What makes kids violent?

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
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#92
IMHO it is a factor. Boys especially NEED a male father figure in her life, a man to show them a proper example. Otherwise, plenty would latch on to others they come across, potentially - bad people, who would teach them BAD examples. That's how kids end up involved in crime and worse, extremism, as I said here: Active shooter
I was hoping the statement was based on a study, though. Everyone has an opinion on this; I am interested in whether there is a statistical basis for the statement.
 
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#93
I was hoping the statement was based on a study, though. Everyone has an opinion on this; I am interested in whether there is a statistical basis for the statement.
The issue has been studied in great detail... the problem isn't finding a singular study, it's that there are too many to choose from each focusing on different elements.

Statistics

This one has a summary of studied statistics and some references to the actual studies done.
 
Jul 2011
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#94
Pretty much useless to know WHY a problem exists, what causes the problem, if you have no idea in the world how to correct, or at least reduce, the problem.
 
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#96
The issue has been studied in great detail... the problem isn't finding a singular study, it's that there are too many to choose from each focusing on different elements.

Statistics

This one has a summary of studied statistics and some references to the actual studies done.
Here's the takeaway from this study:

In a Harvard University longitudinal study conducted over a seven-year period, researchers studied 440 children ranging from ages 7 to 13 to determine which factors contribute most significantly to the development of violent behavior in children. The study concluded that exposure to physical punishment, impulsiveness, having aggressive thoughts, and to some extent, poor self-esteem were the strongest predictors of violent behavior.

Violent Behavior in Children: Causes & Prevention | Study.com
 
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#97
Crimea is a whole special case in itself... Even before 2014, within Ukraine, after '91, they actually always been known as a heavily criminal area. Always had own powerful organised crime groups, which tightly and violently controlled things, so that even guys from Ukraine's other mafia centres, now-separatist Donetsk, and Odessa, would not try setting foot in there.

They also, the Slavic mob, waged war with Crimean Tatar gangs, who tried to set up own turfs when they began returning from exile (from Central Asia, where Stalin sent them after WWII) in the 80s and 90s. The Slavs were better armed and the local police were usually on their side, so, the Tatars usually suffered much heavier casualties.

There was, for example, an incident in early 2000s, where Slavic villagers clashed with Tatars who had illegally taken over some land on their fields to build homes for themselves, as they often practised (because many of their own original villages and homes were already settled by Russians and Ukrainians when they came back and they had nowhere else to live). The Tatars were armed with hunting rifles and clubs and such. The Slavic villagers called the mob for help, who showed up with pistols and AKs. Long story short, five Tatars were killed there. Nobody ever convicted for it.

After 2014, I believe the local bosses initially celebrated, because one of their own Sergey Aksyonov, aka "Goblin", whom you posted up there, was made Governor by Putin, things were looking good for them. But it quickly turned into a bloodbath, as the locals quickly found themselves under assault by much larger and more powerful "brigades" from mainland Russia, who moved in to take over their narcotics, illegal tobacco, and other thriving markets there. Some bosses from Donetsk also tried to grab their slices of the pie, but it usually did not end well for them, getting in the way of the mainland organisations.

In 2015, for example, legendary Donetsk crime boss Mikhail Lyashko, aka "Misha Kosoy", who was said to have ran the counterfeit alcohol and tobacco business in all of Donbass

was riddled with bullets in his car in Gurzuf (suburb of Yalta) along with his two bodyguards: В Крыму убит криминальный авторитет Мишаня Косой, один из самых близких к Ринату Ахметову. Донецкие блатные срочно выехали в Крым - НОВОСТИ - Gorlovka.ua

Among many other deaths there post-2014. It became crazy there, for real. I know folks here, originally from Crimea, one guy told me, his brother has a grocery shop there. He been paying "protection" for years to some local guys. Then, December 2014, some others clearly from the mainland (by their accents he could tell, Crimeans speak Russian differently than Mainlanders) came in, and one says, you gonna pay us now. He says, well, I am already paying so and so [names the local boss]. Mainland guy takes out his phone, shows him a pic of that guy he just named, with a bullet hole in his forehead, him you are talking about? The guy had no more questions or objections, as you imagine...

At least, apparently, it has quieted down now. Late last year, there was some kind of a big conference in Moscow, where all kinds of mainland bosses came together with Donetsk guys and Crimea guys, and finally redivided everything in Crimea for good, all the turfs and the business. The locals, obviously, had to give up a lot, but, at least, there's peace now...



Indeed. And that's another big issue over there. Russia is a world leader in divorces: Divorce rate in Russia will shock you: 829 divorces per 1000 marriages (2017 statistics) | EM

Lots of broken families there :(
I share your posts with my Russian-born Ukrainian wife. She concurs with your observations and has stories to tell of her own.

We had to find a "bribe arranger" to get our marriage license.

We met a fine capitalist selling plumbing supplies, the weird Soviet stuff, in one of Kiev's biggest flea markets. He paid (equivalent) $1,000/mo. rent, and $1,000/mo. "protection." He asked me, how much do you pay for protection in the US?

The "militia" are poorly paid and for sale.

Ditto for the courts. Her uncle was hit by an "official's" car. Her uncle got the ticket. Her cousin arranged the bribe, a big one.

As I understand, you're saying Russia and the DPR are worse??
 
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#98
Here's the takeaway from this study:

In a Harvard University longitudinal study conducted over a seven-year period, researchers studied 440 children ranging from ages 7 to 13 to determine which factors contribute most significantly to the development of violent behavior in children. The study concluded that exposure to physical punishment, impulsiveness, having aggressive thoughts, and to some extent, poor self-esteem were the strongest predictors of violent behavior.

Violent Behavior in Children: Causes & Prevention | Study.com
Just to be clear, that these are quite consistent results, just looking at different sides of the coin.

What I mean; a distant father or abusive father will lead to a child having those traits, and kids with those traits windup statistically with those violent behaviours.

The issue has been studied in depth.
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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#99
I share your posts with my Russian-born Ukrainian wife. She concurs with your observations and has stories to tell of her own.

We had to find a "bribe arranger" to get our marriage license.

We met a fine capitalist selling plumbing supplies, the weird Soviet stuff, in one of Kiev's biggest flea markets. He paid (equivalent) $1,000/mo. rent, and $1,000/mo. "protection." He asked me, how much do you pay for protection in the US?

The "militia" are poorly paid and for sale.

Ditto for the courts. Her uncle was hit by an "official's" car. Her uncle got the ticket. Her cousin arranged the bribe, a big one.

As I understand, you're saying Russia and the DPR are worse??
Well, again, the Donbass, and to an extent Crimea as well, had long been the most criminalised areas in Ukraine, along with Odessa, but that one declined in more recent years. Western Ukrainians have own crime, of course, but, they never had such large, powerful organised crime structures, which had long enjoyed connections with and support from brothers in Russia across the border ;)

Donbass has pretty much always been considered the most criminal and corrupt area in Ukraine. I'm not gonna say who is better or worse, but that's just the way it is.

And yes, things like you describe with your wife's uncle are pretty much always resolved with bribes there, Ukraine, Russia, any ex-Soviet country... Those places are all corrupt to the core... :(
 
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