Woman Kills Intruder In Her Home

Nov 2018
6,057
1,862
Bel Air, MD
#51
I guess, by definition, most responsible adults will behave the way you say, since they wouldn't be responsible if they didn't. But, when, you look at the stories, there must be a lot of irresponsible adults, given all the time people are shooting innocents they thought were intruders, or shooting themselves while cleaning the gun, or leaving a gun around for a kid to shoot someone, etc. That's why the net impact, in the stats, is for people to be less safe with a gun in the house.
According to the U.S. Department of Justice, 1.03 million home invasions occur each year.Aug 5, 2017

I think there is a need for families to have guns.

I think responsible adults should have a gun in the house, if they want. But, how do we know if they are responsible? Maybe, there should be a short course on the use of guns, safety procedures, and how to always secure the gun so children don't have access to them. When our nation was founded, most every household had at least one gun in it. I doubt if many of them were having issues with it.
 
Nov 2018
6,057
1,862
Bel Air, MD
#52
So, a woman saving herself with a gun is OK but statistically she was safer without a gun than with one. Not a gun owner myself but seems to me if she was a good enough shot to shoot the guy in the head she was statistically safer with a gun.
I agree. The woman has a better chance of survival with a gun than not having one.
 
Oct 2014
32,217
5,809
C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
#53
Yes, the idea that every story about self-defense with a firearm is a good-guy-with-a-gun (and no room for ACTUAL conversation) is bullshit.
Not an argument, but If that was the message you wanted to send, then why would you list it with a story that works against that intent?

Thanks for agreeing with me.
Delusion was the word.

2nd strawman from you in 1 thread.
Why haven't you been able to demonstrate either?

If you want to have that conversation, I'm not going to stand in your way. But from me to you, I already made it clear that I personally don't want to cheapen this and other stories with that claptrap - it always devolves into personalities over substance.
You ARE cheapening the story and worse, you are effectively sending the message that the criminal SHOULD HAVE gotten away with what he was planning with that woman trapped in her own home.

The only unfortunate part of the story is that this woman has to clean the brains of that criminal off her floors.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
75,109
43,839
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#55
But, when, you look at the stories, there must be a lot of irresponsible adults, given all the time people are shooting innocents they thought were intruders, or shooting themselves while cleaning the gun, or leaving a gun around for a kid to shoot someone, etc.
There are a lot of irresponsible adults. (And let us not forget the police shootings of innocent people, too...) And a lot of responsible ones, too; considering the number of guns in circulation, one might expect more accidents and/or mistakes than we have, or at least than we hear about.
 
Likes: OlGuy

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
75,109
43,839
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#56
You ARE cheapening the story and worse, you are effectively sending the message that the criminal SHOULD HAVE gotten away with what he was planning with that woman trapped in her own home.
I did not see him articulating any such position.
The only unfortunate part of the story is that this woman has to clean the brains of that criminal off her floors.
Do we know that was a problem? Perhaps the bullet did not exit, and he fell in such a way as to preclude such a mess from being made. (Though maybe he tracked in some dirt...)
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
75,109
43,839
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#57
So, a woman saving herself with a gun is OK but statistically she was safer without a gun than with one. Not a gun owner myself but seems to me if she was a good enough shot to shoot the guy in the head she was statistically safer with a gun.
Well, she was not statistically safer, but she was actually safer, as it turned out. But the point is valid ... it does not make sense to say a person is safer under any circumstance where he or she might be required or expected to be the victim of a crime based on statistics.
 
Likes: OlGuy
Nov 2018
6,057
1,862
Bel Air, MD
#58
How do you define "mental issues"?
It's not easy to define, but anyone who is seeing a professional because of severe depression, or has shown signs of being a danger to society, then they shouldn't be trusted with guns. The problem, though, is not everyone who has mental health issues has been diagnosed.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
75,109
43,839
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#59
It's not easy to define, but anyone who is seeing a professional because of severe depression, or has shown signs of being a danger to society, then they shouldn't be trusted with guns.
Even "shown signs of danger" is kind of nebulous, though. And severe depression is not really such a sign, when you consider that the overwhelming majority of people who have Major Depressive Disorder (and most mental illnesses, for that matter) are a danger to no one.
 
Likes: OlGuy
Nov 2018
6,057
1,862
Bel Air, MD
#60
Even "shown signs of danger" is kind of nebulous, though. And severe depression is not really such a sign, when you consider that the overwhelming majority of people who have Major Depressive Disorder (and most mental illnesses, for that matter) are a danger to no one.
I agree. I don't know what laws can be passed that would be fair to everyone. We certainly don't want some psychopath owning a gun, but a lot of people with depression, etc. shouldn't be disqualified.
 

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