What paperless society?

Jan 2012
3,580
1,660
Vacaville, CA
#1
Electronic records and media were supposed to liberate us from paperwork and paper recordkeeping, while conserving forests used to produce paper products.

The promise rings hollow. Cybersecurity experts are suggesting states have a voter-verified paper record of every ballot cast to guard against Russian hackers. Many people are reluctant to do on-line banking, fearing some hacker will erase their accounts from the “cloud.” They want to be able to point to a paper statement and say, “This proves I have this money.”

When I reorder medicine online, a message on the page says, “Print this for your records.”

While newspaper print circulation has fallen, the New York Times still has a print circulation of more than 2.2 million.

California lawmakers are considering a ban on paper receipts, although a lot of that paper could be saved if retailers simply stopped extending the receipts with coupons and survey requests. The proposal smacks more of a move to require shoppers to use smart phones, which would then have an electronic receipt.

If we were truly in a paperless society, inkjet and laser printers would be as scarce as fax machines. Hardly. Best Buy, for example, has 276 different printers available. (They have only two combination fax-printers.)

Should we completely dismiss the idea of a paperless society?
 
Mar 2019
8,337
2,934
California
#3
Electronic records and media were supposed to liberate us from paperwork and paper recordkeeping, while conserving forests used to produce paper products.

The promise rings hollow. Cybersecurity experts are suggesting states have a voter-verified paper record of every ballot cast to guard against Russian hackers. Many people are reluctant to do on-line banking, fearing some hacker will erase their accounts from the “cloud.” They want to be able to point to a paper statement and say, “This proves I have this money.”

When I reorder medicine online, a message on the page says, “Print this for your records.”

While newspaper print circulation has fallen, the New York Times still has a print circulation of more than 2.2 million.

California lawmakers are considering a ban on paper receipts, although a lot of that paper could be saved if retailers simply stopped extending the receipts with coupons and survey requests. The proposal smacks more of a move to require shoppers to use smart phones, which would then have an electronic receipt.

If we were truly in a paperless society, inkjet and laser printers would be as scarce as fax machines. Hardly. Best Buy, for example, has 276 different printers available. (They have only two combination fax-printers.)

Should we completely dismiss the idea of a paperless society?
Yes.
 
Likes: MichelleZ
Jul 2011
80,446
46,022
Memphis, Tn.
#4
Electronic records and media were supposed to liberate us from paperwork and paper recordkeeping, while conserving forests used to produce paper products.

The promise rings hollow. Cybersecurity experts are suggesting states have a voter-verified paper record of every ballot cast to guard against Russian hackers. Many people are reluctant to do on-line banking, fearing some hacker will erase their accounts from the “cloud.” They want to be able to point to a paper statement and say, “This proves I have this money.”

When I reorder medicine online, a message on the page says, “Print this for your records.”

While newspaper print circulation has fallen, the New York Times still has a print circulation of more than 2.2 million.

California lawmakers are considering a ban on paper receipts, although a lot of that paper could be saved if retailers simply stopped extending the receipts with coupons and survey requests. The proposal smacks more of a move to require shoppers to use smart phones, which would then have an electronic receipt.

If we were truly in a paperless society, inkjet and laser printers would be as scarce as fax machines. Hardly. Best Buy, for example, has 276 different printers available. (They have only two combination fax-printers.)

Should we completely dismiss the idea of a paperless society?
That "promise" was just a sales gimmick, a slogan. Remember cable TV becoming popular? Why did the industry tell us should start paying for TV service when it had been free for decades? Well, you'll have more channels, but the biggie was "you would not have to watch commercials any more, ever!"
 
Mar 2019
755
1,193
TN
#5
The irony is, the paper industry is partly responsible for the fact we now have about 20 percent more trees today than we did 100 years ago. They realized they couldn’t depend on simply buying up old growth trees on family owned land. They embarked on an aggressive program of buying or long term leasing huge tracks of land where they harvest and then immediately replant. They also worked with smaller land owners who they’d pay for the timber harvested then give them seedling to replant and come back in 20 years and harvest again, paying for the timber and resupplying seedlings. Rinse and repeat. I spent many summers as a child playing under a canopy of young pines on my grandparents land.
 
Likes: Blueneck

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
55,137
42,572
Ohio
#6
We were also supposed to get rid of cash, but we still have it and oddly enough, when people us crypto currencies to do "bad things" they blame the currency more so than the people when the fact is they do the same thing with cash. Very weird, and falls in the category of the fed haters having a point.
 
Jun 2014
49,435
50,326
United States
#7
Electronic records and media were supposed to liberate us from paperwork and paper recordkeeping, while conserving forests used to produce paper products.

The promise rings hollow. Cybersecurity experts are suggesting states have a voter-verified paper record of every ballot cast to guard against Russian hackers. Many people are reluctant to do on-line banking, fearing some hacker will erase their accounts from the “cloud.” They want to be able to point to a paper statement and say, “This proves I have this money.”

When I reorder medicine online, a message on the page says, “Print this for your records.”

While newspaper print circulation has fallen, the New York Times still has a print circulation of more than 2.2 million.

California lawmakers are considering a ban on paper receipts, although a lot of that paper could be saved if retailers simply stopped extending the receipts with coupons and survey requests. The proposal smacks more of a move to require shoppers to use smart phones, which would then have an electronic receipt.

If we were truly in a paperless society, inkjet and laser printers would be as scarce as fax machines. Hardly. Best Buy, for example, has 276 different printers available. (They have only two combination fax-printers.)

Should we completely dismiss the idea of a paperless society?

We use far less paper than we would without electronic documents. Should we expect to eliminate paper entirely? I don't think so. I just can't envision myself wiping my ass with a floppy drive.

As for voting, I'd prefer to see no computers involved, and I say that as a person who makes a living installing computer based control systems.
 
Jul 2018
1,127
1,331
North Carolina
#8
I can remember when the military (Air Force) was talking about going paperless back in the mid - late 90's. In maintenance we cut down some paper use by using electronic TO's (Technical Orders), and other publications we used concerning aircraft. However, we were and still are a long way off before we will be completely paperless.
 
Likes: EnigmaO01