Will political correctness kill classic movies?

Mar 2019
3,017
1,086
California
#21
I said no such thing. There are plenty of films from the 80s, 70s, 60s, &c., that were not "classics." Many were just stupid. They're getting stupider, I think, but that has nothing to do with my criteria or yours.

No, they weren't. "Classic" is not determine by time, era, whatever.
When you see "12 Angry Men" or "Double Indemnity" or "Inherit the Wind" ,there is no possibility todays movies can come close or even compete.
 
Sep 2011
24,980
17,423
aMEEErica
#22
I said no such thing. There are plenty of films from the 80s, 70s, 60s, &c., that were not "classics." Many were just stupid. They're getting stupider, I think, but that has nothing to do with my criteria or yours.

No, they weren't. "Classic" is not determine by time, era, whatever.
Yes you did...

You said "30 years, so therefore it is a classic," did you not?

You are missing the point Ian, it is not the total amount of years, but the era it was produced in that makes a film "classic," what part of that understanding are you having trouble with sir?


The 30s, 40s and 50s are the era of "classic talkies," it is hard to go outside the 1950s to find film that makes the accepted criteria, things changed a lot in the 60s the old "star system" and many movie moguls died off... stars, almost all of them were becoming their own "producers."

Before that, we had the "Silent Era," and everything else does not qualify into any "criteria" other than "modern" or "contemporary"... period.


"...and you know, you put all these things together and you have sort of a "happening" here..."

And that's the way it has been and always will be, 100 years from now it will be the same.

Thx :)
 
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Dec 2014
13,343
10,794
NWOHQ
#24
No, it won't, and it won't kill Italian exploitation movies from the 70's and 80's either and these make Hollywood look lame (not the member).
 
Likes: The Man

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
44,658
31,217
Toronto
#25
No, it won't, and it won't kill Italian exploitation movies from the 70's and 80's either and these make Hollywood look lame (not the member).
Oh, spare me "exploitation" lol

Russians in Hollywood are always either spies or gangsters or Ivan Drago. And typically played by non-Russian speakers who butchered the accent and language ("Chekhov" in Star Trek was a Lithuanian in real life, for example, although he actually wasn't so bad haha)

While you guys have had Al Pacino, etc :D
 
Dec 2014
13,343
10,794
NWOHQ
#26
Oh, spare me "exploitation" lol

Russians in Hollywood are always either spies or gangsters or Ivan Drago. And typically played by non-Russian speakers who butchered the accent and language ("Chekhov" in Star Trek was a Lithuanian in real life, for example, although he actually wasn't so bad haha)

While you guys have had Al Pacino, etc :D

So, you don't like exploitation films? You are dead to me. ;) Now, remember, I'm an Aussie and we make good films Like Picnic at Hanging Rock, Mad Max, Breaker Morant, Gallipoli, My Brilliant Career....and we have the WIGGLES! :p
 
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Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
73,881
42,397
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#28
Russians in Hollywood are always either spies or gangsters or Ivan Drago. And typically played by non-Russian speakers who butchered the accent and language ("Chekhov" in Star Trek was a Lithuanian in real life, for example, although he actually wasn't so bad haha)
In Star Trek, it was spelled "Chekov" (unlike the playwright). And while the Königsbergs (later Koenigs) emigrated to the U.S. from Lithuania, they were actually Russian Jews.

Walter Koenig - Wikipedia

:D
 
Sep 2011
24,980
17,423
aMEEErica
#29
In Star Trek, it was spelled "Chekov" (unlike the playwright). And while the Königsbergs (later Koenigs) emigrated to the U.S. from Lithuania, they were actually Russian Jews.

Walter Koenig - Wikipedia

:D
And check this out...


Most of the movie moguls were eastern European Jews who were born within 500 miles of each other.

Now... it is debatable, but see for yourselves, this exclusive club of gentlemen, more than anything else, and to this day made the America we think of, molded it into their own idealized version of what America meant to them...

It was not so much the "Founders" that made America, but the "Moguls."

Thx :nerd:
 
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Jul 2011
3,656
5,379
UK/Australia
#30
A 'classic' is popularly defined as - an outstanding example of a particular style; something of lasting worth or with a timeless quality; of the first or highest quality, class, or rank – something that exemplifies its class. A literary classic (per example) is a work which has never exhausted all it has to say to its readers, and a classic car (to give another example) is generally an older car with enough historical interest to be collectable and worth preserving or restoring rather than scrapping. In the case of cars, competition success of the marque, and rarity are significant factors in the designation. Many Bentleys, Ferraries, and Aston Martins may be headed for classic status in the course of time, but few Fords, Chevrolets, or Toyotas will be headed for anything but the breaker's yard in their twilight years.

So whilst all manner of things may be considered 'classic' by various individuals - it is not a precise designation. It is a matter of personal taste, and of considerable subjectivity. An old Hollywood Western may well be considered a 'classic' by some devotees of American cinema, but that is not an universal standard. And to an Austrian or Hungarian aesthete reared upon the literary and operatic classics - that may well be considered a heresy. ;)
 

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