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