What has Trump done for people who sincerely sought his help?

Sep 2013
45,078
36,157
On a hill
#31
When I listened to this report, I got the impression black lung is a given for coal miners.

I'm sure there are many who avoid it. And in the locales where people mine coal, I'm sure smoking is popular in the communities at large. But it would seem to me that black lung works differently from smoking illnesses, in that it's about particulate matter scaring the lungs.

'I Figured It Was Going To Be A Horrible Death, And It Probably Will Be'
I would think its more like asbestos and smoking - either can cause cancer by itself, but cancer risks increase if one is exposed to both.
 
May 2012
68,353
13,602
By the wall
#32
Speaking as a Veteran, you are full of shit, the paperwork and bureaucracy to do that is horrendous, I have been trying for months to switch to a dialysis center literally across the street from my house and still have to drive miles and miles to another suburb to get treatment. #Trumpcult, reality actually is not #alternativefacts
Your inability to navigate governmental regulations is on you.

Most have heaped praise on Trump for doing this and making their lives easier.
 
Likes: Izzshemovin
Sep 2013
45,078
36,157
On a hill
#33
Well then coal mines should refuse to hire workers who smoke. Make it a strict policy with testing. I have to wonder why they haven't done this already.

Although getting rid of this disease doesn't make the risk to public health from the cradle to grave pollution caused by coal mining, transportation, processing, burning and waste production any better. All in all, coal is the dirtiest and most destructive form of energy available. IMO encouraging it by giving tax breaks to coal companies and easing regulation and calling it "clean coal" isn't wise, but here we are.
In the past, companies that use asbestos paid for smoking cessation programs in house for their employees.
 
Likes: Blueneck
Sep 2013
45,078
36,157
On a hill
#34
Coal is just about dead. It will be a non issue in the next 10 years or so. The mines that are still operating are having issues with hiring employees...they can't pass a drug test in W VA and Kentucky...the center of the opioid crisis. I would imagine that we are importing our coal from other Countries at this point. The sad part...it left a lot of poverty behind. I don't enjoy seeing tax payers lose like this. In Kentucky and W VA, I think this is the reason for the opioid crisis in their States....you still have to eat, selling pills replaced coal. I am just glad in my families case, I have only 1 cousin who works in the mines and he was able to send their kids to college so they don't have to dig coal. My Uncles made sure my first cousins were able to go to college by working 7 days a week in a coal mine to pay for it. It is the people aspect that bothers me....we don't have a lot of people who are paying meaningful taxes theses days since the working class is pretty much gone. Being pill dealers and Dollar Store jobs will never replace the tax base and their people are suffering for it.

We are still going to have environmental issues with coal globally, other Countries don't give a shit about clean air and water and will dig as much coal as they can sell. Their working class is increasing while we are losing ours rapidly. If nothing changes with the tax base, the US will not be able to support their safety net programs...as we are seeing in Kentucky. No one cares about the people in the south just like they don't care about the poor who live in the inner cities. Less and less people are going to college...so with automation threats along with environmental threats....I am not sure where people are going to work and pay taxes to support the Country. We should have jumped on replacement jobs with green energy decades ago instead of waiting until we have large pockets of poverty. The US is always a day late and a dollar short and we learn the hard way.
That would make the left pushing for green energy, and tuition free college at public institutions for those who qualify the ones who do care.
 
Mar 2012
57,411
38,977
New Hampshire
#35
That would make the left pushing for green energy, and tuition free college at public institutions for those who qualify the ones who do care.
There was a link on here a year or two ago about a plant in Kansas that makes wind turbines. Just having the facility there changed the workers and citizens minds about renewable energy. I think if companies opened plants in places like KY and WVA and gave jobs to the kids of these people their minds would change as well. Many dont like renewables because they feel its shoved at them via laws mandating solar or wind usage etc. Once they work in it and understand it and are able to make a living, their minds change.
 
Likes: labrea
Sep 2013
45,078
36,157
On a hill
#36
There was a link on here a year or two ago about a plant in Kansas that makes wind turbines. Just having the facility there changed the workers and citizens minds about renewable energy. I think if companies opened plants in places like KY and WVA and gave jobs to the kids of these people their minds would change as well. Many dont like renewables because they feel its shoved at them via laws mandating solar or wind usage etc. Once they work in it and understand it and are able to make a living, their minds change.
Unfortunately the new capitalist model is luring business with money, and free gifts to locate in their communities. Would coal country be interested in shelling out to lure business it considers worthless?
 
Mar 2012
57,411
38,977
New Hampshire
#37
Unfortunately the new capitalist model is luring business with money, and free gifts to locate in their communities. Would coal country be interested in shelling out to lure business it considers worthless?
I think thats part of the problem. A lot of these communities are too poor to hand out goodies to companies to relocate there. The execs are looking at states and towns willing to give massive tax breaks. So they dont consider any of these communities unless they have some personal connection. Coal has dealt with this before in OH and PA where they shrunk and other industries came up and thrived. They dont have the monies they used to.
 
Likes: labrea

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
54,799
41,971
Ohio
#39
Coal is just about dead. It will be a non issue in the next 10 years or so. The mines that are still operating are having issues with hiring employees...they can't pass a drug test in W VA and Kentucky...the center of the opioid crisis. I would imagine that we are importing our coal from other Countries at this point. The sad part...it left a lot of poverty behind. I don't enjoy seeing tax payers lose like this. In Kentucky and W VA, I think this is the reason for the opioid crisis in their States....you still have to eat, selling pills replaced coal. I am just glad in my families case, I have only 1 cousin who works in the mines and he was able to send their kids to college so they don't have to dig coal. My Uncles made sure my first cousins were able to go to college by working 7 days a week in a coal mine to pay for it. It is the people aspect that bothers me....we don't have a lot of people who are paying meaningful taxes theses days since the working class is pretty much gone. Being pill dealers and Dollar Store jobs will never replace the tax base and their people are suffering for it.

We are still going to have environmental issues with coal globally, other Countries don't give a shit about clean air and water and will dig as much coal as they can sell. Their working class is increasing while we are losing ours rapidly. If nothing changes with the tax base, the US will not be able to support their safety net programs...as we are seeing in Kentucky. No one cares about the people in the south just like they don't care about the poor who live in the inner cities. Less and less people are going to college...so with automation threats along with environmental threats....I am not sure where people are going to work and pay taxes to support the Country. We should have jumped on replacement jobs with green energy decades ago instead of waiting until we have large pockets of poverty. The US is always a day late and a dollar short and we learn the hard way.
I would add that the public needs to wise TF up about the idea of "company towns" which were never a healthy thing. City planners need to try to attract and nurture small businesses as well as larger ones. This idea of giving huge tax abatements to lure companies promising to hire thousands of people needs to be curtailed as it makes the entire population dependent on the whims of the company.

This has happened time and time again in places like WV and they have become a slave to the coal industry, where the have catered to it to the neglect of other industries, like tourism. Sadly, casinos (which I believe aren't healthy for a community overall) are becoming a better alternative to coal mines, but the jobs pay poorly. I realize coal is going by the wayside, but we're still paying the price in cleanups of decades of coal ash piling up and as coal companies go bankrupt, they aren't going to contribute to cost.

And if the president really cared about this country he'd spend more time promoting small business and the idea of consumers shopping for American made products in lieu of buying cheaper Chinese made products from Walmart. Instead he dwells on the evil Democrats and the joy of paying tariffs instead of people voluntarily buying products made here.

With all the attention he is able to garner I often think how amazing it would be if used his powers for good instead of his selfish, egotistical whims & ill conceived policies.
 
Mar 2012
57,411
38,977
New Hampshire
#40
I also get the feeling that these voters feel mainstream establishment politicians have failed them. Nothing ever changes for them. So they tend towards ones like Trump, Sanders, Warren etc who are a bit out of the establishment box. They are a bit desperate.