What the rich know about getting into college.

Nov 2006
54,378
20,301
#11
I was a legacy to the Univ of Michigan because of a grandfather, even a scholarship (but not enough to pay the bill). Coming from south Florida at the time I wasn't going to Michigan no how no way! Was accepted to every school I applied to (aboout 6) and went to the Univ of Florida. I think high dollar schools are a waste of money. I work for a company of about 4000 and you need a degree, but from where is really immaterial.
 
Sep 2017
5,469
6,530
Massachusetts
#12
That sounds pretty good, but wouldn't it be more efficient to just write a check for half a million?
Hehe. We don't have that kind of money. Well, we do, but it would come out of retirement savings and mean a much longer delay until retirement. I want to retire relatively young. My hope is that my daughter can at least put together a good enough application to get into a top-50 university. And, unlike me, she'll come away with no school debt, so she'll start life on an easier footing than I did (I came out with $120k in debt, back in the 90s).
 
Sep 2017
5,469
6,530
Massachusetts
#13
I was a legacy to the Univ of Michigan because of a grandfather, even a scholarship (but not enough to pay the bill). Coming from south Florida at the time I wasn't going to Michigan no how no way! Was accepted to every school I applied to (aboout 6) and went to the Univ of Florida. I think high dollar schools are a waste of money. I work for a company of about 4000 and you need a degree, but from where is really immaterial.
In my field, which law school you went to matters a lot, even well into your career. It probably doesn't make much sense, but that's the way it is.

If I had it to do over again, I suppose I would have gone to George Washington for undergrad. It wasn't anywhere near as prestigious, academically, as where I went, but they offered me a full ride, whereas where I went offered me nothing. GW had a thing where any National Merit Scholar got a full ride. I should have taken them up on it, but at the time I was a kid (just 17, when I started college) and had no clue about money.

I made a similar mistake in law school. I got into Washington University Law School, but I also got into a higher-ranking school and chose that, even though WU offered me a pretty substantial scholarship and the school I went to didn't offer me anything. That wasn't as big a mistake, though, since I think where I went opened some doors that wouldn't otherwise have been open to me., whereas I don't think my undergrad choice ended up mattering at all, since nobody looks at that when you have a grad degree.
 
Jul 2014
36,631
9,660
midwest
#14
Hehe. We don't have that kind of money. Well, we do, but it would come out of retirement savings and mean a much longer delay until retirement. I want to retire relatively young. My hope is that my daughter can at least put together a good enough application to get into a top-50 university. And, unlike me, she'll come away with no school debt, so she'll start life on an easier footing than I did (I came out with $120k in debt, back in the 90s).
Maybe you chose the wrong line of work.

Like me and most others on this obscure little political forum.

If you was a privileged Hollywood elite, or a rich CEO or lawyer, you could probably scratch a check like that on a regular basis.

You don't REALLY think those two TV star ladies are ever going to jail, do you?

I mean a REAL jail?

Maybe a country club type facility.

Are we looking forward to an OJ Simpson level stupidity "trial"?
 
Likes: Arkady
Mar 2012
55,595
37,063
New Hampshire
#15
In my field, which law school you went to matters a lot, even well into your career. It probably doesn't make much sense, but that's the way it is.

If I had it to do over again, I suppose I would have gone to George Washington for undergrad. It wasn't anywhere near as prestigious, academically, as where I went, but they offered me a full ride, whereas where I went offered me nothing. GW had a thing where any National Merit Scholar got a full ride. I should have taken them up on it, but at the time I was a kid (just 17, when I started college) and had no clue about money.

I made a similar mistake in law school. I got into Washington University Law School, but I also got into a higher-ranking school and chose that, even though WU offered me a pretty substantial scholarship and the school I went to didn't offer me anything. That wasn't as big a mistake, though, since I think where I went opened some doors that wouldn't otherwise have been open to me., whereas I don't think my undergrad choice ended up mattering at all, since nobody looks at that when you have a grad degree.
I think that depends on where you live. Some of my friends dont understand that but in reality if you live in the Greater Boston area, you are in direct competition with others from the Ivies and other great New England schools. Its not necessarily that way in too many other areas. I have friends in CA and getting a degree at the Univ of CA is great. But here in New England, a degree from Univ of NH, MA, VT or ME just isnt going to cut it. Its just how it is around here.
 
Sep 2017
5,469
6,530
Massachusetts
#16
I think that depends on where you live. Some of my friends dont understand that but in reality if you live in the Greater Boston area, you are in direct competition with others from the Ivies and other great New England schools. Its not necessarily that way in too many other areas. I have friends in CA and getting a degree at the Univ of CA is great. But here in New England, a degree from Univ of NH, MA, VT or ME just isnt going to cut it. Its just how it is around here.
Yeah. I've really noticed that in the Boston area, especially. I mean, think about the competition just from within Massachusetts: Harvard, MIT, BC, BU, Tufts, Brandeis, Wellesley, Amherst, Williams, WPI, Clark, Northeastern, Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Holy Cross, Babson, Bentley, Stonehill, Simmons, Hampshire, etc. You probably have ten institutions that would be the best in plenty of states, and twenty that are better than your average state school. And that's not to get into all the other elite New England schools for which Boston is the job market magnet: Bowdoin, Bates, Colby, Dartmouth, Brown, Middlebury, and even Yale. If you don't have a "nameplate" degree here, getting your foot in the door with a competitive employer is damned hard. A UNH or UMaine degree may be comparable to UMichigan or UTexas, etc., but in the local market, it just doesn't mean as much. Even UMass, which US News ranks as the 26th-best public university in the country, is seen as a safety school.
 
Likes: bajisima
Mar 2010
20,196
12,990
Indiana
#17
It sucks for people who don't have the inside information. I didn't come from poverty, but I came from the kind of middle class extended family where nobody we knew had ever even tried to get into an elite university. My parents communicated to me what they knew about it, which was basically: get good grades and stay out of trouble. But now, with the benefit of decades of acquired knowledge since then, I realize what a small portion of the puzzle that is, if you're applying to a highly competitive university. You can have straight A's with a tough course-load and not even get a second look from a top-20 university, if you're not checking any of their "diversity" boxes, your parents aren't alumni and/or sizable donors, and you don't have other factors to get you special consideration.... being a celebrity, a recruited athlete, or having an inside connection to someone important in the school. I feel bad for those kids who are busting their asses to be elite academics at the high school level, only to lose out on spots to kids who didn't make half the effort, but fit the right profile.
My twin and I were the first to go to college from both sides of my parent's family. Even attending a public state college, albeit a good reputation as having one of best business colleges in the nation, there was a lot of stuff we had to learn the hard way. My first experience was being called a moron in front of other students during registration because I allegedly showed up for registration on the wrong day. The woman also called me a liar in front of everyone--when I told her the registrars office told me when I asked -- they had told me to show up that day. (The confusion was because I had transferred from another college with all of my credits transferring as a junior.). BTW I was turned away the first day after standing in line with 30,000 students.

So I come back on they she designated and guess what? Two of the classes I preregistered for that were supposed to be guaranteed (took off from work previous summer with no pay) had been given away to someone else by students working registration. I know this because I overhead a guy in my dorm cafeteria bragging about it. When I tried to do something about it, it turned it was only a big deal to me.
 
Sep 2017
5,469
6,530
Massachusetts
#18
My twin and I were the first to go to college from both sides of my parent's family. Even attending a public state college, albeit a good reputation as having one of best business colleges in the nation, there was a lot of stuff we had to learn the hard way. My first experience was being called a moron in front of other students during registration because I allegedly showed up for registration on the wrong day. The woman also called me a liar in front of everyone--when I told her the registrars office told me when I asked -- they had told me to show up that day. (The confusion was because I had transferred from another college with all of my credits transferring as a junior.). BTW I was turned away the first day after standing in line with 30,000 students.

So I come back on they she designated and guess what? Two of the classes I preregistered for that were supposed to be guaranteed (took off from work previous summer with no pay) had been given away to someone else by students working registration. I know this because I overhead a guy in my dorm cafeteria bragging about it. When I tried to do something about it that turned it was only a big deal to me.
When I first showed up at college, I was a bit of a fish out of water, too. I'd actually already had some advanced classes at a good college in my home town during high school, but I hadn't really had any exposure to college life, and it felt like those with older siblings and parents who'd lived that life knew so much more than me.... how to register, what "office hours" were, what it mean to "audit" a course, what kinds of writing college teachers expected, etc. I remember on one of the first days I went to buy my textbooks and thought there'd been some sort of printing error-- like there's no way a single textbook could cost over $100.
 
Likes: EnigmaO01
Mar 2012
55,595
37,063
New Hampshire
#19
Yeah. I've really noticed that in the Boston area, especially. I mean, think about the competition just from within Massachusetts: Harvard, MIT, BC, BU, Tufts, Brandeis, Wellesley, Amherst, Williams, WPI, Clark, Northeastern, Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Holy Cross, Babson, Bentley, Stonehill, Simmons, Hampshire, etc. You probably have ten institutions that would be the best in plenty of states, and twenty that are better than your average state school. And that's not to get into all the other elite New England schools for which Boston is the job market magnet: Bowdoin, Bates, Colby, Dartmouth, Brown, Middlebury, and even Yale. If you don't have a "nameplate" degree here, getting your foot in the door with a competitive employer is damned hard. A UNH or UMaine degree may be comparable to UMichigan or UTexas, etc., but in the local market, it just doesn't mean as much. Even UMass, which US News ranks as the 26th-best public university in the country, is seen as a safety school.
So many people just dont get that. My nephew from NY went to community college and then two years at a SUNY school for his bachelors. He has been trying to get a job in the Boston area. I told him it was going to be hard for him from the get go but he and his mom refused to believe me. He has even had employers snicker when he tells them he went to a State University. It really can hamper ones career around here. There is just too many others to consider first. Its still old school around here that the rest of the country doesnt understand.
 
Mar 2010
20,196
12,990
Indiana
#20
When I first showed up at college, I was a bit of a fish out of water, too. I'd actually already had some advanced classes at a good college in my home town during high school, but I hadn't really had any exposure to college life, and it felt like those with older siblings and parents who'd lived that life knew so much more than me.... how to register, what "office hours" were, what it mean to "audit" a course, what kinds of writing college teachers expected, etc. I remember on one of the first days I went to buy my textbooks and thought there'd been some sort of printing error-- like there's no way a single textbook could cost over $100.
Yeah what a racket that textbook thing was. And then when you went to sell the book back at the end of the semester it wasn't worth much even in excellent condition.
 
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Likes: Arkady