What's so racist about Blackface?

Jan 2007
33,739
7,191
#12
Megyn Kelly is catching heat on social media once again.

This time, for comments she made during "Megyn Kelly Today" Tuesday about dressing up in blackface for Halloween. During a panel discussion, Kelly wondered "But what is racist?" when it comes to costumes choices for the October holiday.

"Because you do get in trouble if you are a white person who puts on blackface on Halloween, or a black person that puts on whiteface for Halloween," she said. "And back when I was a kid, that was OK, as long as you were dressing up as, like, a character." Kelly then mused about a recent blackface controversy to expand on her stance

There was a controversy on 'The Real Housewives of New York' with Luann (de Lesseps). She dressed as Diana Ross, and she made her skin look darker than it really is. And people said that that was racist. And I don’t know!" she explained. "I thought like, who doesn’t love Diana Ross? She wants to look like Diana Ross for one day, and I don’t know how that got racist on Halloween."

Her comments were rejected by the group at the "Today" table and plenty of people on social media reacted similarly:

Social media slams Megyn Kelly for defending blackface on 'Today' show

Hopefully, she will learn something from this experience.
Don't say or do anything in a diverse crowd. Someone will be gunning for you.
 
Mar 2012
53,725
35,579
New Hampshire
#13
I think it's pretty evident what the means. That it's pretty offensive. Maybe some people like Kelly don't know that yet.

Like I said, I hope she learns from this. I don't think she is racist btw. Just clueless sometimes.
She is old enough to know better. But I dont think a lot of the college kids have no idea its considered offensive. They had a Cinco de Mayo party at a local college and the kids donned sombreros and mustaches and they got in big trouble.

UNH Group Calls for Change After Cinco de Mayo Celebration
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
63,499
51,826
CA
#14
She is old enough to know better. But I dont think a lot of the college kids have no idea its considered offensive. They had a Cinco de Mayo party at a local college and the kids donned sombreros and mustaches and they got in big trouble.

UNH Group Calls for Change After Cinco de Mayo Celebration
Well then those college kids are clueless as well - most of your links show they get "called" out on what they have done.

Hopefully, a learning lesson for them like it is for Kelly,

And maybe their parents need to do a better job as well.
 
Jun 2013
17,338
14,807
Here
#16
Actually it is a good discussion and hopefully gets lots of people to think, not only about racism, but both the things they do that might be offensive and their sensitivities.
There are many forms of discrimination, including toward those that do not adopt trendy points of view by those that do adopt points of views without stopping to really think about them. Yes, racism exists, but so do sensitivities that verge on the absurd when applied universally, thus it is good to have thoughtful conversation, not just adopt points of views because they are trendy and it is important to also fully understand, what one is adopting as a point of view as well as understand why any of us might be sensitive about something to the point we think everyone else like us, should share the same level of sensitivity.

I am totally on board with being sensitive to other people's feelings, but I am NOT on board with sensitivities to feelings that lack consensus or context. I don't believe that because I dislike certain foods or that if I had allergies, those food should be banned to everyone. I DO believe that there is IMPORTANCE of people being informed and cognizant about sensitivities people have to food and food allergies.

There are plenty of reasons, but also plenty of context surrounding WHY anyone is sensitive to anything. There is context behind why someone dressing in "blackface" (which has context of its own and it is NOT the same as dressing up as Diana Ross because someone loves Diana Ross) is offensive because of the period and events in which it was common and who and what used it and why. To simply tell children or anyone it is against the rules to wear a costume that represents a black person without adding the context, is unfair and perplexing and it does NOTHING to explain why or prevent another recurrence of all the things it is offensive for. The natural question younger people are going to ask is why then, is it not offensive for a black person to dress as a white person or any person who is NOT 100% native American to dress up as a native American?

Some young people actually choose to dress up as people they ADMIRE and LOOK UP TO...........be it someone black, someone white, a Native American, someone Hispanic. whatever. In some instances the irony of some of this is we actually DRIVE WEDGES instead of remove them, in the effort to try to make all people, no matter the color of their skin or their ethnicity, as human as the next person.

Yes, teach the past, teach the inequities the brutal bigotry and DISCUSS what racism is all about and how it NEEDS context to define the difference between what is racist and what is innocent referral to someone else, even more than referral, but a means to suggest someone honors and admires them.

If we are going to make rules about racism, they should be clear and universally accepted by those who feel an act is an act of racism......otherwise it becomes opinion, not consensus.

The world does NOT have to stop serving peanuts (and this comes from someone I know with peanut allergies) or foods with gluten in them, because some people have allergies to them, however, it would HELP those with allergies, if people were informed about them and how those with allergies can be affected by more than ingesting them whole and directly, so that, even though gluten and peanuts will still be served, those without allergies to them can avoid harm to people with them, by checking ingredients and not using the same utensils and vessels that held or include those things so that food is contaminated with allergens to those with allergies.

It is a good discussion to have to sort out what the "rules" should be, why and how to inform anyone subjected to them, as to why they exist, giving them context and real reasons for their existence.

Much of what anyone would characterize as "political correctness" or sensitivities is very valid, but it would seem dishonest to say that some sensitivities are not overblown and do NOT represent a consensus or a majority and are taken out of context. Trump and his supporters like seize on the less valid ones to dismiss "PC" altogether, except when it comes to their own sensitivities and how unfair they think others are treating them. It is good we are sensitive, but we should understand what we are being sensitive about and why (context) and not just simply jump on a "PC" wagon for the same reasons others are told they should dismiss anything "PC" altogether.

Discussion is good, as long as we all keep open minds. Open minds bring progress and unfortunately, progress is something some people seem to fight hard against. Most important seems the capacity to discuss AND listen and be able distinguish the legitimate from the illegitimate, when it comes to invoking regulations based on ideals. I like or want or I don't like/don't want, are not legitimate reasons. Make a case and look at all the angles, including those that might come back to kick you in the butt based on the very things you are advocating for.
 
Last edited:
Apr 2015
13,132
2,238
Katmandu
#17
Well then those college kids are clueless as well - most of your links show they get "called" out on what they have done.

Hopefully, a learning lesson for them like it is for Kelly,

And maybe their parents need to do a better job as well.
So you can only wear costumes of people that are similar to yourself.........
 
Likes: orangecat

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