Without Medicaid Expansion, Poor Forego Health Care

Jul 2016
5,668
4,572
DS9
#1
That's it. Just crawl into a hole and die. The Republicans don't care and yes, it's the Red States that disallowed Medicaid expansion. When we were in Fla this weekend (wife went down to assist with Hurricane Michael victims) we saw a report that the Republican Gubernatorial candidate, Rick DeSantis was asked what cancer patients should do for treatment. His reply?

Go to the ER. Seriously.

On the number one issue on Floridians’ minds Ron DeSantis still is mostly mute

Anyhow, back to the OP.

Study: Without Medicaid expansion, poor forgo medical care


Study: Without Medicaid expansion, poor forgo medical care
BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVARAssociated Press

October 15, 2018 11:19 AM

WASHINGTON
Low-income people in states that haven't expanded Medicaid are much more likely to forgo needed medical care than the poor in other states, according to a government report released Monday amid election debates from Georgia to Utah over coverage for the needy.

The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office worked with the National Center for Health Statistics to analyze federal survey data from 2016. The research focused on low-income adults ages 19-64 in states that did not expand Medicaid under the Obama-era Affordable Care Act, compared to their peers in states that did.

Medicaid expansion is an issue in several high-profile gubernatorial contests and in states where supporters have gotten referendum questions on the ballot. Under the law, states may expand Medicaid for low-income people making up to roughly $16,750 for an individual or $34,640 for a family of four. Seventeen states have not adopted the expansion, opposed by many — but not all — Republicans.
 
Jan 2014
16,076
4,218
California
#5
That's it. Just crawl into a hole and die. The Republicans don't care and yes, it's the Red States that disallowed Medicaid expansion. When we were in Fla this weekend (wife went down to assist with Hurricane Michael victims) we saw a report that the Republican Gubernatorial candidate, Rick DeSantis was asked what cancer patients should do for treatment. His reply?

Go to the ER. Seriously.

On the number one issue on Floridians’ minds Ron DeSantis still is mostly mute

Anyhow, back to the OP.

Study: Without Medicaid expansion, poor forgo medical care


Study: Without Medicaid expansion, poor forgo medical care
BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVARAssociated Press

October 15, 2018 11:19 AM

WASHINGTON
Low-income people in states that haven't expanded Medicaid are much more likely to forgo needed medical care than the poor in other states, according to a government report released Monday amid election debates from Georgia to Utah over coverage for the needy.

The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office worked with the National Center for Health Statistics to analyze federal survey data from 2016. The research focused on low-income adults ages 19-64 in states that did not expand Medicaid under the Obama-era Affordable Care Act, compared to their peers in states that did.

Medicaid expansion is an issue in several high-profile gubernatorial contests and in states where supporters have gotten referendum questions on the ballot. Under the law, states may expand Medicaid for low-income people making up to roughly $16,750 for an individual or $34,640 for a family of four. Seventeen states have not adopted the expansion, opposed by many — but not all — Republicans.
Mr. B,

and those with Medicaid are worse off than those with no health insurance at all:

Medicaid Is Worse Than No Coverage at All

a
 
Jul 2016
5,668
4,572
DS9
#6
Mr. B,

and those with Medicaid are worse off than those with no health insurance at all:

Medicaid Is Worse Than No Coverage at All

a
So you felt the need to reply with an op-ed from 2011 written by Trump's now commissioner of the FDA, a conservative in good standing, and who incredibly testified before Congress that the outrageous prices charged for the Epipen were no problem?

Try again. This one's a massive fail.
 
Jul 2016
5,668
4,572
DS9
#7
Mr. B,

and those with Medicaid are worse off than those with no health insurance at all:

Medicaid Is Worse Than No Coverage at All

a
Not to mention his lies were debunked several times over...

Medicaid Worsens Your Health? That’s a Classic Misinterpretation of Research

Medicaid Worsens Your Health? That’s a Classic Misinterpretation of Research
Image
CreditCreditIllustrations by Sandra, Randomhero, Andrew Doane, Daria Moskvina, Chanut is Industries, Ilaria Bernareggi; The Noun Project
By Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt
As a program for low-income Americans, Medicaid requires the poor to pay almost nothing for their health care. Republicans in Congress have made clear that they want to change that equation for many, whether through the health bill that is struggling in the Senate or through future legislation.
The current proposal, to scale back the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion and to cap spending each year, would give incentives to states to drop Medicaid coverage for millions of low-income Americans. It would offer tax credits toward premiums for private coverage, but those policies would come with thousands of dollars in new deductibles and other cost sharing. Despite the much higher out-of-pocket costs, some policy analysts and policy makers argue that low-income Americans would be better off.
To take one highly placed example, Seema Verma, the leader of the agency that administers Medicaid, recently cited studies questioning the program’s effectiveness and wrote that the health bill “will help Medicaid produce better results for recipients.”
Image


Do Medicaid patients fare worse than uninsured?


Are Medicaid patients more likely to die than uninsured, as Heritage Action CEO says?

By Amy Sherman on Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 at 4:13 p.m.



Heritage Action CEO Michael Needham talked about Medicaid in the Senate health care bill on "Fox News Sunday" on June 25, 2017.
In his defense of the Republican Senate health care proposal, Heritage Action for America CEO Michael Needham argued that some patients on Medicaid are more likely to die than those without insurance.
Needham, who heads up the conservative organization, questioned the effectiveness of Medicaid in an interview on Fox News Sunday June 25.
"If the Democratic Party wants to become the party of Medicaid, I don't think it's going to have a lot of success in the 21st century. Medicaid was a program designed in the middle of the last century where health outcomes between people on Medicaid and the completely uninsured are exactly the same. Actually, on some procedures, you're more likely to die if you're on Medicaid than if you're uninsured," Needham said.

Our ruling
Needham said, "Actually, on some procedures, you're more likely to die if you're on Medicaid than if you're uninsured."
Needham points to a 2011 op-ed that cited studies about the outcomes of patients on Medicaid for certain types of procedures. We were able to reach the authors of three of those studies who disputed Gottlieb’s conclusions.
We rate this claim Mostly False.
 
Jan 2014
16,076
4,218
California
#9
Not to mention his lies were debunked several times over...

Medicaid Worsens Your Health? That’s a Classic Misinterpretation of Research

Medicaid Worsens Your Health? That’s a Classic Misinterpretation of Research
Image
CreditCreditIllustrations by Sandra, Randomhero, Andrew Doane, Daria Moskvina, Chanut is Industries, Ilaria Bernareggi; The Noun Project
By Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt
As a program for low-income Americans, Medicaid requires the poor to pay almost nothing for their health care. Republicans in Congress have made clear that they want to change that equation for many, whether through the health bill that is struggling in the Senate or through future legislation.
The current proposal, to scale back the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion and to cap spending each year, would give incentives to states to drop Medicaid coverage for millions of low-income Americans. It would offer tax credits toward premiums for private coverage, but those policies would come with thousands of dollars in new deductibles and other cost sharing. Despite the much higher out-of-pocket costs, some policy analysts and policy makers argue that low-income Americans would be better off.
To take one highly placed example, Seema Verma, the leader of the agency that administers Medicaid, recently cited studies questioning the program’s effectiveness and wrote that the health bill “will help Medicaid produce better results for recipients.”
Image


Do Medicaid patients fare worse than uninsured?


Are Medicaid patients more likely to die than uninsured, as Heritage Action CEO says?
By Amy Sherman on Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 at 4:13 p.m.



Heritage Action CEO Michael Needham talked about Medicaid in the Senate health care bill on "Fox News Sunday" on June 25, 2017.
In his defense of the Republican Senate health care proposal, Heritage Action for America CEO Michael Needham argued that some patients on Medicaid are more likely to die than those without insurance.
Needham, who heads up the conservative organization, questioned the effectiveness of Medicaid in an interview on Fox News Sunday June 25.
"If the Democratic Party wants to become the party of Medicaid, I don't think it's going to have a lot of success in the 21st century. Medicaid was a program designed in the middle of the last century where health outcomes between people on Medicaid and the completely uninsured are exactly the same. Actually, on some procedures, you're more likely to die if you're on Medicaid than if you're uninsured," Needham said.

Our ruling
Needham said, "Actually, on some procedures, you're more likely to die if you're on Medicaid than if you're uninsured."
Needham points to a 2011 op-ed that cited studies about the outcomes of patients on Medicaid for certain types of procedures. We were able to reach the authors of three of those studies who disputed Gottlieb’s conclusions.
We rate this claim Mostly False.
Mr. B,

Too bad you don't cite the study in question.