"Why We Hate" Documentary

Jun 2014
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Did it explain the role of adrenaline in those instances? People can try to live in a hyper-aware state, but that is hard on the body. If, for example, Trump really is a snorting Adderall quite often, then he’s at greater risk of a stroke and heart attack. Adrenaline-junkies engage in risky behavior to get their adrenaline-fix. Over time the odd could turn against them and they become a statistic.

I don't recall a discussion of hormones, but you are correct.

Equally important is to reduce anxiety, and the book has specific advice on this. The trouble with anxiety is twofold. You focus on specific fears chosen by neurosis, so you distort your perceptions of dangerousness. Child sex attacks are a great example of this. If you have a pathological fear of homosexuals, on account of the fear of what they may do to children, you are more likely to miss the danger posed by the family friend or neighbor who commits 99% of such crimes.

The other problem is, if you are hypervigilant you are responding to internal emotional states, not your environment. You may envision the mugger as a scruffy black teenaged boy and thus be more likely to succumb to the predation of the charming, well-dressed white stranger who rapes or kills you.

You have to be fully mentally, emotionally and subconsciously present to detect danger in your immediate environment.
 
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I don't recall a discussion of hormones, but you are correct.

Equally important is to reduce anxiety, and the book has specific advice on this. The trouble with anxiety is twofold. You focus on specific fears chosen by neurosis, so you distort your perceptions of dangerousness. Child sex attacks are a great example of this. If you have a pathological fear of homosexuals, on account of the fear of what they may do to children, you are more likely to miss the danger posed by the family friend or neighbor who commits 99% of such crimes.

The other problem is, if you are hypervigilant you are responding to internal emotional states, not your environment. You may envision the mugger as a scruffy black teenaged boy and thus be more likely to succumb to the predation of the charming, well-dressed white stranger who rapes or kills you.

You have to be fully mentally, emotionally and subconsciously present to detect danger in your immediate environment.
Rabbits lock up in fear. Some people will “freeze” when confronted with a dangerous situation. It’s why military personnel train, train, train and train some more so that they react instinctively and not have to think about it. I’ve read dozens of accounts where people were debriefed and their response is “I just did as we trained”. They never even thought about it.
 
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StanStill

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Terrific series by Stephen Speilberg, etc. explores how hate created necessary survival behaviors in prehistoric humans, and the impact of the inherited "behaviors" on our society today.

[Media]

Streaming on Pluto and CBS Now. And elsewhere, for a fee.

Watch episode 2, "Tribalism", if not all the episodes.

Anyone else seen it? What did you think?
Haven't seen it but am interested. The thing is, I think to say that prehistoric people "hated" is a bit misguided. They feared and perhaps even reacted with fear or suspicion or even violence, but the idea that they hated the way we think of hating today seems kind of far fetched to me.

All of our notions of the self have changed drastically just within recorded history. The concept of romantic love, and it's social value in songs and poetry is only about 900 years old, and is still evolving. There are lots of emotions and things that slowly evolve over centuries with our lived experience and our understanding of the world and ourselves, so I kind of doubt that prehistoric humans "hated" the way we hate. It's certainly an emotion that springs from those reptilian brain responses like fear and suspicion, though.

There are lots of emotions and desires in modern society that I think are manifestations of deeply embedded responses. Our African ancestors 100,000 years ago had to constantly be on the lookout for lions and hyenas, as well as sleeping lightly to avoid night predators. And that is something that is an embedded response not just for humans, but our simian ancestors going back millions of years. Today we really have little to no use for those "on edge" tendencies in the modern industrialized world, which by comparison is so utterly and completely safe and harmless that half of all people in the US will live to be 80 years old. Because of this, our nervous, fearful tendencies find expression in other places, even if the possibility that they will ever happen is completely negligible. You can't be chased by a lion, but you can ride a rollercoaster, or obsess over how "stranger danger" is so overwhelming that you forbid your child from walking to his friend's house in a completely residential neighborhood.

It comes out in all kinds of ways.
 
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Jun 2014
64,262
39,036
Cleveland, Ohio
Rabbits lock up in fear. Some people will “freeze” when confronted with a dangerous situation. It’s why military personnel train, train, train and train some more so that they react instinctively and not have to think about it. I’ve read dozens of accounts where people were debriefed and their response is “I just did as we trained”. They never even thought about it.
Rabbits "lock up" as a means of avoiding sight predators (if they do....I don't actually know.)

But yes, muscle memory matters enormously in humans.

I made my polite, sofy-spoken, kindly daughter practice getting up on her hind legs and shouting abuse at me before she left for college, because reacting "politely" to aggressive, violent men is dangerous. Shouting at least signals "I am not a compliant, willing victim".
 
Dec 2018
9,168
7,035
the Heart of America
Rabbits "lock up" as a means of avoiding sight predators (if they do....I don't actually know.)

But yes, muscle memory matters enormously in humans.

I made my polite, sofy-spoken, kindly daughter practice getting up on her hind legs and shouting abuse at me before she left for college, because reacting "politely" to aggressive, violent men is dangerous. Shouting at least signals "I am not a compliant, willing victim".
Yes, rabbits lock up because they are stupid and prey. It's all they can do. When I have time, I'll tell you my first rabbit hunting story. Yes, "freezing" as prey can be helpful since most predators, including humans, can see motion faster than detect prey in the bush. Because of this trait, predators are also more capable of detecting being hunted since they more easily see motion. Males, but evolution, have more visual skills than females. Females are better communicators, better socializers which is why they are better diplomats despite the fact most males dominate the position. Males are better at brute strength, hunting, visual cues, teamwork for hunting. Men are better at using and understanding hand signals for this reason. It's also why they are more aggressive since they are expendable (to an extent) to the tribe.

You're a good mother. :) I've worked with several former LEOs. One, who also happened to be a fellow Marine, often jogged with me. Once when jogging along a beach we spotted an attractive young woman and said "Hi!". She said nothing and just looked down. He told me that's common, "Women make themselves look weak and then become victims to criminals". After a long discussion this topic, it seemed that the way to handle avoiding becoming a victim of a criminal is the same strategy for avoiding being the victim of a bully. You're advice to your daughter is a good step in that direction.
 
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