White supremacy and white nationalism have re-entered our political conversation. But what do they mean?

the watchman

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Experts say that amid the heated rhetoric of race, such inflammatory terms are often being incorrectly used interchangeably. Using the terms so broadly and generally can actually be harmful in that it desensitizes and normalizes what should--by most measures-- be considered abhorrent behavior, said Terrence Johnson, an associate professor of religion and politics at Georgetown University.



Law enforcement agencies are especially troubled and on alert when they notice self identified white nationalists active on websites and social media identified with hate groups and see it as a warning sign that violent acts might follow.

Here's what you need to know.



Just tune into Fox News any day of the week and you can see it for yourself. The things that are said on that network would have be unheard of not so long ago. Tucker Carlson saying white nationalism is a hoax. Laura Ingraham comments about "demographic changes". They have a running narrative premised on criticizing the black community.

Then there's Trump.

Let's not be coy or polite about it . We elected a stoned cold racist as our president. He began his campaign on a racist premise , he won the nomination on a racist premise, he got elected on a racist premise , he's governed based on racism and he intends to run his reelection on a racist premise. The list is too extensive to go into. It's so prominent that the Democrats running for president have all called it out. If they haven't outright called Trump a racist they most certainly have alluded to it. We need to have an honest discussion about where we are on race. And most especially how we discuss race on political sites , like PH, social media, or in our daily lives.

My guess is that we won't be able to.
 
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Experts say that amid the heated rhetoric of race, such inflammatory terms are often being incorrectly used interchangeably. Using the terms so broadly and generally can actually be harmful in that it desensitizes and normalizes what should--by most measures-- be considered abhorrent behavior, said Terrence Johnson, an associate professor of religion and politics at Georgetown University.



Law enforcement agencies are especially troubled and on alert when they notice self identified white nationalists active on websites and social media identified with hate groups and see it as a warning sign that violent acts might follow.

Here's what you need to know.



Just tune into Fox News any day of the week and you can see it for yourself. The things that are said on that network would have be unheard of not so long ago. Tucker Carlson saying white nationalism is a hoax. Laura Ingraham comments about "demographic changes". They have a running narrative premised on criticizing the black community.

Then there's Trump.

Let's not be coy or polite about it . We elected a stoned cold racist as our president. He began his campaign on a racist premise , he won the nomination on a racist premise, he got elected on a racist premise , he's governed based on racism and he intends to run his reelection on a racist premise. The list is too extensive to go into. It's so prominent that the Democrats running for president have all called it out. If they haven't outright called Trump a racist they most certainly have alluded to it. We need to have an honest discussion about where we are on race. And most especially how we discuss race on political sites , like PH, social media, or in our daily lives.

My guess is that we won't be able to.
This part is worthy if not painfully obvious:

“A racist is not always a white supremacist or white nationalist, but a white supremacist is always a racist,” John Cohen, a former senior Department of Homeland Security official and current ABC News contributor said.
 
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Oct 2019
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Experts say that amid the heated rhetoric of race, such inflammatory terms are often being incorrectly used interchangeably. Using the terms so broadly and generally can actually be harmful in that it desensitizes and normalizes what should--by most measures-- be considered abhorrent behavior, said Terrence Johnson, an associate professor of religion and politics at Georgetown University.



Law enforcement agencies are especially troubled and on alert when they notice self identified white nationalists active on websites and social media identified with hate groups and see it as a warning sign that violent acts might follow.

Here's what you need to know.



Just tune into Fox News any day of the week and you can see it for yourself. The things that are said on that network would have be unheard of not so long ago. Tucker Carlson saying white nationalism is a hoax. Laura Ingraham comments about "demographic changes". They have a running narrative premised on criticizing the black community.

Then there's Trump.

Let's not be coy or polite about it . We elected a stoned cold racist as our president. He began his campaign on a racist premise , he won the nomination on a racist premise, he got elected on a racist premise , he's governed based on racism and he intends to run his reelection on a racist premise. The list is too extensive to go into. It's so prominent that the Democrats running for president have all called it out. If they haven't outright called Trump a racist they most certainly have alluded to it. We need to have an honest discussion about where we are on race. And most especially how we discuss race on political sites , like PH, social media, or in our daily lives.

My guess is that we won't be able to.
Who are these "experts"?
 

the watchman

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Jul 2011
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This part is worthy if not painfully obvious:

“A racist is not always a white supremacist or white nationalist, but a white supremacist is always a racist,” John Cohen, a former senior Department of Homeland Security official and current ABC News contributor said.
and if they're wearing a "MAGA" hat it's safe to say they can't tell the difference.
 
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the watchman

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Oh yeah, socialists like Bernie Sanders.
it tells you who the experts is right there in the information you quoted.
Experts say that amid the heated rhetoric of race, such inflammatory terms are often being incorrectly used interchangeably. Using the terms so broadly and generally can actually be harmful in that it desensitizes and normalizes what should--by most measures-- be considered abhorrent behavior, said Terrence Johnson, an associate professor of religion and politics at Georgetown University.


Out of curiosity who would you consider an expert?
 
Oct 2019
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it tells you who the experts is right there in the information you quoted.

Out of curiosity who would you consider an expert?
It also quotes Bernie Sanders. So this "professor" of religion is an expert on race. Cool. Does he have a degree in race studies? I would never call myself an "expert" on anything, nor would I call anyone else an expert. Too much responsibility. I think it's phony.
 
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it tells you that in the article
The Watchman,

Actually, no it doesn't. That appears to be an unsupported editorial comment inserted to attempt to lend some credence to article. It states in several places "experts say," but only quote two people. John Cohen, ex-DHS official, I'll grant, could be considered an expert. Terrence Johnson, associate professor of religion and politics? Maryline Mayo? not so much. And if you can only find three people to quote, it is a little disingenuous to say "experts say," would you not agree?
 
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