Where Is Transylvania?

Jun 2014
59,999
34,322
Cleveland, Ohio
#11
No, I don't think I saw any of them in theaters, but that film was creepy enough on TV!
When "The Tingler" was released in 1959, I was six and my Irish Twin was seven. My brother claims he recalls seeing this movie at the theater:


Producer William Castle went all out to assure this film's success. He hired randim women to scream at tense moments in the movies, wired a few seats in the theater to give the occupant a little electric shock, had a nurse standing by in the lobby AND made movie goers sign a release saying they accepted the risk the film would scare them to death.

William Castle at Columbia

It was not just a movie! It was more like a real life haunted house, in which kids watched a movie. My brother is still an addict, LOL.
 
Oct 2018
2,698
3,405
Somewhere they can't find me.
#12
When "The Tingler" was released in 1959, I was six and my Irish Twin was seven. My brother claims he recalls seeing this movie at the theater:


Producer William Castle went all out to assure this film's success. He hired randim women to scream at tense moments in the movies, wired a few seats in the theater to give the occupant a little electric shock, had a nurse standing by in the lobby AND made movie goers sign a release saying they accepted the risk the film would scare them to death.

William Castle at Columbia

It was not just a movie! It was more like a real life haunted house, in which kids watched a movie. My brother is still an addict, LOL.
They sure don't make 'em like that anymore! ;)

I can't even imagine how scary that would have been for anyone under 20 (and it makes me wonder if theater owners were reimbursed for their cleaning expenses). I remember the news reports of people passing out and needing medical assistance when The Exorcist was first released. And those were adults!
 
Jun 2014
59,999
34,322
Cleveland, Ohio
#13
They sure don't make 'em like that anymore! ;)

I can't even imagine how scary that would have been for anyone under 20 (and it makes me wonder if theater owners were reimbursed for their cleaning expenses). I remember the news reports of people passing out and needing medical assistance when The Exorcist was first released. And those were adults!
"The Exorcist" came out my freshman year in college....the first time I was under no obligation to appease anyone by pretending to attend Mass, etc.

I was so scared, I slept with an Old English Sheepdog my BFF#4 owned, for a week. In July. Without a/c!

What if...............?

LOL.
 

Helena

Former Staff
Sep 2007
5,046
2,925
Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
#15
So.....vampires. Maybe? Definitely? ¡No way, Jose'!

And, if they are real-ish, why did nobody who spoke English know about them until Bram Stoker wrote his iconic novel in 1897?

@Helena.....is this novel well-known in The Czech Republic?

If not, is there a Czech vampire myth? Where did it begin?
That's not quite true. Le Fanu's "Carmilla" (which, unlike Stoker's "Dracula," I have read) was first published in 1872, and I don't think it was literally the first English story about vampires.

Carmilla - Wikipedia

The first Czech translation of Bram Stoker's book was published in 1919, and of course it's been published in Czech many times since then. I would still say that the movies are better known. There is also a Czech musical titled "Dracula" from the 1990s, loosely based on the book. It's probably awful.

There is some original and really old (think a thousand years) Czech vampire lore, but it's a pretty safe bet that most Czechs think "Dracula" (and, if they're under 25, probably "Twilight") when they hear about vampires, not these stories:

Monsters of Prague: The Vampire Graves
 
Jun 2014
59,999
34,322
Cleveland, Ohio
#17
That's not quite true. Le Fanu's "Carmilla" (which, unlike Stoker's "Dracula," I have read) was first published in 1872, and I don't think it was literally the first English story about vampires.

Carmilla - Wikipedia

The first Czech translation of Bram Stoker's book was published in 1919, and of course it's been published in Czech many times since then. I would still say that the movies are better known. There is also a Czech musical titled "Dracula" from the 1990s, loosely based on the book. It's probably awful.

There is some original and really old (think a thousand years) Czech vampire lore, but it's a pretty safe bet that most Czechs think "Dracula" (and, if they're under 25, probably "Twilight") when they hear about vampires, not these stories:

Monsters of Prague: The Vampire Graves

How can any teenager like the "Twilight" series better than ANYTHING known as "the Monsters of Prague"!?
 

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