We need a real War on Christmas

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,270
31,918
Toronto
#11
At least you guys don't have to deal with wasted Santas all over the place lmao

You know, many Russian parents arrange for actors dressed up as Ded Moroz, Grandpa Frost, their answer to Santa, and his granddaughter and helper Snegurochka, Snow Girl, to visit their kids at home, have whole parties and such for them

This being Russia, along the way, plenty of parents, naturally, pour them champagne, wine, vodka, whatever. That's just the way it is there, you share alcohol with your guests, Russian hospitality (and if offered, it is rude and disrespectful for a guest to refuse; not that a Russian would refuse free booze haha)

And these guys often hit dozens of homes that one holiday night.

By the end of it, plenty of them get like this
:D
 
Jun 2014
46,592
46,335
United States
#12
This being Russia, along the way, plenty of parents, naturally, pour them champagne, wine, vodka, whatever. That's just the way it is there, you share alcohol with your guests, Russian hospitality (and if offered, it is rude and disrespectful for a guest to refuse; not that a Russian would refuse free booze haha)

And these guys often hit dozens of homes that one holiday night.

By the end of it, plenty of them get like this
:D

Passing the cup of wonder is an integral yuletide tradition. ;)
 
Jan 2016
52,661
48,998
Colorado
#13
There has always been a contingent of people in the US who oppose the commercialization of Christmas. I do understand their point of view.

My own family has reduced the amount of gifting that we engage in for Christmas compared to what was typical for us decades ago.
My family has gone through the same process. Decades ago, when both of my nephews were boys, they were indulged a lot with presents at Christmas, and that carried off to the adults. Now that they're both adults, all of us get presents at Christmas worth maybe in the range of $60-$80, and we always exchange 'wish lists' beforehand, so that we're not going to be getting anything we don't want.

Edit: LOL, that would have been just a couple of decades ago, I guess.....
 
Likes: The Man
Jun 2014
46,592
46,335
United States
#14
My family has gone through the same process. Decades ago, when both of my nephews were boys, they were indulged a lot with presents at Christmas, and that carried off to the adults. Now that they're both adults, all of us get presents at Christmas worth maybe in the range of $60-$80, and we always exchange 'wish lists' beforehand, so that we're not going to be getting anything we don't want.

Edit: LOL, that would have been just a couple of decades ago, I guess.....

Our situation has evolved over the years. There was a time when there would be around 40 kids at a Christmas party at my parents' or grandparents' home. Our family is much smaller now. Gifts have kind of taken a back seat to just spending time together at Christmas.
 
Aug 2018
2,433
3,811
Vancouver
#15
At least you guys don't have to deal with wasted Santas all over the place lmao

You know, many Russian parents arrange for actors dressed up as Ded Moroz, Grandpa Frost, their answer to Santa, and his granddaughter and helper Snegurochka, Snow Girl, to visit their kids at home, have whole parties and such for them

This being Russia, along the way, plenty of parents, naturally, pour them champagne, wine, vodka, whatever. That's just the way it is there, you share alcohol with your guests, Russian hospitality (and if offered, it is rude and disrespectful for a guest to refuse; not that a Russian would refuse free booze haha)

And these guys often hit dozens of homes that one holiday night.

By the end of it, plenty of them get like this
:D
I can’t decide if this is wrong or charming.

I’d probably feel that way a lot in Russia.
 
Likes: The Man

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,270
31,918
Toronto
#17
I can’t decide if this is wrong or charming.

I’d probably feel that way a lot in Russia.
It is a unique place, for sure... I was just talking to a lady who recently been back to Moscow on some family business. She recounted how she took a taxi from the Sheremetyevo Airport there. Not only did the guy drive like a maniac, but, at one point, one of his tires blew out, and he said, don't worry about it, will fix that later, and just drove on, essentially on three fucking wheels! She thought was gonna die that night :D Been away too long :)
 
Dec 2006
8,658
10,692
required field
#18
We need to take the MarXism out of Xmas. People think they are entitled to free stuff from an old white man with a beard, whether he is Santa Claus or Uncle Sam.
I logged in just to thank your first couple posts, but this one makes me LOL. Christmas is the most capitalist holiday ever, as you aptly demonstrated in your OP. Very few people above the age of 8 believe in Santa Claus, so your comment is pretty silly. :p
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
74,653
43,378
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#19
This being Russia, along the way, plenty of parents, naturally, pour them champagne, wine, vodka, whatever. That's just the way it is there, you share alcohol with your guests, Russian hospitality (and if offered, it is rude and disrespectful for a guest to refuse; not that a Russian would refuse free booze haha)
I'd have to be quite careful, since I cannot drink at all, at least not without dire consequences. And after 29 years of sobriety, I wouldn't really want to start over again (assuming I survived...).
 
Jan 2016
52,661
48,998
Colorado
#20
I logged in just to thank your first couple posts, but this one makes me LOL. Christmas is the most capitalist holiday ever, as you aptly demonstrated in your OP. Very few people above the age of 8 believe in Santa Claus, so your comment is pretty silly. :p
There are some exceptions. In the 1990's, the state of Texas executed a man whose IQ was so low that he believed Santa Claus was going to swoop in and save him from being executed, right up to the last moment. He was in his mid-40's, and his IQ was in the mid 60's.
 

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