What the rich know about getting into college.

Mar 2010
20,293
13,146
Indiana
#21
What got me was I was told I might want to take a study habits class as I was in the big league now vs the community college I graduated from with honors. So I'm thinking let me get this straight, I rarely see my prof (classes are mostly taught by students). The prof isn't there because education isn't his priority, getting published is, so he can keep his job. When I do see the prof he's reading exactly what's in my text and there about 250 of us in the lecture hall. And this is supposed to be better than my community college where we had no lecture halls, and the maximum number of students in the class was about 25? On top of that at the CC the prof doesn't have to worry about being published to keep his job, and there are NO student teachers. WTF am I paying more for this for?! But I guess in my accounting class if the average score in the group class got above 70 percent, the AI is was threatened with being fired -- this is supposed to make it a great university?
 
Apr 2014
38,207
24,426
Maryland
#22
My daughter is still pretty young, but already I'm starting to think about these things in ways that I feel guilty about. I'm not the sort who would bribe someone or come up with fraudulent evidence of non-existent qualifications for my daughter to get her into a good school. But I will absolutely use unfair advantages that are open to us because we have money. I expect my daughter will get SAT tutoring, when the time comes. I'm going to try to maneuver her into the kinds of extracurriculars that I know will enhance her application. I'll help to polish her applications essays to a fine sheen. I'll make sure she doesn't have to take the highest-paying summer jobs if there are more prestigious unpaid internships available. If I wind up having inside connections at the universities she's targeting, I won't be above making a phone call. And if she applies to my alma mater, I'll definitely encourage her to identify herself as a legacy, with the hopes that will help. I recognize that's all unfair, but it's the shit we do for our kids. In the same sense, if she were black, I'd encourage her to list her race on her application, to get a leg up.
My granddaughter did all you hope to do with your daughter...plus she got straight As she got accepted to several colleges but University of Delaware is offering her $68,000 in scholarship money.

I would tell my students who were black to do just what you suggested like work at food banks and things like that but the reality is we are not talking about people just payI g monew but coaches who got millions in bribes. I want to know what is going to happen to the students who were fraudulently accepted . I guess nothing
 
Sep 2017
5,469
6,536
Massachusetts
#23
Yeah what a racket that textbook thing was. And then when you went to sell the book back at the end of the semester it wasn't worth much even in excellent condition.
By the time I got to law school, I refused to play along. They had the textbooks in the library, and so I just went there to read them. I was sick of blowing an extra few thousand dollars on books each year.
 
Likes: EnigmaO01
Sep 2017
5,469
6,536
Massachusetts
#24
What got me was I was told I might want to take a study habits class as I was in the big league now vs the community college I graduated from with honors. So I'm thinking let me get this straight, I rarely see my prof (classes are mostly taught by students). The prof isn't there because education isn't his priority, getting published is, so he can keep his job. When I do see the prof he's reading exactly what's in my text and there about 250 of us in the lecture hall. And this is supposed to be better than my community college where we had no lecture halls, and the maximum number of students in the class was about 25? On top of that at the CC the prof doesn't have to worry about being published to keep his job, and there are NO student teachers. WTF am I paying more for this for?! But I guess in my accounting class if the average score in the group class got above 70 percent, the AI is was threatened with being fired -- this is supposed to make it a great university?
Even among traditional universities, there's little apparent connection between quality of education and reputation. For example, I remember seeing the Massachusetts Bar Exam pass/fail rates for various law schools, back when I came out, and some of the really elite law schools (Harvard/Yale) actually had lower pass rates than the next tier down. Possibly that has changed in the subsequent years, but at the time, the profs at the elite schools were often focused on doing media appearances, writing best-selling books, and schmoozing with power brokers, rather than teaching their students (think: Dershowitz). They saw class time as an inconvenience they have to endure so they can continue to use the title "law professor."

I'd like to see an attempt to measure universities more quantitatively, regarding quality. For example, it might be interesting to compare the average SAT score for those admitted to the school to the average GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT score for the same students when they leave. If you're accepting students in the top 10%, and graduating students in the top 20%, it doesn't say much for the impact of your school on the quality of the education you're providing. If you're accepting top 20% students and graduating top 10% student, on the other hand, it suggests you're doing a lot to bring them along.
 
Likes: EnigmaO01
Sep 2017
5,469
6,536
Massachusetts
#25
My granddaughter did all you hope to do with your daughter...plus she got straight As she got accepted to several colleges but University of Delaware is offering her $68,000 in scholarship money.

I would tell my students who were black to do just what you suggested like work at food banks and things like that but the reality is we are not talking about people just payI g monew but coaches who got millions in bribes. I want to know what is going to happen to the students who were fraudulently accepted . I guess nothing
It sounds like the students who have been accepted but hadn't started classes are having acceptance revoked. Those who are already there, though, I don't know. If it were up to me, I'd say that if they had any knowledge/involvement in the scheme, they should be expelled. If they didn't, and they've been decent students, I guess I'd let them stay. Even though they didn't deserve to take that spot from someone else, it would be unfairly disruptive to toss them out at that point, when they didn't personally do anything wrong.
 
Mar 2010
20,293
13,146
Indiana
#26
Even among traditional universities, there's little apparent connection between quality of education and reputation. For example, I remember seeing the Massachusetts Bar Exam pass/fail rates for various law schools, back when I came out, and some of the really elite law schools (Harvard/Yale) actually had lower pass rates than the next tier down. Possibly that has changed in the subsequent years, but at the time, the profs at the elite schools were often focused on doing media appearances, writing best-selling books, and schmoozing with power brokers, rather than teaching their students (think: Dershowitz). They saw class time as an inconvenience they have to endure so they can continue to use the title "law professor."

I'd like to see an attempt to measure universities more quantitatively, regarding quality. For example, it might be interesting to compare the average SAT score for those admitted to the school to the average GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT score for the same students when they leave. If you're accepting students in the top 10%, and graduating students in the top 20%, it doesn't say much for the impact of your school on the quality of the education you're providing. If you're accepting top 20% students and graduating top 10% student, on the other hand, it suggests you're doing a lot to bring them along.
I'm pretty sure the girl I dated that graduated Harvard Law failed her first bar exam and possibly more. She didn't end up a lawyer, but got a job working for the federal reserve in DC. Not saying that was a step down though. Just what I know.