Which of these health insurance policies is best?

Which of these health insurance plans is best?

  • $1,250 a month premium, $0 deductible, $0 coinsurance, $0 copay, everything is covered in full.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • $1,000/month premium, $3,000 deductible, $0 coinsurance/copays, covered in full after deductible.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • $750/month premium, $6,000 deductible, $0 coinsurance, $0 copays, covered in full after deductible.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
Feb 2010
33,476
23,178
between Moon and NYC
This lacks meaning. A hypothetical was given that essentially asked, "would you rather 1) take a risk that you might have to pay me $(x), or 2) just pay me (x) right now?" And people are answering "well, that depends." I mean, what?! Between the two options, any rational person would rather take a risk of having to pay (x) instead of just agreeing to pay (x).

Some people seem to either have an irrational fear of high deductibles mixed with an insufficient awareness of what their premiums are costing them, or perhaps they have bullshit reasons for pretending high deductible plans are inherently and necessarily "crappy" even though they know better.


Was actually a pretty creative riddle on your part...
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
62,032
50,266
CA
This lacks meaning. A hypothetical was given that essentially asked, "would you rather 1) take a risk that you might have to pay me $(x), or 2) just pay me (x) right now?" And people are answering "well, that depends." I mean, what?! Between the two options, any rational person would rather take a risk of having to pay (x) instead of just agreeing to pay (x).

Some people seem to either have an irrational fear of high deductibles mixed with an insufficient awareness of what their premiums are costing them, or perhaps they have bullshit reasons for pretending high deductible plans are inherently and necessarily "crappy" even though they know better.
So you put up hypothetical numbers? And you were dismissing me because I could not remember what our premium cost was back in the 90's?

That's rich.
 
Feb 2010
33,476
23,178
between Moon and NYC
well, that's because they have no way to afford the total they may be required to pay. I'm thinking almost all were looking at this from their individual points of view - and no normal person could afford $15,000 dollars in a year for health costs. not everybody is filthy rich.
Has nothing to do with being "filthy rich".

At least according this source, the average family spent around $18,000 last year combining premiums and deductibles.

"That means that, last year, the average family paid $9,996 for coverage alone, and, if they met their deductible, a total of just under $18,000. Meanwhile, an average individual spent $3,852 on coverage and, if she spent another $4,358 to meet her deductible, a total of $8,210. "

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/23/heres-how-much-the-average-american-spends-on-health-care.html
 
Jan 2014
16,162
6,165
south
Has nothing to do with being "filthy rich".

At least according this source, the average family spent around $18,000 last year combining premiums and deductibles.

"That means that, last year, the average family paid $9,996 for coverage alone, and, if they met their deductible, a total of just under $18,000. Meanwhile, an average individual spent $3,852 on coverage and, if she spent another $4,358 to meet her deductible, a total of $8,210. "

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/23/heres-how-much-the-average-american-spends-on-health-care.html
well, I didn't see the earnings of the "average American family" anywhere in the link. have any idea what that is?
 
Likes: 1 person
Feb 2011
16,353
5,689
Boise, ID
well, that's because they have no way to afford the total they may be required to pay. I'm thinking almost all were looking at this from their individual points of view - and no normal person could afford $15,000 dollars in a year for health costs. not everybody is filthy rich.
For the purpose of answering the question, we could divide each number by 100, so that basically everybody could afford to pay it, or multiple each number by a billion, so that nobody in the world could afford to pay it, and it wouldn't matter, because it's a hypothetical question/math problem, which of the four is best. The question wasn't "which of these is a great plan," nor was it "which of these could you afford," nor was it "should we adopt single payer?" It was "which is the best of the four?"
 
Jan 2014
16,162
6,165
south
For the purpose of answering the question, we could divide each number by 100, so that basically everybody could afford to pay it, or multiple each number by a billion, so that nobody in the world could afford to pay it, and it wouldn't matter, because it's a hypothetical question/math problem, which of the four is best. The question wasn't "which of these is a great plan," nor was it "which of these could you afford," nor was it "should we adopt single payer?" It was "which is the best of the four?"
you will note I objected to your "nobody has any idea of their health costs" stipulation, as most have a very good idea what they are facing based on their medical history. is this is a strictly math question, why didn't you use a accidental death benefit as an example?
 
Apr 2012
57,332
42,148
Englewood,Ohio
you will note I objected to your "nobody has any idea of their health costs" stipulation, as most have a very good idea what they are facing based on their medical history. is this is a strictly math question, why didn't you use a accidental death benefit as an example?
If you don’t know what your Health care costs, deduction,drug coverage is you are not a very smart business person.
 
Feb 2011
16,353
5,689
Boise, ID
So you put up hypothetical numbers? And you were dismissing me because I could not remember what our premium cost was back in the 90's?

That's rich.
I wasn't "dismissing you because you couldn't remember," I was dismissing your anecdote as being convincing that high-deductible plans are necessarily "crap," because there was insufficient information about your anecdotal plan or the alternatives that were available at the time.

From what I've pieced together, you paid $12,000 in premiums that year for an insurance plan that did not offer you maternity care, and so you dropped another $15,000 above the $12,000 in premiums on maternity care.

This makes me wonder what the premiums would have been for a health insurance plan that did cover maternity care.
 
Jul 2013
51,112
54,261
Nashville, TN
This is all just rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, our healthcare system is in a crisis of cost and delivery, and no amount of manipulating the numbers is going to fix it. We will be forced into a UHC system of some sort or watch half the population descend into third world health care situations. It is the number one concern of Americans right now and is getting worse every day.

Poll: Americans say health care is most important issue
https://www.cnn.com/2017/07/17/politics/bloomberg-poll-health-care-findings/index.html
 
Feb 2011
16,353
5,689
Boise, ID
This is all just rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, our healthcare system is in a crisis of cost and delivery, and no amount of manipulating the numbers is going to fix it. We will be forced into a UHC system of some sort or watch half the population descend into third world health care situations. It is the number one concern of Americans right now and is getting worse every day.

https://www.cnn.com/2017/07/17/politics/bloomberg-poll-health-care-findings/index.html
And whenever that finally happens, I will remember back on this thread and think, "thank goodness government is finally paying for it, because holy shit people couldn't even do a simple math problem to select the most rational health insurance policy."