well, are we still opposed to a democracy?

Jan 2014
16,539
6,356
south
#1
we have seen what we have now in it's most ugly form. anybody ready to consider the benefits of a constitutional democracy yet? and no, it will not magically solve all our problems.
 
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Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
76,571
45,761
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#4
We do have a form of democracy. Not the one you want, but a democracy nonetheless.
Yes, we have a constitutional representative democracy. I believe, however, that OP wishes to remove the word "representative" from that phrase and have a pure democracy. Do I presume correctly, @bonehead?
 
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Jan 2014
16,539
6,356
south
#5
Yes, we have a constitutional representative democracy. I believe, however, that OP wishes to remove the word "representative" from that phrase and have a pure democracy. Do I presume correctly, @bonehead?
quite correct - which is a true constitutional democracy. I would, of course, wish to have a few modifications to stabilize it further.
 

StanStill

Former Staff
Dec 2013
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Work
#8
quite correct - which is a true constitutional democracy. I would, of course, wish to have a few modifications to stabilize it further.
meh... Any democracy that spells out the parameters of how elections will happen in its constitution is a "true" constitutional democracy. The idea that there is some pure form of democracy is a bit dishonest, really. It's like a perfect circle. We can all think about it, but no perfect circle actually exists in the real world.

Secondly, if such a democracy allows for there to be an imbalance in the distribution of power, (that is to say, some incredibly wealthy people and many impoverished people and everything in between) then it's not a "true" democracy. Wealth inequality is power inequality, and power inequality is antithetical to democracy. In effect, if people don't have democratic control over what they do to survive (that is to say, their job or industry) and instead are just employees rented by a business owner or corporation, then how "true" is the democracy we are talking about?

But anyway, what are the modifications you had in mind?
 
Jan 2014
16,539
6,356
south
#9
meh... Any democracy that spells out the parameters of how elections will happen in its constitution is a "true" constitutional democracy. The idea that there is some pure form of democracy is a bit dishonest, really. It's like a perfect circle. We can all think about it, but no perfect circle actually exists in the real world.

Secondly, if such a democracy allows for there to be an imbalance in the distribution of power, (that is to say, some incredibly wealthy people and many impoverished people and everything in between) then it's not a "true" democracy. Wealth inequality is power inequality, and power inequality is antithetical to democracy. In effect, if people don't have democratic control over what they do to survive (that is to say, their job or industry) and instead are just employees rented by a business owner or corporation, then how "true" is the democracy we are talking about?

But anyway, what are the modifications you had in mind?
your questions are very good and deserve an answer. I am speaking a true democracy, where the citizens make the decisions by majority vote. that, of course, leads to your next question concerning modifications. ,first, bills would be passed (or not) based on the absolute majority of the registered voters. second, all bill would be required to, in the body of the bill, contain the cost and method of financing - be it an additional tax or a budget change. and yes, the budget would be part of that.
 
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